42 U.S. Code § 15001 - Findings, purposes, and policy

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(a) Findings
Congress finds that—
(1) disability is a natural part of the human experience that does not diminish the right of individuals with developmental disabilities to live independently, to exert control and choice over their own lives, and to fully participate in and contribute to their communities through full integration and inclusion in the economic, political, social, cultural, and educational mainstream of United States society;
(2) in 1999, there were between 3,200,000 and 4,500,000 individuals with developmental disabilities in the United States, and recent studies indicate that individuals with developmental disabilities comprise between 1.2 and 1.65 percent of the United States population;
(3) individuals whose disabilities occur during their developmental period frequently have severe disabilities that are likely to continue indefinitely;
(4) individuals with developmental disabilities often encounter discrimination in the provision of critical services, such as services in the areas of emphasis (as defined in section 15002 of this title);
(5) individuals with developmental disabilities are at greater risk than the general population of abuse, neglect, financial and sexual exploitation, and the violation of their legal and human rights;
(6) a substantial portion of individuals with developmental disabilities and their families do not have access to appropriate support and services, including access to assistive technology, from generic and specialized service systems, and remain unserved or underserved;
(7) individuals with developmental disabilities often require lifelong community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance, that are most effective when provided in a coordinated manner;
(8) there is a need to ensure that services, supports, and other assistance are provided in a culturally competent manner, that ensures that individuals from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds are fully included in all activities provided under this subchapter;
(9) family members, friends, and members of the community can play an important role in enhancing the lives of individuals with developmental disabilities, especially when the family members, friends, and community members are provided with the necessary community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance;
(10) current research indicates that 88 percent of individuals with developmental disabilities live with their families or in their own households;
(11) many service delivery systems and communities are not prepared to meet the impending needs of the 479,862 adults with developmental disabilities who are living at home with parents who are 60 years old or older and who serve as the primary caregivers of the adults;
(12) in almost every State, individuals with developmental disabilities are waiting for appropriate services in their communities, in the areas of emphasis;
(13) the public needs to be made more aware of the capabilities and competencies of individuals with developmental disabilities, particularly in cases in which the individuals are provided with necessary services, supports, and other assistance;
(14) as increasing numbers of individuals with developmental disabilities are living, learning, working, and participating in all aspects of community life, there is an increasing need for a well trained workforce that is able to provide the services, supports, and other forms of direct assistance required to enable the individuals to carry out those activities;
(15) there needs to be greater effort to recruit individuals from minority backgrounds into professions serving individuals with developmental disabilities and their families;
(16) the goals of the Nation properly include a goal of providing individuals with developmental disabilities with the information, skills, opportunities, and support to—
(A) make informed choices and decisions about their lives;
(B) live in homes and communities in which such individuals can exercise their full rights and responsibilities as citizens;
(C) pursue meaningful and productive lives;
(D) contribute to their families, communities, and States, and the Nation;
(E) have interdependent friendships and relationships with other persons;
(F) live free of abuse, neglect, financial and sexual exploitation, and violations of their legal and human rights; and
(G) achieve full integration and inclusion in society, in an individualized manner, consistent with the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities of each individual; and
(17) as the Nation, States, and communities maintain and expand community living options for individuals with developmental disabilities, there is a need to evaluate the access to those options by individuals with developmental disabilities and the effects of those options on individuals with developmental disabilities.
(b) Purpose
The purpose of this subchapter is to assure that individuals with developmental disabilities and their families participate in the design of and have access to needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination, independence, productivity, and integration and inclusion in all facets of community life, through culturally competent programs authorized under this subchapter, including specifically—
(1) State Councils on Developmental Disabilities in each State to engage in advocacy, capacity building, and systemic change activities that—
(A) are consistent with the purpose described in this subsection and the policy described in subsection (c) of this section; and
(B) contribute to a coordinated, consumer- and family-centered, consumer- and family-directed, comprehensive system that includes needed community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance that promote self-determination for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families;
(2) protection and advocacy systems in each State to protect the legal and human rights of individuals with developmental disabilities;
(3) University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service—
(A) to provide interdisciplinary pre-service preparation and continuing education of students and fellows, which may include the preparation and continuing education of leadership, direct service, clinical, or other personnel to strengthen and increase the capacity of States and communities to achieve the purpose of this subchapter;
(B) to provide community services—
(i) that provide training and technical assistance for individuals with developmental disabilities, their families, professionals, paraprofessionals, policymakers, students, and other members of the community; and
(ii) that may provide services, supports, and assistance for the persons described in clause (i) through demonstration and model activities;
(C) to conduct research, which may include basic or applied research, evaluation, and the analysis of public policy in areas that affect or could affect, either positively or negatively, individuals with developmental disabilities and their families; and
(D) to disseminate information related to activities undertaken to address the purpose of this subchapter, especially dissemination of information that demonstrates that the network authorized under this part is a national and international resource that includes specific substantive areas of expertise that may be accessed and applied in diverse settings and circumstances; and
(4) funding for—
(A) national initiatives to collect necessary data on issues that are directly or indirectly relevant to the lives of individuals with developmental disabilities;
(B) technical assistance to entities who engage in or intend to engage in activities consistent with the purpose described in this subsection or the policy described in subsection (c) of this section; and
(C) other nationally significant activities.
(c) Policy
It is the policy of the United States that all programs, projects, and activities receiving assistance under this subchapter shall be carried out in a manner consistent with the principles that—
(1) individuals with developmental disabilities, including those with the most severe developmental disabilities, are capable of self-determination, independence, productivity, and integration and inclusion in all facets of community life, but often require the provision of community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance;
(2) individuals with developmental disabilities and their families have competencies, capabilities, and personal goals that should be recognized, supported, and encouraged, and any assistance to such individuals should be provided in an individualized manner, consistent with the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities of such individuals;
(3) individuals with developmental disabilities and their families are the primary decisionmakers regarding the services and supports such individuals and their families receive, including regarding choosing where the individuals live from available options, and play decisionmaking roles in policies and programs that affect the lives of such individuals and their families;
(4) services, supports, and other assistance should be provided in a manner that demonstrates respect for individual dignity, personal preferences, and cultural differences;
(5) specific efforts must be made to ensure that individuals with developmental disabilities from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds and their families enjoy increased and meaningful opportunities to access and use community services, individualized supports, and other forms of assistance available to other individuals with developmental disabilities and their families;
(6) recruitment efforts in disciplines related to developmental disabilities relating to pre-service training, community training, practice, administration, and policymaking must focus on bringing larger numbers of racial and ethnic minorities into the disciplines in order to provide appropriate skills, knowledge, role models, and sufficient personnel to address the growing needs of an increasingly diverse population;
(7) with education and support, communities can be accessible to and responsive to the needs of individuals with developmental disabilities and their families and are enriched by full and active participation in community activities, and contributions, by individuals with developmental disabilities and their families;
(8) individuals with developmental disabilities have access to opportunities and the necessary support to be included in community life, have interdependent relationships, live in homes and communities, and make contributions to their families, communities, and States, and the Nation;
(9) efforts undertaken to maintain or expand community-based living options for individuals with disabilities should be monitored in order to determine and report to appropriate individuals and entities the extent of access by individuals with developmental disabilities to those options and the extent of compliance by entities providing those options with quality assurance standards;
(10) families of children with developmental disabilities need to have access to and use of safe and appropriate child care and before-school and after-school programs, in the most integrated settings, in order to enrich the participation of the children in community life;
(11) individuals with developmental disabilities need to have access to and use of public transportation, in order to be independent and directly contribute to and participate in all facets of community life; and
(12) individuals with developmental disabilities need to have access to and use of recreational, leisure, and social opportunities in the most integrated settings, in order to enrich their participation in community life.

Source

(Pub. L. 106–402, title I, § 101,Oct. 30, 2000, 114 Stat. 1678.)
Short Title

Pub. L. 106–402, § 1(a),Oct. 30, 2000, 114 Stat. 1677, provided that: “This Act [see Tables for classification] may be cited as the ‘Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000’.”
Pub. L. 106–402, title II, § 201,Oct. 30, 2000, 114 Stat. 1728, provided that: “This title [enacting subchapter II of this chapter] may be cited as the ‘Families of Children With Disabilities Support Act of 2000’.”
Special Olympics Sport and Empowerment

Pub. L. 108–406, Oct. 30, 2004, 118 Stat. 2294, provided that:
“SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
“This Act may be cited as the ‘Special Olympics Sport and Empowerment Act of 2004’.
“SEC. 2. FINDINGS AND PURPOSE.
“(a) Findings.—Congress finds the following:
“(1) Special Olympics celebrates the possibilities of a world where everybody matters, everybody counts, every person has value, and every person has worth.
“(2) The Government and the people of the United States recognize the dignity and value the giftedness of children and adults with an intellectual disability.
“(3) The Government and the people of the United States are determined to end the isolation and stigmatization of people with an intellectual disability.
“(4) For more than 36 years, Special Olympics has encouraged skill, sharing, courage, and joy through year-round sports training and athletic competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities.
“(5) Special Olympics provides year-round sports training and competitive opportunities to 1,500,000 athletes with intellectual disabilities in 26 sports and plans to expand the joy of participation through sport to hundreds of thousands of people with intellectual disabilities within the United States and worldwide over the next 5 years.
“(6) Special Olympics has demonstrated its ability to provide a major positive effect on the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities, improving their health and physical well-being, building their confidence and self-esteem, and giving them a voice to become active and productive members of their communities.
“(7) In society as a whole, Special Olympics has become a vehicle and platform for breaking down artificial barriers, improving public health, changing negative attitudes in education, and helping athletes overcome the prejudice that people with intellectual disabilities face in too many places.
“(8) The Government of the United States enthusiastically supports Special Olympics, recognizes its importance in improving the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, and recognizes Special Olympics as a valued and important component of the global community.
“(b) Purpose.—The purposes of this Act are to—
“(1) provide support to Special Olympics to increase athlete participation in and public awareness about the Special Olympics movement;
“(2) dispel negative stereotypes about people with intellectual disabilities;
“(3) build athletic and family involvement through sport; and
“(4) promote the extraordinary gifts of people with intellectual disabilities.
“SEC. 3. ASSISTANCE FOR SPECIAL OLYMPICS.
“(a) Education Activities.—The Secretary of Education may award grants to, or enter into contracts or cooperative agreements with, Special Olympics to carry out the following:
“(1) Activities to promote the expansion of Special Olympics, including activities to increase the participation of individuals with intellectual disabilities within the United States.
“(2) The design and implementation of Special Olympics education programs, including character education and volunteer programs that support the purposes of this Act, that can be integrated into classroom instruction and are consistent with academic content standards.
“(b) International Activities.—The Secretary of State may award grants to, or enter into contracts or cooperative agreements with, Special Olympics to carry out the following:
“(1) Activities to increase the participation of individuals with intellectual disabilities in Special Olympics outside of the United States.
“(2) Activities to improve the awareness outside of the United States of the abilities and unique contributions that individuals with intellectual disabilities can make to society.
“(c) Healthy Athletes.—
“(1) In general.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services may award grants to, or enter into contracts or cooperative agreements with, Special Olympics for the implementation of on-site health assessments, screening for health problems, health education, data collection, and referrals to direct health care services.
“(2) Coordination.—Activities under paragraph (1) shall be coordinated with private health providers, existing authorized programs of State and local jurisdictions, or the Department of Health and Human Services, as applicable.
“(d) Limitation.—Amounts appropriated to carry out this section shall not be used for direct treatment of diseases, medical conditions, or mental health conditions. Nothing in the preceding sentence shall be construed to limit the use of non-Federal funds by Special Olympics.
“SEC. 4. APPLICATION AND ANNUAL REPORT.
“(a) Application.—
“(1) In general.—To be eligible for a grant, contract, or cooperative agreement under subsection (a), (b), or (c) ofsection 3, Special Olympics shall submit an application at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary of Education, Secretary of State, or Secretary of Health and Human Services, as applicable, may require.
“(2) Content.—At a minimum, an application under this subsection shall contain the following:
“(A) Activities.—A description of activities to be carried out with the grant, contract, or cooperative agreement.
“(B) Measurable goals.—Information on specific measurable goals and objectives to be achieved through activities carried out with the grant, contract, or cooperative agreement.
“(b) Annual Report.—
“(1) In general.—As a condition on receipt of any funds under subsection (a), (b), or (c) ofsection 3, Special Olympics shall agree to submit an annual report at such time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Secretary of Education, Secretary of State, or Secretary of Health and Human Services, as applicable, may require.
“(2) Content.—At a minimum, each annual report under this subsection shall describe the degree to which progress has been made toward meeting the goals and objectives described in the applications submitted under subsection (a).
“SEC. 5. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.
“There are authorized to be appropriated—
“(1) for grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements under section 3 (a), $5,500,000 for fiscal year 2005, and such sums as may be necessary for each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years;
“(2) for grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements under section 3 (b), $3,500,000 for fiscal year 2005, and such sums as may be necessary for each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years; and
“(3) for grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements under section 3 (c), $6,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.”
Ex. Ord. No. 12994. President’s Committee on Mental Retardation

Ex. Ord. No. 12994, Mar. 21, 1996, 61 F.R. 13047, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 13309, July 25, 2003, 68 F.R. 44851; Ex. Ord. No. 13446, § 5, Sept. 28, 2007, 72 F.R. 56176, provided:
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to promote full participation of people with intellectual disabilities in their communities, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Committee Continued and Responsibilities Expanded. The President’s Committee on Mental Retardation, with expanded membership and expanded responsibilities, and renamed the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (Committee), is hereby continued in operation.
Sec. 2. Composition of Committee. (a) The Committee shall be composed of the following members:
(1) The Attorney General;
(2) The Secretary of the Interior;
(3) The Secretary of Commerce;
(4) The Secretary of Labor;
(5) The Secretary of Health and Human Services;
(6) The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development;
(7) The Secretary of Transportation;
(8) The Secretary of Education;
(9) The Secretary of Homeland Security;
(10) The Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation for National and Community Service;
(11) The Commissioner of Social Security;
(12) The Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission;
(13) The Chairperson of the National Council on Disability; and
(14) No more than 21 other members who shall be appointed to the Committee by the President. These citizen members shall consist of individuals who represent a broad spectrum of perspectives, experience, and expertise on intellectual disabilities; persons with intellectual disabilities and members of families with a child or adult with intellectual disabilities; and persons employed in either the public or the private sector. Except as the President may from time to time otherwise direct, appointees under this paragraph shall serve for two-year terms, except that an appointment made to fill a vacancy occurring before the expiration of a term shall be made for the balance of the unexpired term.
(b) The President shall designate the Chair of the Committee from the 21 citizen members. The Chair shall preside over meetings of the Committee and represent the Committee on appropriate occasions.
Sec. 3. Functions of the Committee. (a) Consistent with subsection (c) of this section, the Committee shall:
(1) provide such advice concerning intellectual disabilities as the President or the Secretary of Health and Human Services may request; and
(2) provide advice to the President concerning the following for people with intellectual disabilities:
(A) expansion of educational opportunities;
(B) promotion of homeownership;
(C) assurance of workplace integration;
(D) improvement of transportation options;
(E) expansion of full access to community living; and
(F) increasing access to assistive and universally designed technologies.
(b) The Committee shall provide an annual report to the President through the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Such additional reports may be made as the President may direct or as the Committee may deem appropriate.
(c) The members shall advise the President and carry out their advisory role consistent with the requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.).
Sec. 4. Cooperation by Agencies. The heads of Federal departments and agencies shall:
(a) designate, when requested by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, an officer or employee of such department or agency to serve as a liaison with the Committee; and
(b) furnish such information and assistance to the Committee, to the extent permitted by law, as the Secretary of Health and Human Services may request to assist the Committee in performing its functions under this order.
Sec. 5. Administration. (a) The Department of Health and Human Services shall provide the Committee with necessary staff support, administrative services and facilities, and funding, to the extent permitted by law.
(b) Each member of the Committee, except any member who receives other compensation from the United States Government, may receive compensation for each day engaged in the work of the Committee, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 3109), and may also receive travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5701–5707), for persons employed intermittently in the Government service. Committee members with disabilities may be compensated for attendant expenses, consistent with Government procedures and practices.
(c) The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall perform such other functions with respect to the Committee as may be required by the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), except that of reporting to the Congress.
Sec. 6. General. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed as subjecting any Federal agency, or any function vested by law in, or assigned pursuant to law to, any Federal agency, to the authority of the Committee or as abrogating or restricting any such function in any manner.
(b) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, instrumentalities, or entities, its officers or employees, or any other person.
Extension of Term of President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (formerly President’s Committee on Mental Retardation)

Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Dec. 31, 1982, by Ex. Ord. No. 12258, Dec. 31, 1980, 46 F.R. 1251, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1984, by Ex. Ord. No. 12399, Dec. 31, 1982, 48 F.R. 379, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1985, by Ex. Ord. No. 12489, Sept. 28, 1984, 49 F.R. 38927, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1987, by Ex. Ord. No. 12534, Sept. 30, 1985, 50 F.R. 40319, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1989, by Ex. Ord. No. 12610, Sept. 30, 1987, 52 F.R. 36901, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1991, by Ex. Ord. No. 12692, Sept. 29, 1989, 54 F.R. 40627, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1993, by Ex. Ord. No. 12774, Sept. 27, 1991, 56 F.R. 49835, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1995, by Ex. Ord. No. 12869, Sept. 30, 1993, 58 F.R. 51751, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1997, by Ex. Ord. No. 12974, Sept. 29, 1995, 60 F.R. 51875, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 1999, by Ex. Ord. No. 13062, § 1(k), Sept. 29, 1997, 62 F.R. 51755, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 2001, by Ex. Ord. No. 13138, Sept. 30, 1999, 64 F.R. 53879, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation extended until Sept. 30, 2003, by Ex. Ord. No. 13225, Sept. 28, 2001, 66 F.R. 50291, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Name of President’s Committee on Mental Retardation changed to Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities and term of such committee extended until Sept. 30, 2005, by Ex. Ord. No. 13309, § 5, July 25, 2003, 68 F.R. 44851, formerly set out as a note under this section.
Term of the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities extended until Sept. 30, 2007, by Ex. Ord. No. 13385, Sept. 29, 2005, 70 F.R. 57989, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities extended until Sept. 30, 2009, by Ex. Ord. No. 13446, Sept. 28, 2007, 72 F.R. 56175, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities extended until Sept. 30, 2011, by Ex. Ord. No. 13511, Sept. 29, 2009, 74 F.R. 50909, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities extended until Sept. 30, 2013, by Ex. Ord. No. 13585, Sept. 30, 2011, 76 F.R. 62281, formerly set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.
Term of the President’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities extended until Sept. 30, 2015, by Ex. Ord. No. 13652, Sept. 30, 2013, 78 F.R. 61817, set out as a note under section 14 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act in the Appendix to Title 5.

 

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