7 U.S. Code § 5925 - High-priority research and extension initiatives

(a) Competitive specialized research and extension grants authorized
The Secretary of Agriculture (referred to in this section as the “Secretary”) may make competitive grants to support research and extension activities specified in subsections (d) through (g) of this section. The Secretary shall make the grants in consultation with the National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board.
(b) Administration
(1) In general
Except as otherwise provided in this section, paragraphs (4), (7), (8), and (11)(B) of subsection (b) ofsection 450i of this title shall apply with respect to the making of grants under this section.
(2) Use of task forces
To facilitate the making of research and extension grants under this section in the research and extension areas specified in subsections (d) through (g) of this section, the Secretary may appoint a task force for each such area to make recommendations to the Secretary. The Secretary may not incur costs in excess of $1,000 for any fiscal year in connection with each task force established under this paragraph.
(c) Partnerships encouraged
Following the completion of a peer review process for grant proposals received under this section, the Secretary shall provide a priority to those grant proposals, found in the peer review process to be scientifically meritorious, that involve the cooperation of multiple entities.
(d) High-priority research and extension areas
(1) Dairy financial risk management research and extension
Research and extension grants may be made under this section for the purpose of providing research, development, or education materials, information, and outreach programs regarding risk management strategies for dairy producers and for dairy cooperatives and other processors and marketers of milk.
(2) Potato research and extension
Research and extension grants may be made under this section for the purpose of developing and evaluating new strains of potatoes that are resistant to blight and other diseases, as well as insects. Emphasis may be placed on developing potato varieties that lend themselves to innovative marketing approaches.
(3) Wood use research and extension
Research and extension grants may be made under this section for the purpose of developing new uses for wood from underused tree species as well as investigating methods of modifying wood and wood fibers to produce better building materials.
(4) Bighorn and domestic sheep disease mechanisms
Research and extension grants may be made under this section to conduct research relating to the health status of (including the presence of infectious diseases in) bighorn and domestic sheep under range conditions.
(5) Agricultural development in the American-Pacific region
Research and extension grants may be made under this section to support food and agricultural science at a consortium of land-grant institutions in the American-Pacific region.
(6) Tropical and subtropical agricultural research
Research grants may be made under this section, in equal dollar amounts to the Caribbean and Pacific Basins, to support tropical and subtropical agricultural research, including pest and disease research, at the land-grant institutions in the Caribbean and Pacific regions.
(7) Women and minorities in stem fields
Research and extension grants may be made under this section to increase participation by women and underrepresented minorities from rural areas in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, with priority given to eligible institutions that carry out continuing programs funded by the Secretary.
(8) Alfalfa and forage research program
Research and extension grants may be made under this section for the purpose of studying improvements in alfalfa and forage yields, biomass and persistence, pest pressures, the bioenergy potential of alfalfa and other forages, and systems to reduce losses during harvest and storage.
(9) Coffee plant health initiative
Research and extension grants may be made under this section for the purposes of—
(A) developing and disseminating science-based tools and treatments to combat the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei); and
(B) establishing an areawide integrated pest management program in areas affected by, or areas at risk of, being affected by the coffee berry borer.
(10) Corn, soybean meal, cereal grains, and grain byproducts research and extension
Research and extension grants may be made under this section for the purpose of carrying out or enhancing research to improve the digestibility, nutritional value, and efficiency of the use of corn, soybean meal, cereal grains, and grain byproducts for the poultry and food animal production industries.
(e) Pulse crop health initiative
(1) Definitions
In this subsection:
(A) Initiative
The term “Initiative” means the pulse crop health initiative established by paragraph (2).
(B) Pulse crop
The term “pulse crop” means dry beans, dry peas, lentils, and chickpeas.
(2) Establishment
The Secretary shall carry out a pulse crop health competitive research and extension initiative to address the critical needs of the pulse crop industry by developing and disseminating science-based tools and information, including—
(A) research conducted with respect to pulse crops in the areas of health and nutrition, such as—
(i) pulse crop diets and the ability of such diets to reduce obesity and associated chronic disease; and
(ii) the underlying mechanisms of the health benefits of pulse crop consumption;
(B) research related to the functionality of pulse crops, such as—
(i) improving the functional properties of pulse crops and pulse crop fractions; and
(ii) developing new and innovative technologies to improve pulse crops as an ingredient in food products;
(C) research conducted with respect to pulse crops for purposes of enhancing sustainability and global food security, such as—
(i) improving pulse crop productivity, nutrient density, and phytonutrient content using plant breeding, genetics, and genomics;
(ii) improving pest and disease management, including resistance to pests and diseases; and
(iii) improving nitrogen fixation and water use efficiency to reduce the carbon and energy footprint of agriculture;
(D) the optimization of systems used in producing pulse crops to reduce water usage; and
(E) education and technical assistance programs with respect to pulse crops, such as programs—
(i) providing technical expertise to help food companies include pulse crops in innovative and healthy food; and
(ii) establishing an educational program to encourage pulse crop consumption in the United States.
(3) Administration
Paragraphs (4), (7), (8), and (11)(B) of subsection (b) ofsection 450i of this title shall apply with respect to the making of a competitive grant under this subsection.
(4) Priorities
In making competitive grants under this subsection, the Secretary shall provide a higher priority to projects that—
(A) are multistate, multiinstitutional, and multidisciplinary; and
(B) include explicit mechanisms to communicate results to the pulse crop industry and the public.
(5) Authorization of appropriations
There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this subsection $25,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018.
(f) Training coordination for food and agriculture protection
(1) In general
The Secretary shall make a competitive grant to, or enter into a contract or a cooperative agreement with, an eligible entity (described in paragraph (2)) for purposes of establishing an internationally integrated training system to enhance the protection of the food supply in the United States, to be known as the “Comprehensive Food Safety Training Network” (referred to in this subsection as the “Network”).
(2) Eligibility
(A) In general
For purposes of this subsection, an eligible entity is a multiinstitutional consortium that includes—
(i) a nonprofit institution that provides food safety protection training; and
(ii) one or more training centers in institutions of higher education (as defined in section 1001 of title 20) that have demonstrated expertise in developing and delivering community-based training in food supply and agricultural safety and defense.
(B) Collective consideration
The Secretary may consider such consortium collectively and not on an institution-by-institution basis.
(3) Duties of eligible entity
As a condition of receiving a competitive grant or entering into a contract or a cooperative agreement with the Secretary under this subsection, the eligible entity, in cooperation with the Secretary, shall establish and maintain the Network, including by—
(A) providing basic, technical, management, and leadership training (including by developing curricula) to regulatory and public health officials, producers, processors, and other agribusinesses;
(B) serving as the hub for the administration of the Network;
(C) implementing a standardized national curriculum to ensure the consistent delivery of quality training throughout the United States;
(D) building and overseeing a nationally recognized instructor cadre to ensure the availability of highly qualified instructors;
(E) reviewing training proposed through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture and other relevant Federal agencies that report to the Secretary on the quality and content of proposed and existing courses;
(F) assisting Federal agencies in the implementation of food safety protection training requirements including requirements under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), the Agricultural Act of 2014, and any provision of law amended by such Act; and
(G) performing evaluation and outcome-based studies to provide to the Secretary information on the effectiveness and impact of training and metrics on jurisdictions and sectors within the food safety system.
(4) Membership
An eligible entity may alter the consortium membership to meet specific training expertise needs.
(5) Authorization of appropriations
There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this subsection $20,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2014 through 2018, to remain available until expended.
(g) Pollinator protection
(1) Research and extension
(A) Grants
Research and extension grants may be made under this section—
(i) to survey and collect data on bee colony production and health;
(ii) to investigate pollinator biology, immunology, ecology, genomics, and bioinformatics;
(iii) to conduct research on various factors that may be contributing to or associated with colony collapse disorder, and other serious threats to the health of honey bees and other pollinators, including—
(I) parasites and pathogens of pollinators; and
(II) the sublethal effects of insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides on honey bees and native and managed pollinators;
(iv) to develop mitigative and preventative measures to improve native and managed pollinator health; and
(v) to promote the health of honey bees and native pollinators through habitat conservation and best management practices.
(B) Authorization of appropriations
There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this paragraph $10,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2018.
(2) Department of Agriculture capacity and infrastructure
(A) In general
The Secretary shall, to the maximum extent practicable, increase the capacity and infrastructure of the Department—
(i) to address colony collapse disorder and other long-term threats to pollinator health, including the hiring of additional personnel; and
(ii) to conduct research on colony collapse disorder and other pollinator issues at the facilities of the Department.
(B) Authorization of appropriations
There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this paragraph $7,250,000 for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2018.
(3) Honey bee surveillance
There is authorized to be appropriated to conduct a nationwide honey bee pest, pathogen, health, and population status surveillance program $2,750,000 for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2018.
(4) Consultation
The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of the Interior and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, shall publish guidance on enhancing pollinator health and the long-term viability of populations of pollinators, including recommendations related to—
(A) allowing for managed honey bees to forage on National Forest System lands where compatible with other natural resource management priorities; and
(B) planting and maintaining managed honey bee and native pollinator foraging on National Forest System lands where compatible with other natural resource management priorities.
(5) Annual report on response to honey bee colony collapse disorder
The Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Agriculture of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry of the Senate an annual report—
(A) describing the progress made by the Department of Agriculture in—
(i) investigating the cause or causes of honey bee colony collapse and honey bee health disorders;
(ii) finding appropriate strategies, including best management practices  [1] to reduce colony loss; and
(iii) addressing the decline of managed honey bees and native pollinators;
(B) assessing Federal efforts to mitigate pollinator losses and threats to the United States commercial beekeeping industry; and
(C) providing recommendations to Congress regarding how to better coordinate Federal agency efforts to address the decline of managed honey bees and native pollinators.
(h) Authorization of appropriations
There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as are necessary to carry out this section for each of fiscal years 1999 through 2018.


[1]  So in original. Probably should be followed by a comma.

Source

(Pub. L. 101–624, title XVI, § 1672,Nov. 28, 1990, 104 Stat. 3770; Pub. L. 102–237, title IV, §§ 406, 407(11),Dec. 13, 1991, 105 Stat. 1864, 1865; Pub. L. 104–127, title VIII, §§ 836, 863, 888,Apr. 4, 1996, 110 Stat. 1169, 1174, 1180; Pub. L. 105–185, title II, § 242,June 23, 1998, 112 Stat. 549; Pub. L. 107–171, title VII, §§ 7119, 7208(b),May 13, 2002, 116 Stat. 434, 442; Pub. L. 108–465, title III, § 302,Dec. 21, 2004, 118 Stat. 3885; Pub. L. 110–234, title VII, §§ 7203, 7204,May 22, 2008, 122 Stat. 1233; Pub. L. 110–246, § 4(a), title VII, §§ 7203, 7204,June 18, 2008, 122 Stat. 1664, 1994; Pub. L. 113–79, title VII, §§ 7128(b)(2)(C), 7209,Feb. 7, 2014, 128 Stat. 879, 881.)
References in Text

The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, referred to in subsec. (f)(3)(F), is act June 25, 1938, ch. 675, 52 Stat. 1040, which is classified generally to chapter 9 (§ 301 et seq.) of Title 21, Food and Drugs. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see section 301 of Title 21 and Tables.
The Agricultural Act of 2014, referred to in subsec. (f)(3)(F), is Pub. L. 113–79, Feb. 7, 2014, 128 Stat. 649. For complete classification of this Act to the Code, see see Short Title note set out under section 9001 of this title and Tables.
Codification

Pub. L. 110–234and Pub. L. 110–246made identical amendments to this section. The amendments by Pub. L. 110–234were repealed by section 4(a) ofPub. L. 110–246.
Amendments

2014—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(1), substituted “subsections (d) through (g)” for “subsections (e) through (i)”.
Subsec. (b)(2). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(2), substituted “subsections (d) through (g)” for “subsections (e) through (i)”.
Subsec. (c). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C), redesignatedsubsec. (d) as (c), and struck out former subsec. (c) which related to matching funds requirement.
Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(5), added pars. (9) and (10), redesignated pars. (6), (9), (10), (44), (45), (46), (49), and (50) as (1) to (8), respectively, and struck out former pars. (1) to (5), (7), (8), (11) to (43), (47), (48), (51), and (52), which related to certain research and extension grants.
Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C)(ii), redesignatedsubsec. (e) as (d).
Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(6), added subsec. (e) and struck out former subsec. (e) which related to imported fire ant control, management, and eradication.
Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C)(ii), redesignatedsubsec. (f) as (e).
Subsec. (f). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(7), added subsec. (f) and struck out former subsec. (f) which related to formosan termite research and eradication.
Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C)(ii), redesignatedsubsec. (g) as (f). Former subsec. (f) redesignated (e).
Subsec. (g). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C)(ii), redesignatedsubsec. (h) as (g).
Subsec. (g)(1)(B), (2)(B). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(A), substituted “2018” for “2012”.
Subsec. (g)(3). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(A), (B), struck out “pest and pathogen” after “bee” in heading and substituted “pest, pathogen, health, and population status surveillance” for “pest and pathogen surveillance” and “2018” for “2012” in text.
Subsec. (g)(4). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(D), added par. (4).Former par. (4) redesignated (5).
Subsec. (g)(5). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(E)(i), (ii), substituted “annual report—” for “annual report” in introductory provisions, inserted subpar. (A) designation before “describing”, redesignated former subpars. (A) and (B) as cls. (i) and (ii) of subpar. (A), respectively, and realigned margins.
Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(C), redesignated par. (4) as (5).
Subsec. (g)(5)(A)(i). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(E)(iii)(I), inserted “and honey bee health disorders” after “collapse”.
Subsec. (g)(5)(A)(ii). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(E)(iv)(I), inserted “, including best management practices” after “strategies”
Subsec. (g)(5)(A)(iii). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(E)(iii)(II), (iv)(II), (v), added cl. (iii).
Subsec. (g)(5)(B), (C). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(8)(E)(vi), added subpars. (B) and (C).
Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(9), substituted “2018” for “2012”.
Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(3), (4), redesignatedsubsec. (i) as (h) and struck out former subsec. (h) which related to regional centers of excellence.
Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C)(ii), redesignatedsubsec. (i) as (h).
Subsec. (i). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7209(4), redesignatedsubsec. (i) as (h).
Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C)(ii), redesignatedsubsec. (j) as (i).
Subsec. (j). Pub. L. 113–79, § 7128(b)(2)(C)(ii), redesignatedsubsec. (j) as (i).
2008—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 110–246, § 7204(b)(1), substituted “subsections (e) through (i)” for “subsections (e), (f), and (g)” in first sentence.
Subsec. (b)(1). Pub. L. 110–246, § 7204(b)(2)(A), substituted “paragraphs (4), (7), (8), and (11)(B)” for “paragraphs (1), (6), (7), and (11)”.
Subsec. (b)(2). Pub. L. 110–246, § 7204(b)(2)(B), substituted “subsections (e) through (i)” for “subsection (e)”.
Subsec. (d). Pub. L. 110–246, § 7203, substituted “shall” for “may”.
Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 110–246, § 7204(a)(1)(B)–(D), redesignated pars. (2), (3), (5), (6), (9) to (14), (16), (18) to (20), (22), (24), (25), (28) to (31), (33), (35) to (40), and (44) as (1) to (29), respectively, added pars. (30) to (52), and struck out former pars. (1), (4), (7), (8), (15), (17), (21), (23), (26), (27), (32), (34), (41) to (43), and (45), which related to research on the brown citrus aphid and the citrus tristeza virus, uses of mesquite, red meat safety, sorghum ergot eradication, development of the low-bush blueberry, wild pampas grass control, genetic aspects of scrapie in sheep, forestry, wind erosion, crop loss models, harvesting productivity for fruits and vegetables, agricultural marketing, beef cattle genetics, ingestion of dairy pipeline cleaner, genetic resource conservation, and improvement of specialty crop production, respectively.
Subsec. (e)(3). Pub. L. 110–246, § 7204(a)(1)(A), substituted “, improving, and eventually commercializing, alfatoxin controls in corn and other affected agricultural products and crops” for “and controlling aflatoxin in the food and feed chains”.
Subsecs. (h) to (j). Pub. L. 110–246, § 7204(a)(2)–(4), added subsecs. (h) and (i), redesignated former subsec. (h) as (j), and substituted “2012” for “2007” in subsec. (j).
2004—Subsec. (e)(45). Pub. L. 108–465added par. (45).
2002—Subsec. (e)(25) to (44). Pub. L. 107–171, § 7208(b), added pars. (25) to (44).
Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 107–171, § 7119, substituted “2007” for “2002”.
1998—Pub. L. 105–185amended section catchline and text generally, substituting present provisions for provisions which in subsecs. (a) to (f) which authorized specialized research programs relating to, respectively, brown citrus aphid and citrus tristeza virus, ethanol, aflatoxin, mesquite, prickly pear, and deer tick ecology and related research, and for provisions in subsec. (g) subjecting research to peer review, setting limitation on use of funds, and providing for general eligibility to participate in programs.
1996—Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 104–127, §§ 863(1), 888, added subsec. (a) and struck out heading and text of former subsec. (a). Text read as follows: “The Secretary of Agriculture is encouraged to fund research for the development of technology which will ascertain the lean content of animal carcasses to be used for human consumption.”
Subsecs. (d)(4), (e)(4). Pub. L. 104–127, § 836, substituted “1997” for “1995”.
Subsec. (f). Pub. L. 104–127, § 863, redesignatedsubsec. (i) as (f) and struck out heading and text of former subsec. (f). Text read as follows:
“(1) Research required.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall establish and carry out a program to make grants to colleges and universities for research relating to immunoassay used—
“(A) to detect agricultural pesticide residues on agricultural commodities for human consumption; and
“(B) to diagnose animal and plant diseases.
“(2) Preference.—In making grants under this subsection, the Secretary may give preference to those colleges and universities that, as of November 28, 1990, are conducting research described in this subsection.”
Subsec. (g). Pub. L. 104–127, § 863, redesignatedsubsec. (k) as (g) and struck out heading and text of former subsec. (g). Text read as follows: “The Secretary shall make research and extension grants available for the development of agricultural production and marketing systems that will service niche markets located in nearby metropolitan areas. In awarding such grants, the Secretary shall pay particular attention to areas—
“(1) with a high concentration of small farm operations; and
“(2) that experience difficulty in delivering products to market due to geographic isolation.”
Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 104–127, § 863(1), struck out subsec. (h) which provided that Secretary of Agriculture may establish and carry out a program to conduct research on disease of scrapie in sheep and goats.
Subsec. (i). Pub. L. 104–127, §§ 836, 863(2), redesignatedsubsec. (i) as (f) and substituted “1997” for “1995”.
Subsec. (j). Pub. L. 104–127, § 863(1), struck out heading and text of subsec. (j). Text read as follows: “The Secretary of Agriculture may—
“(1) conduct fundamental and applied research related to the development of new commercial products derived from natural plant materials for industrial, medical, and agricultural applications; and
“(2) participate with colleges and universities, other Federal agencies, and private sector entities in conducting such research.”
Subsec. (k). Pub. L. 104–127, § 863(2), redesignatedsubsec. (k) as (g).
1991—Subsec. (c). Pub. L. 102–237, § 407(11), redesignated pars. (A) to (I) as (1) to (9), respectively.
Subsec. (i). Pub. L. 102–237, § 406(1), substituted “Secretary of Agriculture, acting through the Cooperative State Research Service, to make competitive grants” for “Agricultural Research Service”.
Subsec. (k)(1). Pub. L. 102–237, § 406(2), substituted “Research” for “Except for research funded under subsection (i), research”.
Effective Date of 2008 Amendment

Amendment of this section and repeal of Pub. L. 110–234by Pub. L. 110–246effective May 22, 2008, the date of enactment of Pub. L. 110–234, see section 4 ofPub. L. 110–246, set out as an Effective Date note under section 8701 of this title.
Methyl Bromide Alternatives

Pub. L. 108–465, title III, § 301,Dec. 21, 2004, 118 Stat. 3885, provided that:
“(a) Priority.—The Secretary of Agriculture shall elevate the priority of current methyl bromide alternative research and extension activities and reexamine the risks and benefits of extending the phase-out deadline in effect on the date of the enactment of this Act [Dec. 21, 2004], including the estimated cost to the grower or processor associated with any alternatives proposed.
“(b) Authorization of Appropriations.—For each of the fiscal years 2005 through 2009, there is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Agriculture $5,000,000 to carry out this section.”

 

LII has no control over and does not endorse any external Internet site that contains links to or references LII.