40 CFR § 761.2 - PCB concentration assumptions for use.

§ 761.2 PCB concentration assumptions for use.

(a)

(1) Any person may assume that transformers with <3 pounds (1.36 kilograms (kgs)) of fluid, circuit breakers, reclosers, oil-filled cable, and rectifiers whose PCB concentration is not established contain PCBs at <50 ppm.

(2) Any person must assume that mineral oil-filled electrical equipment that was manufactured before July 2, 1979, and whose PCB concentration is not established is PCB-Contaminated Electrical Equipment (i.e., contains ≥50 ppm PCB, but <500 ppm PCB). All pole-top and pad-mounted distribution transformers manufactured before July 2, 1979, must be assumed to be mineral-oil filled. Any person may assume that electrical equipment manufactured after July 2, 1979, is non-PCB (i.e., <50 ppm PCBs). If the date of manufacture of mineral oil-filled electrical equipment is unknown, any person must assume it to be PCB-Contaminated.

(3) Any person must assume that a transformer manufactured prior to July 2, 1979, that contains 1.36 kg (3 pounds) or more of fluid other than mineral oil and whose PCB concentration is not established, is a PCB Transformer (i.e., ≥500 ppm). If the date of manufacture and the type of dielectric fluid are unknown, any person must assume the transformer to be a PCB Transformer.

(4) Any person must assume that a capacitor manufactured prior to July 2, 1979, whose PCB concentration is not established contains ≥500 ppm PCBs. Any person may assume that a capacitor manufactured after July 2, 1979, is non-PCB (i.e., <50 ppm PCBs). If the date of manufacture is unknown, any person must assume the capacitor contains ≥500 ppm PCBs. Any person may assume that a capacitor marked at the time of manufacture with the statement “No PCBs” in accordance with § 761.40(g) is non-PCB.

(b) PCB concentration may be established by:

(1) Testing the equipment; or

(2)

(i) A permanent label, mark, or other documentation from the manufacturer of the equipment indicating its PCB concentration at the time of manufacture; and

(ii) Service records or other documentation indicating the PCB concentration of all fluids used in servicing the equipment since it was first manufactured.

[63 FR 35436, June 29, 1998, as amended at 64 FR 33759, June 24, 1999]

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