26 CFR § 1.279-4 - Special rules.

§ 1.279-4 Special rules.

(a) Special 3-year rule. Under section 279(d)(4), if an obligation which has been deemed to be corporate acquisition indebtedness for any taxable year would not be such indebtedness for each of any 3 consecutive taxable years thereafter if the ratio of debt to equity and the ratio of projected earnings to annual interest to be paid or incurred of section 279 (b)(4) were applied as of the close of each of such 3 years, then such obligation shall not be corporate acquisition indebtedness for any taxable years after such 3 consecutive taxable years. The test prescribed by section 279(b)(4) shall be applied as of the close of any taxable year whether or not the issuing corporation issues any obligation to provide consideration for an acquisition described in section 279(b)(1) in such taxable year. Thus, for example, if a corporation, reporting income on a calendar year basis, has an obligation outstanding as of December 31, 1975, which was classified as a corporate acquisition indebtedness as of the close of 1972 and such obligation would not have been classified as corporate acquisition indebtedness as of the close of 1973, 1974, and 1975 because neither of the conditions of section 279(b)(4) were present as of such dates, then such obligation shall not be corporate acquisition indebtedness for 1976 and all taxable years thereafter. Such obligation shall not be reclassified as corporate acquisition indebtedness in any taxable year following 1975, even if the issuing corporation issues more obligations (whether or not found to be corporate acquisition indebtedness) in such later years to provide consideration for the acquisition of additional stock in, or assets of, the same acquired corporation with respect to which the original obligation was issued. The interest attributable to such obligation shall reduce the $5 million limitation provided by section 279(a)(1) for 1976 and all taxable years thereafter.

(b) Five percent stock rule -

(1) In general. Under section 279(d)(5), if an obligation issued to provide consideration for an acquisition of stock in another corporation meets the tests of section 279(b), such obligation shall be corporate acquisition indebtedness for a taxable year only if at sometime after October 9, 1969, and before the close of such year the issuing corporation owns or has owned 5 percent or more of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock entitled to vote in the acquired corporation. If the issuing corporation is a member of an affiliated group, then in accordance with section 279(g) the affiliated group shall be treated as the issuing corporation. Thus, any stock of the acquired corporation owned by members of the affiliated group shall be aggregated to determine if the percentage limitation provided by this subparagraph is exceeded. Once an obligation is deemed to be corporate acquisition indebtedness such obligation will continue to be deemed corporate acquisition indebtedness for all taxable years thereafter unless the provisions of section 279(d) (3) or (4) apply, notwithstanding the fact that the issuing corporation owns less than 5 percent of the combined voting power of all classes of stock entitled to vote of the acquired corporation in any or all taxable years thereafter.

(2) Examples. The provisions of this paragraph may be illustrated by the following examples:

Example 1.
Corporation Y uses the calendar year as its taxable year and has only one class of stock outstanding. On June 1, 1972, X Corporation which is also a calendar year taxpayer and which has never been a shareholder of Y Corporation acquires from the shareholders of Y Corporation 4 percent of the stock of Y Corporation in exchange for obligations which satisfy the conditions of section 279(b). At no time during 1972 does X Corporation own 5 percent or more of the stock of Y Corporation. Accordingly, under the provisions of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph, for 1972 the obligations issued by X Corporation to provide consideration for the acquisition of Y Corporation's stock do not constitute corporate acquisition indebtedness.
Example 2.
Assume the same facts as in Example 1. Assume further that on February 24, 1973, X Corporation acquires from the shareholders of Y Corporation an additional 7 percent of the stock of Y Corporation in exchange for obligations which satisfy all of the tests of section 279(b). On December 28, 1973, X Corporation sells all of its stock in Y Corporation. For 1973, the obligations issued by X Corporation in 1972 and in 1973 constitute corporate acquisition indebtedness since X Corporation at some time after October 9, 1969, and before the close of 1973 owned 5 percent or more of the voting stock of Y Corporation. Furthermore, such obligations shall be corporate acquisition indebtedness for all taxable years thereafter unless the special provisions of section 279(d) (3) or (4) could apply.

(c) Changes in obligation -

(1) In general. Under section 279(h), for purposes of section 279:

(i) Any extension, renewal, or refinancing of an obligation evidencing a preexisting indebtedness shall not be deemed to be the issuance of a new obligation, and

(ii) Any obligation which is corporate acquisition indebtedness of the issuing corporation is also corporate acquisition indebtedness of any corporation which in any transaction or by operation of law assumes liability for such obligation or becomes liable for such obligation as guarantor, endorser, or indemnitor.

(2) Examples. The provisions of this paragraph may be illustrated by the following examples:

Example 1.
On January 1, 1971, X Corporation, which files its return on the basis of a calendar year, issues an obligation, which satisfies the tests of section 279(b), and is deemed to be corporate acquisition indebtedness. On January 1, 1973, an agreement is concluded between X Corporation and the holder of the obligation whereby the maturity date of such obligation is extended until December 31, 1979. Under the provisions of subparagraph (1)(i) of this paragraph such extended obligation is not deemed to be a new obligation, and still constitutes corporate acquisition indebtedness.
Example 2.
On June 12, 1971, X Corporation, a calendar year taxpayer, issued convertible and subordinated obligations to acquire the stock of Z Corporation. The obligations were deemed corporate acquisition indebtedness on December 31, 1971. On March 4, 1973, X Corporation and Y Corporation consolidated to form XY Corporation in accordance with State law. Corporation XY is liable for the obligations issued by X Corporation by operation of law and the obligations continue to be corporate acquisition indebtedness. In 1975 XY Corporation exchanges its own nonconvertible obligations for the obligations X Corporation issued. The obligations of XY Corporation issued in exchange for those of X Corporation will be deemed to be corporate acquisition indebtedness.
[T.D. 7262, 38 FR 5847, Mar. 5, 1973; 38 FR 6893, Mar. 14, 1973]