constitutional law

Commander in Chief Powers

Article II Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution, the Commander in Chief clause, states that "[t]he President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States."

menu of sources

Books

Louis Fisher, Constitutional Conflicts between Congress and the President 249-272 (2007).

Federal Material

U.S. Constitution

Federal Law

Emergency Powers

menu of sources

 

Books

 

Louis Fisher, Constitutional Conflicts between Congress and the President 249-272 (2007). 

 

Federal Material

 

U.S. Constitution

 

Federal Judicial Decisions

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

War Powers

Article I, Section 8, Clause 11 of the U.S. Constitution grants Congress the power to declare war. The President, meanwhile, derives the power to direct the military after a Congressional declaration of war from Article II, Section 2, which names the President Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces.

menu of sources

Federal Material

U.S. Constitution

Federal Law

Books

Louis Fisher, Constitutional Conflicts between Congress and the President, p. 249-272 (2007).

keywords: 

Second Amendment

The Second Amendment of the United States Constitution reads: "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." Such language has created considerable debate regarding the Amendment's intended scope.

menu of sources

Federal Material

U.S. Constitution

Books

Erwin Chemerinsky, Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies 26-28 (2006).

Federal Decisions:

 

Federalism

Federalism is a system of government in which the same territory is controlled by two levels of government. Generally, an overarching national government governs issues that affect the entire country, and smaller subdivisions govern issues of local concern. Both the national government and the smaller political subdivisions have the power to make laws and both have a certain level of autonomy from each other. The United States has a federal system of governance consisting of the national or federal government, and the government of the individual states.

Executive power

executive power: an overview

In its first three articles, the U.S. Constitution outlines the branches of the U.S. Government, the powers that they contain and the limitations to which they must adhere. Article II outlines the duties of the Executive Branch.

Elections

 

election law: an overview

Citizens make choices by voting in elections. Two types of elections exist: general elections and special elections. A general election occurs at a regularly scheduled interval as mandated by law. A special election would be held when something arises that does not arise on a regular basis or routine. For instance, if an elected-office suddenly becomes vacant or a legislature wants to put a referendum before the voters, then they can use a special election.

menu of sources

Federal Material

U.S. Constitution

Federal Statutes

Federal Regulations

  • Code of Federal Regulations: Title 11 - Federal Elections

Federal Judicial Decisions

State Material

State Statutes

State Judicial Decisions

State Information

Other References

other topics

Related LII Resources

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - constitutional law