42 U.S. Code § 290aa–5b - Grants for ecstasy and other club drugs abuse prevention

(a) Authority
The Administrator may make grants to, and enter into contracts and cooperative agreements with, public and nonprofit private entities to enable such entities—
(1) to carry out school-based programs concerning the dangers of the abuse of and addiction to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other drugs commonly referred to as “club drugs” using methods that are effective and science-based, including initiatives that give students the responsibility to create their own anti-drug abuse education programs for their schools; and
(2) to carry out community-based abuse and addiction prevention programs relating to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs that are effective and science-based.
(b) Use of funds
Amounts made available under a grant, contract or cooperative agreement under subsection (a) of this section shall be used for planning, establishing, or administering prevention programs relating to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs.
(c) Use of funds
(1) Discretionary functions
Amounts provided to an entity under this section may be used—
(A) to carry out school-based programs that are focused on those districts with high or increasing rates of abuse and addiction to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs and targeted at populations that are most at risk to start abusing these drugs;
(B) to carry out community-based prevention programs that are focused on those populations within the community that are most at-risk for abuse of and addiction to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs;
(C) to assist local government entities to conduct appropriate prevention activities relating to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs;
(D) to train and educate State and local law enforcement officials, prevention and education officials, health professionals, members of community anti-drug coalitions and parents on the signs of abuse of and addiction to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs and the options for treatment and prevention;
(E) for planning, administration, and educational activities related to the prevention of abuse of and addiction to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs;
(F) for the monitoring and evaluation of prevention activities relating to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs and reporting and disseminating resulting information to the public; and
(G) for targeted pilot programs with evaluation components to encourage innovation and experimentation with new methodologies.
(2) Priority
The Administrator shall give priority in awarding grants under this section to rural and urban areas that are experiencing a high rate or rapid increases in abuse and addiction to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs.
(d) Allocation and report
(1) Prevention program allocation
Not less than $500,000 of the amount appropriated in each fiscal year to carry out this section shall be made available to the Administrator, acting in consultation with other Federal agencies, to support and conduct periodic analyses and evaluations of effective prevention programs for abuse of and addiction to 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, related drugs, and other club drugs and the development of appropriate strategies for disseminating information about and implementing such programs.
(2) Report
The Administrator shall annually prepare and submit to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate, and the Committee on Commerce, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives, a report containing the results of the analyses and evaluations conducted under paragraph (1).
(e) Authorization of appropriations
There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this section—
(1) $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2001; and
(2) such sums as may be necessary for each succeeding fiscal year.

Source

(July 1, 1944, ch. 373, title V, § 506B, as added Pub. L. 106–310, div. B, title XXXVI, § 3665(a),Oct. 17, 2000, 114 Stat. 1244.)
Change of Name

Committee on Commerce of House of Representatives changed to Committee on Energy and Commerce of House of Representatives, and jurisdiction over matters relating to securities and exchanges and insurance generally transferred to Committee on Financial Services of House of Representatives by House Resolution No. 5, One Hundred Seventh Congress, Jan. 3, 2001.
Findings

Pub. L. 106–310, div. B, title XXXVI, § 3662,Oct. 17, 2000, 114 Stat. 1241, provided that: “Congress makes the following findings:
“(1) The illegal importation of 3,4-methylenedioxy methamphetamine, commonly referred to as ‘MDMA’ or ‘Ecstasy’ (referred to in this subtitle [subtitle C (§§ 3661–3665) of title XXXVI of div. B of Pub. L. 106–310, see section 3661 ofPub. L. 106–310, set out as a Short Title of 2000 Amendment note under section 201 of this title] as ‘Ecstasy’), has increased in recent years, as evidenced by the fact that Ecstasy seizures by the United States Customs Service have increased from less than 500,000 tablets during fiscal year 1997 to more than 9,000,000 tablets during the first 9 months of fiscal year 2000.
“(2) Use of Ecstasy can cause long-lasting, and perhaps permanent, damage to the serotonin system of the brain, which is fundamental to the integration of information and emotion, and this damage can cause long-term problems with learning and memory.
“(3) Due to the popularity and marketability of Ecstasy, there are numerous Internet websites with information on the effects of Ecstasy, the production of Ecstasy, and the locations of Ecstasy use (often referred to as ‘raves’). The availability of this information targets the primary users of Ecstasy, who are most often college students, young professionals, and other young people from middle- to high-income families.
“(4) Greater emphasis needs to be placed on—
“(A) penalties associated with the manufacture, distribution, and use of Ecstasy;
“(B) the education of young people on the negative health effects of Ecstasy, since the reputation of Ecstasy as a ‘safe’ drug is the most dangerous component of Ecstasy;
“(C) the education of State and local law enforcement agencies regarding the growing problem of Ecstasy trafficking across the United States;
“(D) reducing the number of deaths caused by Ecstasy use and the combined use of Ecstasy with other ‘club’ drugs and alcohol; and
“(E) adequate funding for research by the National Institute on Drug Abuse to—
“(i) identify those most vulnerable to using Ecstasy and develop science-based prevention approaches tailored to the specific needs of individuals at high risk;
“(ii) understand how Ecstasy produces its toxic effects and how to reverse neurotoxic damage;
“(iii) develop treatments, including new medications and behavioral treatment approaches;
“(iv) better understand the effects that Ecstasy has on the developing children and adolescents; and
“(v) translate research findings into useful tools and ensure their effective dissemination.”

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42 CFR - Public Health

42 CFR Part 54a - CHARITABLE CHOICE REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS AND RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS RECEIVING DISCRETIONARY FUNDING UNDER...290aa, ET SEQ., FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT SERVICES

 

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