19 CFR § 351.525 - Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and attribution of subsidy to a product.

§ 351.525 Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and attribution of subsidy to a product.

(a) Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate. The Secretary will calculate an ad valorem subsidy rate by dividing the amount of the benefit allocated to the period of investigation or review by the sales value during the same period of the product or products to which the Secretary attributes the subsidy under paragraph (b) of this section. Normally, the Secretary will determine the sales value of a product on an f.o.b. (port) basis (if the product is exported) or on an f.o.b. (factory) basis (if the product is sold for domestic consumption). However, if the Secretary determines that countervailable subsidies are provided with respect to the movement of a product from the port or factory to the place of destination (e.g., freight or insurance costs are subsidized), the Secretary may make appropriate adjustments to the sales value used in the denominator.

(b) Attribution of subsidies -

(1) In general. In attributing a subsidy to one or more products, the Secretary will apply the rules set forth in paragraphs (b)(2) through (b)(7) of this section.

(2) Export subsidies. The Secretary will attribute an export subsidy only to products exported by a firm.

(3) Domestic subsidies. The Secretary will attribute a domestic subsidy to all products sold by a firm, including products that are exported.

(4) Subsidies tied to a particular market. If a subsidy is tied to sales to a particular market, the Secretary will attribute the subsidy only to products sold by the firm to that market.

(5) Subsidies tied to a particular product.

(i) In general. If a subsidy is tied to the production or sale of a particular product, the Secretary will attribute the subsidy only to that product.

(ii) Exception. If a subsidy is tied to production of an input product, then the Secretary will attribute the subsidy to both the input and downstream products produced by a corporation.

(6) Corporations with cross-ownership.

(i) In general. The Secretary normally will attribute a subsidy to the products produced by the corporation that received the subsidy.

(ii) Corporations producing the same product. If two (or more) corporations with cross-ownership produce the subject merchandise, the Secretary will attribute the subsidies received by either or both corporations to the products produced by both corporations.

(iii) Holding or parent companies. If the firm that received a subsidy is a holding company, including a parent company with its own operations, the Secretary will attribute the subsidy to the consolidated sales of the holding company and its subsidiaries. However, if the Secretary finds that the holding company merely served as a conduit for the transfer of the subsidy from the government to a subsidiary of the holding company, the Secretary will attribute the subsidy to products sold by the subsidiary.

(iv) Input suppliers. If there is cross-ownership between an input supplier and a downstream producer, and production of the input product is primarily dedicated to production of the downstream product, the Secretary will attribute subsidies received by the input producer to the combined sales of the input and downstream products produced by both corporations (excluding the sales between the two corporations).

(v) Transfer of subsidy between corporations with cross-ownership producing different products. In situations where paragraphs (b)(6)(i) through (iv) of this section do not apply, if a corporation producing non-subject merchandise received a subsidy and transferred the subsidy to a corporation with cross-ownership, the Secretary will attribute the subsidy to products sold by the recipient of the transferred subsidy.

(vi) Cross-ownership defined. Cross-ownership exists between two or more corporations where one corporation can use or direct the individual assets of the other corporation(s) in essentially the same ways it can use its own assets. Normally, this standard will be met where there is a majority voting ownership interest between two corporations or through common ownership of two (or more) corporations.

(7) Multinational firms. If the firm that received a subsidy has production facilities in two or more countries, the Secretary will attribute the subsidy to products produced by the firm within the country of the government that granted the subsidy. However, if it is demonstrated that the subsidy was tied to more than domestic production, the Secretary will attribute the subsidy to multinational production.

(c) Trading companies. Benefits from subsidies provided to a trading company which exports subject merchandise shall be cumulated with benefits from subsidies provided to the firm which is producing subject merchandise that is sold through the trading company, regardless of whether the trading company and the producing firm are affiliated.

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