26 CFR § 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

§ 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

(a) Property not entirely subject to jurisdiction of one regulatory body -

(1) In general. If a taxpayer which uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by a regulatory body having jurisdiction over less than all of its property to use, or not to use, a method of regulated accounting (i.e., normalization or flow-through), such taxpayer shall be considered as using, or not using, such method of regulated accounting only with respect to property subject to the jurisdiction of such regulatory body. In the case of property which is contained in a multiple asset account, the provisions of § 1.167(a)-7(c) and § 1.167 (a)-11(c)(1)(iv) apply to prohibit depreciating a single account by two or more different methods.

(2) Jurisdiction of regulatory body. For purposes of this paragraph, a regulatory body is considered to have jurisdiction over property of a taxpayer if expenses with respect to the property are included in cost of service as determined by the regulatory body for ratemaking purposes or for reflecting operating results in its regulated books of account. For example, if regulatory body A, having jurisdiction over 60 percent of an item of X corporation's public utility property, required X to use the flow-through method of regulated accounting in circumstances which would bar X from using a method of depreciation under section 167(a) other than a subsection (l) method, and if regulatory body B, having jurisdiction over the remaining 40 percent of such item of property does not so require X to use the flow-through method of regulated accounting (or if the remaining 40 percent is not subject to the jurisdiction of any regulatory body), then with respect to 60 percent of the adjusted basis of the property X is prohibited from using a method of depreciation for purposes of section 167(a) other than a subsection (1) method. If in such example, A, having jurisdiction over 60 percent of X's public utility property, had jurisdiction over 100 percent of a particular generator, then with respect to the generator X would be prohibited from using a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method.

(3) Public utility property subject to more than one regulatory body. If a regulatory body having jurisdiction over public utility property with respect to the taxpayer's regulated books of account requires the taxpayer to reflect its tax expense in such books in the manner used by the regulatory body having jurisdiction over the public utility property for purposes of determining the taxpayer's cost of service for ratemaking purposes, the rules of subparagraphs (1) and (2) of this paragraph shall apply.

(b) Leasing transactions -

(1) Leased property. Public utility property as defined in paragraph (b) of § 1.167(l)-1 includes property which is leased by a taxpayer where the leasing of such property is part of the lessor's section 167(l) public utility activity. Thus, such leased property qualifies as public utility property even though the predominant use of such property by the lessee is in other than a section 167(l) public utility activity. Further, leased property qualifies as public utility property under section 167(l) even though the leasing is not part of the lessor's public utility activity if the predominant use of such property by the lessee or any sublessee is in a section 167(l) public utility activity. However, the limitations of section 167(l) apply to a taxpayer only if such taxpayer is subject to the jurisdiction of a regulatory body described in a section 167(l)(3)(A). For example, if a financial institution purchases property which it then leases to a lessee which uses such property predominantly in a section 167(l) public utility activity, the property qualifies as public utility property. However, because the financial institution's rates for leasing the property are not subject to the jurisdiction of a regulatory body described in section 167(l)(3)(A), the provisions of section 167(l) do not apply to the depreciation deductions taken with respect to the property by the financial institution. For possible application of section 167(l) to the lessee, see subparagraph (2) of this paragraph.

(2) Certain rental payments. Under section 167(l)(5), if a taxpayer leases property which is public utility property and the regulatory body having jurisdiction over such property for purposes of determining the taxpayer's operating results in its regulated books of account or for ratemaking purposes allows only an amount of such lessee's expenses with respect to the lease which is less than the amount which the taxpayer deducts for purposes of its Federal income tax liability, then a portion of the difference between such amounts shall not be allowed as a deduction by the taxpayer for purposes of its Federal income tax liability in such manner and time as the Commissioner or his delegate may determine consistent with the principles of § 1.167(l)-1 and this section applicable as to when a method of depreciation other than a subsection (1) method may be used for purposes of section 167(a).

(c) Certain partnership arrangements. Under section 167(l)(5), if property held by a partnership is not public utility property in the hands of the partnership but would be public utility property if an election was made under section 761 to be excluded from partnership treatment, then section 167(l) shall be applied by treating the partners as directly owning the property in proportion to their partnership interests.

(d) Cross reference. See § 1.167(l)-1(c)(1) for treatment of certain property as “pre-1970 public utility property” and § 1.167(l)-1(e)(4)(ii) for applicable 1968 method in the case of property acquired in certain transactions.

[T.D. 7315, 39 FR 20202, June 7, 1974]