40 CFR § 273.33 - Waste management.

§ 273.33 Waste management.

(a) Universal waste batteries. A large quantity handler of universal waste must manage universal waste batteries in a way that prevents releases of any universal waste or component of a universal waste to the environment, as follows:

(1) A large quantity handler of universal waste must contain any universal waste battery that shows evidence of leakage, spillage, or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions in a container. The container must be closed, structurally sound, compatible with the contents of the battery, and must lack evidence of leakage, spillage, or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions.

(2) A large quantity handler of universal waste may conduct the following activities as long as the casing of each individual battery cell is not breached and remains intact and closed (except that cells may be opened to remove electrolyte but must be immediately closed after removal):

(i) Sorting batteries by type;

(ii) Mixing battery types in one container;

(iii) Discharging batteries so as to remove the electric charge;

(iv) Regenerating used batteries;

(v) Disassembling batteries or battery packs into individual batteries or cells;

(vi) Removing batteries from consumer products; or

(vii) Removing electrolyte from batteries.

(3) A large quantity handler of universal waste who removes electrolyte from batteries, or who generates other solid waste (e.g., battery pack materials, discarded consumer products) as a result of the activities listed above, must determine whether the electrolyte and/or other solid waste exhibit a characteristic of hazardous waste identified in 40 CFR part 261, subpart C.

(i) If the electrolyte and/or other solid waste exhibit a characteristic of hazardous waste, it must be managed in compliance with all applicable requirements of 40 CFR parts 260 through 272. The handler is considered the generator of the hazardous electrolyte and/or other waste and is subject to 40 CFR part 262.

(ii) If the electrolyte or other solid waste is not hazardous, the handler may manage the waste in any way that is in compliance with applicable federal, state or local solid waste regulations.

(b) Universal waste pesticides. A large quantity handler of universal waste must manage universal waste pesticides in a way that prevents releases of any universal waste or component of a universal waste to the environment. The universal waste pesticides must be contained in one or more of the following:

(1) A container that remains closed, structurally sound, compatible with the pesticide, and that lacks evidence of leakage, spillage, or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions; or

(2) A container that does not meet the requirements of paragraph (b)(1) of this section, provided that the unacceptable container is overpacked in a container that does meet the requirements of paragraph (b)(1) of this section; or

(3) A tank that meets the requirements of 40 CFR part 265 subpart J, except for 40 CFR 265.197(c), 265.200, and 265.201; or

(4) A transport vehicle or vessel that is closed, structurally sound, compatible with the pesticide, and that lacks evidence of leakage, spillage, or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions.

(c) Mercury-containing equipment. A large quantity handler of universal waste must manage universal waste mercury-containing equipment in a way that prevents releases of any universal waste or component of a universal waste to the environment, as follows:

(1) A large quantity handler of universal waste must place in a container any universal waste mercury-containing equipment with non-contained elemental mercury or that shows evidence of leakage, spillage, or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions. The container must be closed, structurally sound, compatible with the contents of the device, must lack evidence of leakage, spillage, or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions, and must be reasonably designed to prevent the escape of mercury into the environment by volatilization or any other means.

(2) A large quantity handler of universal waste may remove mercury-containing ampules from universal waste mercury-containing equipment provided the handler:

(i) Removes and manages the ampules in a manner designed to prevent breakage of the ampules;

(ii) Removes the ampules only over or in a containment device (e.g., tray or pan sufficient to collect and contain any mercury released from an ampule in case of breakage);

(iii) Ensures that a mercury clean-up system is readily available to immediately transfer any mercury resulting from spills or leaks of broken ampules from that containment device to a container that meets the requirements of 40 CFR 262.34;

(iv) Immediately transfers any mercury resulting from spills or leaks from broken ampules from the containment device to a container that meets the requirements of 40 CFR 262.34;

(v) Ensures that the area in which ampules are removed is well ventilated and monitored to ensure compliance with applicable OSHA exposure levels for mercury;

(vi) Ensures that employees removing ampules are thoroughly familiar with proper waste mercury handling and emergency procedures, including transfer of mercury from containment devices to appropriate containers;

(vii) Stores removed ampules in closed, non-leaking containers that are in good condition;

(viii) Packs removed ampules in the container with packing materials adequate to prevent breakage during storage, handling, and transportation;

(3) A large quantity handler of universal waste mercury-containing equipment that does not contain an ampule may remove the open original housing holding the mercury from universal waste mercury-containing equipment provided the handler:

(i) Immediately seals the original housing holding the mercury with an air-tight seal to prevent the release of any mercury to the environment; and

(ii) Follows all requirements for removing ampules and managing removed ampules under paragraph (c)(2) of this section; and

(4) (i) A large quantity handler of universal waste who removes mercury-containing ampules from mercury-containing equipment or seals mercury from mercury-containing equipment in its original housing must determine whether the following exhibit a characteristic of hazardous waste identified in 40 CFR part 261, subpart C:

(A) Mercury or clean-up residues resulting from spills or leaks and/or

(B) Other solid waste generated as a result of the removal of mercury-containing ampules or housings (e.g., the remaining mercury-containing device).

(ii) If the mercury, residues, and/or other solid waste exhibits a characteristic of hazardous waste, it must be managed in compliance with all applicable requirements of 40 CFR parts 260 through 272. The handler is considered the generator of the mercury, residues, and/or other waste and must manage it in compliance with 40 CFR part 262.

(iii) If the mercury, residues, and/or other solid waste is not hazardous, the handler may manage the waste in any way that is in compliance with applicable federal, state or local solid waste regulations.

(d) Lamps. A large quantity handler of universal waste must manage lamps in a way that prevents releases of any universal waste or component of a universal waste to the environment, as follows:

(1) A large quantity handler of universal waste must contain any lamp in containers or packages that are structurally sound, adequate to prevent breakage, and compatible with the contents of the lamps. Such containers and packages must remain closed and must lack evidence of leakage, spillage or damage that could cause leakage under reasonably foreseeable conditions.

(2) A large quantity handler of universal waste must immediately clean up and place in a container any lamp that is broken and must place in a container any lamp that shows evidence of breakage, leakage, or damage that could cause the release of mercury or other hazardous constituents to the environment. Containers must be closed, structurally sound, compatible with the contents of the lamps and must lack evidence of leakage, spillage or damage that could cause leakage or releases of mercury or other hazardous constituents to the environment under reasonably foreseeable conditions.

[60 FR 25542, May 11, 1995, as amended at 64 FR 36489, July 6, 1999; 70 FR 45522, Aug. 5, 2005]