22 U.S. Code § 504 - Transfer of hemisphere territory from one non-American power to another; recognition; consultation with American Republics

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(1) The United States would not recognize any transfer, and would not acquiesce in any attempt to transfer, any geographic region of this hemisphere from one non-American power to another non-American power; and
(2) If such transfer or attempt to transfer should appear likely, the United States shall, in addition to other measures, immediately consult with the other American republics to determine upon the steps which should be taken to safeguard their common interests.

Source

(Apr. 10, 1941, ch. 49, 55 Stat. 133.)
Purpose of Enactment

The “whereas” clauses preceding the resolving words in Joint Res. Apr. 10, 1941, provided as follows:
“Whereas our traditional policy has been to consider any attempt on the part of non-American powers to extend their system to any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous to the peace and safety not only of this country but of the other American republics; and
“Whereas the American republics agreed at the Inter-American Conference for the Maintenance of Peace held in Buenos Aires in 1936 and at the Eighth International Conference of American States held in Lima in 1938 to consult with one another in the event that the peace, security, or territorial integrity of any American republic should be threatened; and
“Whereas the Meeting of the Foreign Ministers of the American Republics at Panama October 3, 1939, resolved ‘That in case any geographic region of America subject to the jurisdiction of any non-American state should be obliged to change its sovereignty and there should result therefrom a danger to the security of the American Continent, a consultative meeting such as the one now being held will be convoked with the urgency that the case may require’:”.

The table below lists the classification updates, since Jan. 3, 2012, for this section. Updates to a broader range of sections may be found at the update page for containing chapter, title, etc.

The most recent Classification Table update that we have noticed was Tuesday, August 13, 2013

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22 USCDescription of ChangeSession YearPublic LawStatutes at Large

 

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