48 U.S. Code § 734 - United States laws extended to Puerto Rico; internal revenue receipts covered into treasury

The statutory laws of the United States not locally inapplicable, except as hereinbefore or hereinafter otherwise provided, shall have the same force and effect in Puerto Rico as in the United States, except the internal revenue laws other than those contained in the Philippine Trade Act of 1946 [22 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.] or the Philippine Trade Agreement Revision Act of 1955 [22 U.S.C. 1371 et seq.]: Provided, however, That after May 1, 1946, all taxes collected under the internal revenue laws of the United States on articles produced in Puerto Rico and transported to the United States, or consumed in the island shall be covered into the treasury of Puerto Rico.

Source

(Mar. 2, 1917, ch. 145, § 9,39 Stat. 954; May 17, 1932, ch. 190, 47 Stat. 158; Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, title V, § 513,60 Stat. 158; Aug. 1, 1955, ch. 438, title III, § 308,69 Stat. 427.)
References in Text

The Philippine Trade Act of 1946, referred to in text, is act Apr. 30, 1946, ch. 244, 60 Stat. 141, as amended, which is classified principally to subchapters I to IV (§ 1251 et seq.) of chapter 15 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1354 of Title 22 and Tables.
The Philippine Trade Agreement Revision Act of 1955, referred to in text, is act Aug. 1, 1955, ch. 438, 69 Stat. 413, which is classified generally to subchapter IV–A (§ 1371 et seq.) of chapter 15 of Title 22. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see Short Title note set out under section 1373 of Title 22 and Tables.
The internal revenue laws of the United States, referred to in text, are classified generally to Title 26, Internal Revenue Code.
Prior Provisions

Provisions similar to those in this section were contained in act Apr. 12, 1900, ch. 191, § 14,31 Stat. 80, except that the words “which, in view of the provisions of section three, shall not have force and effect in Porto Rico” were contained in lieu of the proviso. As to section 3 of act Apr. 12, 1900, see section 738 of this title and notes thereunder.
Amendments

1955—Act Aug. 1, 1955, inserted “or the Philippine Trade Agreement Revision Act of 1955”.
1946—Act Apr. 30, 1946, inserted “other than those contained in the Philippine Trade Act of 1946”.
Change of Name

“Puerto Rico” substituted in text for “Porto Rico” pursuant to act May 17, 1932, which is classified to section 731a of this title.
Effective Date of 1955 Amendment

Amendment by act Aug. 1, 1955, effective Jan. 1, 1956, see section 301(b) of act Aug. 1, 1955, set out as an Effective Date note under section 1373 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse.
Effective Date of 1946 Amendment

Amendment by act Apr. 30, 1946, effective on day after date of its enactment, Apr. 30, 1946, see section 512 of act Apr. 30, 1946, set out as an Effective Date note under section 1354 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse.
Ex. Ord. No. 9909. Exempting District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico and the Department of Justice From Making Reports Required by This Section

Ex. Ord. No. 9909, eff. Dec. 9, 1947, 12 F.R. 8291, provided:
By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 49b(2) of the Organic Act of Puerto Rico, as amended by section 6 of the Act of August 5, 1947, Public Law 362, 80th Congress [section 793b of this title], it is hereby ordered that the District Court of the United States for Puerto Rico and the Department of Justice shall be exempt from making the reports to the Coordinator of Federal Agencies in Puerto Rico which are provided for in such section.
Harry S. Truman.
Ex. Ord. No. 10005. Establishment of President’s Advisory Commission on Relation of Federal Laws to Puerto Rico

Ex. Ord. No. 10005, eff. Oct. 5, 1948, 13 F.R. 5854, provided:
WHEREAS section 9 of the Organic Act of Puerto Rico, 39 Stat. 954 [this section], provides that “the statutory laws of the United States not locally inapplicable, except as hereinbefore or hereinafter otherwise provided, shall have the same force and effect in Puerto Rico as in the United States”; and
WHEREAS section 49b(3) of the said Act, which was added by section 6 of the act of August 5, 1947, 61 Stat. 772 [section 793b of this title], provides that “the President of the United States may, from time to time, after hearing, promulgate Executive orders expressly excepting Puerto Rico from the application of any Federal law, not expressly declared by Congress to be applicable to Puerto Rico, which is contemplated by section 9 of this act [this section] is inapplicable by reason of local conditions”:
NOW, THEREFORE, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the said Organic Act of Puerto Rico, and as President of the United States, it is ordered as follows:
1. There is hereby created a commission to be known as the President’s Advisory Commission on the Relation of Federal Laws to Puerto Rico, which shall be composed of nine members to be designated by the President and to serve without compensation.
2. The Commission shall from time to time make recommendations to the President concerning the exercise of his power under section 49b(3) of the Organic Act of Puerto Rico [section 793b of this title] to exempt Puerto Rico from the application of Federal laws. To that end, the Commission is authorized to examine into, and to hold hearings on, the inapplicability of Federal laws to Puerto Rico by reason of local conditions.
3. All executive departments and agencies of the Federal Government are authorized and directed to cooperate with the Commission in its work and to furnish the Commission such information as the Commission may require in the performance of its duties.
4. The Commission shall continue to exist until the President terminates its existence by Executive order.
Harry S. Truman.
Administrative Treatment of Puerto Rico as a State

Memorandum of President of the United States, Nov. 30, 1992, 57 F.R. 57093, provided:
Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies
Puerto Rico is a self-governing territory of the United States whose residents have been United States citizens since 1917 and have fought valorously in five wars in the defense of our Nation and the liberty of others.
On July 25, 1952, as a consequence of steps taken by both the United States Government and the people of Puerto Rico voting in a referendum, a new constitution was promulgated establishing the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The Commonwealth structure provides for self-government in respect of internal affairs and administration, subject to relevant portions of the Constitution and the laws of the United States. As long as Puerto Rico is a territory, however, the will of its people regarding their political status should be ascertained periodically by means of a general right of referendum or specific referenda sponsored either by the United States Government or the Legislature of Puerto Rico.
Because Puerto Rico’s degree of constitutional self-government, population, and size set it apart from other areas also subject to Federal jurisdiction under Article IV, section 3, clause 2 of the Constitution, I hereby direct all Federal departments, agencies, and officials, to the extent consistent with the Constitution and the laws of the United States, henceforward to treat Puerto Rico administratively as if it were a State, except insofar as doing so with respect to an existing Federal program or activity would increase or decrease Federal receipts or expenditures, or would seriously disrupt the operation of such program or activity. With respect to a Federal program or activity for which no fiscal baseline has been established, this memorandum shall not be construed to require that such program or activity be conducted in a way that increases or decreases Federal receipts or expenditures relative to the level that would obtain if Puerto Rico were treated other than as a State.
If any matters arise involving the fundamentals of Puerto Rico’s status, they shall be referred to the Office of the President.
This guidance shall remain in effect until Federal legislation is enacted altering the current status of Puerto Rico in accordance with the freely expressed wishes of the people of Puerto Rico.
The memorandum for the heads of executive departments and agencies on this subject, issued July 25, 1961 [26 F.R. 6695], is hereby rescinded.
This memorandum shall be published in the Federal Register.
George Bush.

 

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