42 U.S. Code § 300cc–1 - Requirement of expediting awards of grants and contracts for research

(a) In general
The Secretary shall expedite the award of grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements for research projects relating to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (including such research projects initiated independently of any solicitation by the Secretary for proposals for such research projects).
(b) Time limitations with respect to certain applications
(1) With respect to programs of grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements described in subsection (a) of this section, any application submitted in response to a solicitation by the Secretary for proposals pursuant to such a program—
(A) may not be approved if the application is submitted after the expiration of the 3-month period beginning on the date on which the solicitation is issued; and
(B) shall be awarded, or otherwise finally acted upon, not later than the expiration of the 6-month period beginning on the expiration of the period described in subparagraph (A).
(2) If the Secretary makes a determination that it is not practicable to administer a program referred to in paragraph (1) in accordance with the time limitations described in such paragraph, the Secretary may adjust the time limitations accordingly.
(c) Requirements with respect to adjustments in time limitations
With respect to any program for which a determination described in subsection (b)(2) of this section is made, the Secretary shall—
(1) if the determination is made before the Secretary issues a solicitation for proposals pursuant to the program, ensure that the solicitation describes the time limitations as adjusted by the determination; and
(2) if the determination is made after the Secretary issues such a solicitation for proposals, issue a statement describing the time limitations as adjusted by the determination and individually notify, with respect to the determination, each applicant whose application is submitted before the expiration of the 3-month period beginning on the date on which the solicitation was issued.
(d) Annual reports to Congress
Except as provided in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretary shall annually prepare, for inclusion in the comprehensive report required in section 300cc  [1] of this title, a report—
(A) summarizing programs for which the Secretary has made a determination described in subsection (b)(2) of this section, including a description of the time limitations as adjusted by the determination and including a summary of the solicitation issued by the Secretary for proposals pursuant to the program; and
(B) summarizing applications that—
(i) were submitted pursuant to a program of grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements referred to in paragraph (1) of subsection (b) of this section for which a determination described in paragraph (2) of such subsection has not been made; and
(ii) were not processed in accordance with the time limitations described in such paragraph (1).
(e) Quarterly reports for fiscal year 1989
For fiscal year 1989, the report required in subsection (d) of this section shall, not less than quarterly, be prepared and submitted to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Labor and Human Resources of the Senate.


[1]  See References in Text note below.

Source

(July 1, 1944, ch. 373, title XXIII, § 2302, as added Pub. L. 100–607, title II, § 201(4),Nov. 4, 1988, 102 Stat. 3063.)
References in Text

Section 300cc of this title, referred to in subsec. (d), was repealed by Pub. L. 109–482, title I, § 104(b)(2)(C),Jan. 15, 2007, 120 Stat. 3693.
Prior Provisions

A prior section 300cc–1, act July 1, 1944, § 2302, was successively renumbered by subsequent acts and transferred, see section 238a of this title.
Change of Name

Committee on Labor and Human Resources of Senate changed to Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of Senate by Senate Resolution No. 20, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Jan. 19, 1999.
Committee on Energy and Commerce of House of Representatives treated as referring to Committee on Commerce of House of Representatives by section 1(a) ofPub. L. 104–14, set out as a note preceding section 21 of Title 2, The Congress. Committee on Commerce of House of Representatives changed to Committee on Energy and Commerce of House of Representatives, and jurisdiction over matters relating to securities and exchanges and insurance generally transferred to Committee on Financial Services of House of Representatives by House Resolution No. 5, One Hundred Seventh Congress, Jan. 3, 2001.
Development of Rapid HIV Test

Pub. L. 106–345, title V, § 502,Oct. 20, 2000, 114 Stat. 1353, provided that:
“(a) Expansion, Intensification, and Coordination of Research and Other Activities.—
“(1) In general.—The Director of NIH shall expand, intensify, and coordinate research and other activities of the National Institutes of Health with respect to the development of reliable and affordable tests for HIV disease that can rapidly be administered and whose results can rapidly be obtained (in this section referred to as ‘rapid HIV test’).
“(2) Report to congress.—The Director of NIH shall periodically submit to the appropriate committees of Congress a report describing the research and other activities conducted or supported under paragraph (1).
“(3) Authorization of appropriations.—For the purpose of carrying out this subsection, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 2001 through 2005.
“(b) Premarket Review of Rapid HIV Tests.—
“(1) In general.—Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act [Oct. 20, 2000], the Secretary, in consultation with the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, shall submit to the appropriate committees of the Congress a report describing the progress made towards, and barriers to, the premarket review and commercial distribution of rapid HIV tests. The report shall—
“(A) assess the public health need for and public health benefits of rapid HIV tests, including the minimization of false positive results through the availability of multiple rapid HIV tests;
“(B) make recommendations regarding the need for the expedited review of rapid HIV test applications submitted to the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research and, if such recommendations are favorable, specify criteria and procedures for such expedited review; and
“(C) specify whether the barriers to the premarket review of rapid HIV tests include the unnecessary application of requirements—
“(i) necessary to ensure the efficacy of devices for donor screening to rapid HIV tests intended for use in other screening situations; or
“(ii) for identifying antibodies to HIV subtypes of rare incidence in the United States to rapid HIV tests intended for use in screening situations other than donor screening.
“(c) Guidelines of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.—Promptly after commercial distribution of a rapid HIV test begins, the Secretary, acting through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall establish or update guidelines that include recommendations for States, hospitals, and other appropriate entities regarding the ready availability of such tests for administration to pregnant women who are in labor or in the late stage of pregnancy and whose HIV status is not known to the attending obstetrician.”
Limitation on Expenditures for AIDS and HIV Activities

Pub. L. 104–146, § 11,May 20, 1996, 110 Stat. 1373, provided that: “Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the total amounts of Federal funds expended in any fiscal year for AIDS and HIV activities may not exceed the total amounts expended in such fiscal year for activities related to cancer.”
Vaccines for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Pub. L. 103–43, title XIX, § 1901(b),June 10, 1993, 107 Stat. 200, provided that:
“(1) In general.—The Secretary of Health and Human Services, acting through the National Institutes of Health, shall develop a plan for the appropriate inclusion of HIV-infected women, including pregnant women, HIV-infected infants, and HIV-infected children in studies conducted by or through the National Institutes of Health concerning the safety and efficacy of HIV vaccines for the treatment and prevention of HIV infection. Such plan shall ensure the full participation of other Federal agencies currently conducting HIV vaccine studies and require that such studies conform fully to the requirements of part 46 of title 45, Code of Federal Regulations.
“(2) Report.—Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act [June 10, 1993], the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall prepare and submit to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on Labor and Human Resources [now Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions] of the Senate, a report concerning the plan developed under paragraph (1).
“(3) Implementation.—Not later than 12 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Health and Human Services shall implement the plan developed under paragraph (1), including measures for the full participation of other Federal agencies currently conducting HIV vaccine studies.
“(4) Authorization of appropriations.—For the purpose of carrying out this subsection, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 1994 through 1996.”
Ex. Ord. No. 12963. Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS

Ex. Ord. No. 12963, June 14, 1995, 60 F.R. 31905, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 13009, June 14, 1996, 61 F.R. 39799 [30799], provided:
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, I hereby direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services to exercise her discretion as follows:
Section 1. Establishment. (a) The Secretary of Health and Human Services (the “Secretary”) shall establish an HIV/AIDS Advisory Council (the “Advisory Council” or the “Council”), to be known as the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. The Advisory Council shall be composed of not more than 35 members to be appointed or designated by the Secretary. The Advisory Council shall comply with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.).
(b) The Secretary shall designate a Chairperson from among the members of the Advisory Council.
Sec. 2. Functions. The Advisory Council shall provide advice, information, and recommendations to the Secretary regarding programs and policies intended to (a) promote effective prevention of HIV disease, (b) advance research on HIV and AIDS, and (c) promote quality services to persons living with HIV disease and AIDS. The functions of the Advisory Council shall be solely advisory in nature. The Secretary shall provide the President with copies of all written reports provided to the Secretary by the Advisory Council.
Sec. 3. Administration. (a) The heads of executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent permitted by law, provide the Advisory Council with such information as it may require for purposes of carrying out its functions.
(b) Any members of the Advisory Council that receive compensation shall be compensated in accordance with Federal law. Committee members may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, to the extent permitted by law for persons serving intermittently in the Government service (5 U.S.C. section 5701–5707).
(c) To the extent permitted by law, and subject to the availability of appropriations, the Department of Health and Human Services shall provide the Advisory Council with such funds and support as may be necessary for the performance of its functions.
Sec. 4. General Provisions. (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of any other Executive order, any functions of the President under the Federal Advisory Committee Act that are applicable to the Advisory Council, except that of reporting annually to the Congress, shall be performed by the Department of Health and Human Services, in accordance with the guidelines and procedures established by the Administrator of General Services.
(b) This order is intended only to improve the internal management of the executive branch, and it is not intended to create any right, benefit, or trust responsibility, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United States, its agencies, it officers, or any person.
William J. Clinton.
Ex. Ord. No. 13649. Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care Continuum Initiative

Ex. Ord. No. 13649, July 15, 2013, 78 F.R. 43057, provided:
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to further strengthen the capacity of the Federal Government to effectively respond to the ongoing domestic HIV epidemic, it is hereby ordered as follows:
Section 1. Policy. Addressing the domestic HIV epidemic is a priority of my Administration. In 2010, the White House released the first comprehensive National HIV/AIDS Strategy (Strategy), setting quantitative goals for reducing new HIV infections, improving health outcomes for people living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related health disparities. The Strategy will continue to serve as the blueprint for our national response to the domestic epidemic. It has increased coordination, collaboration, and accountability across executive departments and agencies (agencies) with regard to addressing the epidemic. It has also focused our Nation’s collective efforts on increasing the use of evidence-based approaches to prevention and care among populations and in regions where HIV is most concentrated.
Since the release of the Strategy, additional scientific discoveries have greatly enhanced our understanding of how to prevent and treat HIV. Accordingly, further Federal action is appropriate in response to these new developments. For example, a breakthrough research trial supported by the National Institutes of Health showed that initiating HIV treatment when the immune system was relatively healthy reduced HIV transmission by 96 percent. In addition, evidence suggests that early treatment may reduce HIV-related complications. These findings highlight the importance of prompt HIV diagnosis, and because of recent advances in HIV testing technology, HIV can be detected sooner and more rapidly than ever before.
Based on these and other data, recommendations for HIV testing and treatment have changed. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force now recommends that clinicians screen all individuals ages 15 to 65 years for HIV, and the Department of Health and Human Services Guidelines for Use of Antiretroviral Agents now recommends offering treatment to all adolescents and adults diagnosed with HIV.
Furthermore, ongoing implementation of the Affordable Care Act provides a historic opportunity for Americans to access affordable, quality health care. The Act is expanding access to recommended preventive services with no out-of-pocket costs, including HIV testing, and, beginning in 2014, insurance companies will not be able to deny coverage based on pre-existing conditions, including HIV. Starting October 1, 2013, Americans can select the coverage that best suits them through the new Health Insurance Marketplace, and coverage will begin January 1, 2014.
Despite progress in combating HIV, important work remains. Since the publication of the Strategy, data released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that there are significant gaps along the HIV care continuum—the sequential stages of care from being diagnosed to receiving optimal treatment. Nearly one-fifth of the estimated 1.1 million people living with HIV in the United States are undiagnosed; one-third are not linked to medical care; nearly two-thirds are not engaged in ongoing care; and only one-quarter have the virus effectively controlled, which is necessary to maintain long-term health and reduce risk of transmission to others.
In light of these data, we must further clarify and focus our national efforts to prevent and treat HIV infection. It is the policy of my Administration that agencies implementing the Strategy prioritize addressing the continuum of HIV care, including by accelerating efforts to increase HIV testing, services, and treatment along the continuum. This acceleration will enable us to meet the goals of the Strategy and move closer to an AIDS-free generation.
Sec. 2. Establishment of the HIV Care Continuum Initiative. There is established the HIV Care Continuum Initiative (Initiative), to be overseen by the Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy. The Initiative will mobilize and coordinate Federal efforts in response to recent advances regarding how to prevent and treat HIV infection. The Initiative will support further integration of HIV prevention and care efforts; promote expansion of successful HIV testing and service delivery models; encourage innovative approaches to addressing barriers to accessing testing and treatment; and ensure that Federal resources are appropriately focused on implementing evidence-based interventions that improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum.
Sec. 3. Establishment of the HIV Care Continuum Working Group. There is established the HIV Care Continuum Working Group (Working Group) to support the Initiative. The Working Group shall coordinate Federal efforts to improve outcomes nationally across the HIV care continuum.
(a) Membership. The Working Group shall be co-chaired by the Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy and the Secretary of Health and Human Services or designee (Co-Chairs). In addition to the Co-Chairs, the Working Group shall consist of representatives from:
(i) the Department of Justice;
(ii) the Department of Labor;
(iii) the Department of Health and Human Services;
(iv) the Department of Housing and Urban Development;
(v) the Department of Veterans Affairs;
(vi) the Office of Management and Budget; and
(vii) other agencies and offices, as designated by the Co-Chairs.
(b) Consultation. The Working Group shall consult with the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS, as appropriate.
(c) Functions. As part of the Initiative, the Working Group shall:
(i) request and review information from agencies describing efforts to improve testing, care, and treatment outcomes, and determine if there is appropriate emphasis on addressing the HIV care continuum in relation to other work concerning the domestic epidemic;
(ii) review research on improving outcomes along the HIV care continuum;
(iii) obtain input from Federal grantees, affected communities, and other stakeholders to inform strategies to improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum;
(iv) identify potential impediments to improving outcomes along the HIV care continuum, including for populations at greatest risk for HIV infection, based on the efforts undertaken pursuant to paragraphs (i), (ii), and (iii) of this subsection;
(v) identify opportunities to address issues identified pursuant to paragraph (iv) of this subsection, and thereby improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum;
(vi) recommend ways to integrate efforts to improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum with other evidence-based strategies to combat HIV; and
(vii) specify how to better align and coordinate Federal efforts, both within and across agencies, to improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum.
(d) Reporting.
(i) Within 180 days of the date of this order, the Working Group shall provide recommendations to the President on actions that agencies can take to improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum.
(ii) Thereafter, the Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy shall include, as part of the annual report to the President pursuant to section 1(b) of my memorandum of July 13, 2010 (Implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy), a report prepared by the Working Group on Government-wide progress in implementing this order. This report shall include a quantification of progress made in improving outcomes along the HIV care continuum.
Sec. 4. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or
(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.
(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.
Barack Obama.
Implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy

Memorandum of President of the United States, July 13, 2010, 75 F.R. 41687, provided:
Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies
As we approach 30 years from the onset of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States, new actions are needed to prevent HIV infection and better serve people living with HIV. The actions we take now will build upon a legacy of global leadership, national commitment, and sustained efforts on the part of Americans from all parts of the country and all walks of life to end the HIV epidemic in the United States and around the world. I am committed to renewing national leadership to fight HIV/AIDS here at home, as we continue our efforts to fight HIV/AIDS around the world. My Administration has engaged in an extensive process to engage Americans and listen to their ideas for improving our national response to HIV/AIDS.
Today I am releasing a National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States (Strategy) and a National HIV/AIDS Strategy Federal Implementation Plan (Federal Implementation Plan), which identifies specific actions to be taken by Federal agencies to implement the Strategy’s goals. While agencies already undertake many actions to address HIV/AIDS, successful implementation of the Strategy will require new levels of coordination, collaboration, and accountability. This will require the Federal Government to work in new ways across agency lines, as well as in enhanced and innovative partnerships with State, tribal, and local governments. Government cooperation at all levels, moreover, is not enough. Success will require the commitment of all parts of society, including businesses, faith communities, philanthropic organizations, scientific and medical communities, educational institutions, people living with HIV, and others. It is also necessary to sustain public commitment to ending the epidemic, and this calls for regular communications between governments at all levels to identify the challenges we face and report the progress we are making. To these ends, I hereby direct the following:
Section 1. Role of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP).
(a) The Director of the ONAP, in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), shall be responsible for setting the Administration’s domestic HIV/AIDS priorities and monitoring the implementation of the Strategy. The Director of the ONAP shall convene regular meetings with representatives of executive departments and agencies (agencies) to coordinate HIV/AIDS-related policies, programs, and activities.
(b) The Director of the ONAP shall annually report to the President on the implementation of the Strategy, including progress in meeting key targets and taking key actions identified in the Strategy and the Federal Implementation Plan.
Sec. 2. Lead Responsible Agencies. While the Strategy requires a Government-wide effort in order to succeed fully, certain agencies have primary responsibilities and competencies in implementing the Strategy.
(a) Designation of Lead Agencies. Lead agencies for implementing the Strategy shall be:
(i) the Department of Health and Human Services;
(ii) the Department of Justice;
(iii) the Department of Labor;
(iv) the Department of Housing and Urban Development;
(v) the Department of Veterans Affairs; and
(vi) the Social Security Administration.
(b) Lead Agency Implementation Plans. Within 150 days of the date of this memorandum, the head of each lead agency shall submit a report to the ONAP and the OMB on the agency’s operational plans for implementing the Strategy. The plans shall assign responsibilities to agency officials, designate reporting structures for actions identified in the Federal Implementation Plan, and identify other appropriate actions to advance the Strategy. The plans shall also include steps to strengthen coordination in planning, budgeting for, and evaluating domestic HIV/AIDS programs within and across agencies. Lead agencies are encouraged to consider, and reflect in their plans, steps to streamline grantee reporting requirements and funding announcements related to HIV/AIDS programs and activities.
(c) Ongoing Responsibilities of Lead Agencies. The head of each lead agency shall:
(i) designate an official responsible for coordinating the agency’s ongoing efforts to implement the Strategy;
(ii) develop a process for sharing progress reports, including status updates on achieving specific quantitative targets established by the Strategy, with relevant agencies and the ONAP on an annual basis, or at such other times as the ONAP requests; and
(iii) in consultation with the OMB, use the budget development process to prioritize programs and activities most critical to meeting the goals of the Strategy.
Sec. 3. Role of the Secretary of Health and Human Services. The Secretary of Health and Human Services (Secretary), or the Secretary’s designee, shall be responsible for improving coordination of domestic HIV/AIDS programs and activities across the Federal Government.
(a) Coordination within the Department of Health and Human Services. The Secretary, or the Secretary’s designee, shall develop and implement specific plans and procedures for improving intra-departmental coordination and collaboration on HIV/AIDS care, research, and prevention services.
(b) Coordination with Other Agencies. The Secretary, or the Secretary’s designee, shall be responsible for convening interagency efforts to improve coordination of HIV/AIDS programs and activities. This may include collaboration with governmental and nongovernmental entities to achieve the Federal Government’s implementation and research priorities in the areas of highest impact.
(c) Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA). PACHA, which was established by Executive Order 12963 of June 14, 1995 (Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS), as amended, shall monitor the implementation of the Strategy and make recommendations to the Secretary and to the Director of the ONAP, as appropriate, concerning implementation.
Sec. 4. Responsibilities of Other Agencies. All agencies that support HIV/AIDS programs and activities shall ensure that, to the extent permitted by law, they are meeting the goals of the Strategy.
(a) Department of Defense. Within 150 days of the date of this memorandum, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the ONAP and the OMB a plan for aligning the health-care services provided by the Department of Defense with the Strategy, to the extent feasible and permitted by law. The plan shall address, in particular, HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment.
(b) Department of State. Within 150 days of the date of this memorandum, the Secretary of State shall submit to the ONAP and the OMB recommendations for improving the Government-wide response to the domestic HIV/AIDS epidemic, based on lessons learned in implementing the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) program.
(c) Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Commission). Within 150 days of the date of this memorandum, the Chair of the Commission shall submit to the ONAP and the OMB recommendations for increasing employment opportunities for people living with HIV and a plan for addressing employment-related discrimination against people living with HIV, consistent with the Commission’s authorities and other applicable law.
Sec. 5. General Provisions.
(a) The heads of executive departments and agencies shall assist and provide information to the Director of the ONAP, consistent with applicable law, as may be necessary to implement the Strategy. Each agency shall bear its own expense for carrying out activities to implement the Strategy.
(b) Nothing in this memorandum shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) authority granted by law to a department or agency or the head thereof, or to other executive branch officials; or
(ii) functions of the Director of the OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.
(c) This memorandum shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(d) This memorandum is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.
Sec. 6. Publication. The Secretary is authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.
Barack Obama.
Establishing a Working Group on the Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence Against Women and Girls, and Gender-related Health Disparities

Memorandum of President of the United States, Mar. 30, 2012, 77 F.R. 20277, provided:
Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies
Throughout our country, the spread of HIV/AIDS has had a devastating impact on many communities. In the United States, there are approximately 1.2 million people living with HIV/AIDS, including more than 290,000 women. Women and girls now account for 24 percent of all diagnoses of HIV infection among United States adults and adolescents. The domestic epidemic disproportionately affects women of color, with African Americans and Latinas constituting over 70 percent of new HIV cases in women. The spread of HIV/AIDS is, in and of itself, a primary concern to my Administration. However, gender-based violence and gender-related health disparities cannot be ignored when addressing the domestic public health threat of HIV/AIDS. HIV/AIDS programs often ignore the biological differences and the social, economic, and cultural inequities that make women and girls more vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. In our country, women and girls are all too frequently victimized by domestic violence and sexual assault, which can lead to greater risk for acquiring this disease. Teenage girls and young women ages 16–24 face the highest rates of dating violence and sexual assault. In addition, challenges in accessing proper health care can present obstacles to addressing HIV/AIDS. Gender-based violence continues to be an underreported, common problem that, if ignored, increases risks for HIV and may prevent women and girls from seeking prevention, treatment, and health services.
My Administration is committed to improving efforts to understand and address the intersection of HIV/AIDS, violence against women and girls, and gender-related health disparities. To do so, executive departments and agencies (agencies) must build on their current work addressing the intersection of these issues by improving data collection, research, intervention strategies, and training. In order to develop a comprehensive Government-wide approach to these issues that is data-driven, uses effective prevention and care interventions, engages families and communities, supports research and data collection, and mobilizes both public and private sector resources, I direct the following:
Section 1. Working Group on the Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence Against Women and Girls, and Gender-related Health Disparities. There is established within the Executive Office of the President a Working Group on the Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence Against Women and Girls, and Gender-related Health Disparities (Working Group), to be co-chaired by the White House Advisor on Violence Against Women and the Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (Co-Chairs). Within 60 days of the date of this memorandum, the Co-Chairs shall convene the first meeting of the Working Group.
(a) In addition to the Co-Chairs, the Working Group shall consist of representatives from:
(i) the Department of Justice;
(ii) the Department of the Interior;
(iii) the Department of Health and Human Services;
(iv) the Department of Education;
(v) the Department of Homeland Security;
(vi) the Department of Veterans Affairs;
(vii) the Department of Housing and Urban Development; and
(viii) the Office of Management and Budget.
(b) The Working Group shall consult with the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS, as appropriate.
(c) The Department of State, the United States Agency for International Development, and the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Gender Technical Working Group shall act in an advisory capacity to the Working Group, providing information on lessons learned and evidence-based best practices based on their global experience addressing issues involving the intersection between HIV/AIDS and violence against women.
Sec. 2. Mission and Functions of the Working Group. (a) The Working Group shall coordinate agency efforts to address issues involving the intersection of HIV/AIDS, violence against women and girls, and gender-related health disparities. Such efforts shall include, but not be limited to:
(i) increasing government and public awareness of the need to address the intersection of HIV/AIDS, violence against women and girls, and gender-related health disparities, including sexual and reproductive health and access to health care;
(ii) sharing best practices, including demonstration projects and international work by agencies, as well as successful gender-specific strategies aimed at addressing risks that influence women’s and girls’ vulnerability to HIV infection and violence;
(iii) integrating sexual and reproductive health services, gender-based violence services, and HIV/AIDS services, where research demonstrates that doing so will result in improved and sustained health outcomes;
(iv) emphasizing evidence-based prevention activities that engage men and boys and highlight their role in the prevention of violence against women and HIV/AIDS infection;
(v) facilitating opportunities for partnerships among diverse organizations from the violence against women and girls, HIV/AIDS, and women’s health communities to address the intersection of these issues;
(vi) ensuring that the needs of vulnerable and underserved groups are considered in any efforts to address issues involving the intersection of HIV/AIDS, violence against women and girls, and gender-related health disparities;
(vii) promoting research to better understand the intersection of the biological, behavioral, and social sciences bases for the relationship between increased HIV/AIDS risk, domestic violence, and gender-related health disparities; and
(viii) prioritizing, as appropriate, the efforts described in paragraphs (a)(i)–(vii) of this section with respect to women and girls of color, who represent the majority of females living with and at risk for HIV infection in the United States.
(b) The Working Group shall annually provide the President recommendations for updating the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. In addition, the Working Group shall provide information on:
(i) coordinated actions taken by the Working Group to meet its objectives and identify areas where the Federal Government has achieved integration and coordination in addressing the intersection of HIV/AIDS, violence against women and girls, and gender-related health disparities;
(ii) alternative means of making available gender-sensitive health care for women and girls through the integration of HIV/AIDS prevention and care services with intimate partner violence prevention and counseling as well as mental health and trauma services;
(iii) specific, evidence-based goals for addressing HIV among women, including HIV-related disparities among women of color, to inform the National HIV/AIDS Strategy Implementation Plan (for its biannual review);
(iv) research and data collection needs regarding HIV/AIDS, violence against women and girls, and gender-related health disparities to help develop more comprehensive data and targeted research (disaggregated by sex, gender, and gender identity, where practicable); and
(v) existing partnerships and potential areas of collaboration with other public or nongovernmental actors, taking into consideration the types of implementation or research objectives that other public or nongovernmental actors may be particularly well-situated to accomplish.
Sec. 3. Outreach. Consistent with the objectives of this memorandum and applicable law, the Working Group, in addition to regular meetings, shall conduct outreach with representatives of private and nonprofit organizations, State, tribal, and local government agencies, elected officials, and other interested persons to assist the Working Group in developing a detailed set of recommendations.
Sec. 4. General Provisions. (a) The heads of agencies shall assist and provide information to the Working Group, consistent with applicable law, as may be necessary to carry out the functions of the Working Group. Each agency and office shall bear its own expense for carrying out activities related to the Working Group.
(b) Nothing in this memorandum shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:
(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or
(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.
(c) This memorandum shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.
(d) This memorandum is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.
(e) The Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.
Barack Obama.

 

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