Incorporation by reference.

Incorporation by reference. The following additional requirements apply based on industry standard specifications, which are incorporated by reference in 86.1:
(1) The following requirements apply for standardized on-board to off-board communications:
(1) The following requirements apply for standardized on-board to off-board communications:
(i) Starting in model year 2008, light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks must comply with ISO 15765-4:2005(E), “Road Vehicles-Diagnostics on Controller Area Network (CAN) - Part 4: Requirements for emission-related systems”, January 15, 2005.
(ii) Starting in model year 2008, heavy-duty vehicles must comply with the protocol described in paragraph (h)(1)(i) of this section, or the following set of SAE standards: SAE J1939-11, Revised October 1999; SAE J1939-13, July 1999; SAE J1939-21, Revised April 2001; SAE J1939-31, Revised December 1997; SAE J1939-71, Revised January 2008; SAE J1939-73, Revised September 2006; SAE J1939-81, May 2003.
(iii) Note that for model years 1996 through 2007 manufacturers could instead comply with the protocols specified in SAE J1850, ISO 9141-2, or ISO 14230-4.
(2) Light-duty vehicles and light-duty trucks must meet the following additional specifications:
(i) Basic diagnostic data (as specified in §§ 86.094-17(e) and (f)) shall be provided in the format and units in SAE J1979 “E/E Diagnostic Test Modes - Equivalent to ISO/DIS 15031-5: Revised, May 2007.
(ii) Diagnostic trouble codes shall be consistent with SAE J2012 “Diagnostic Trouble Code Definitions - Equivalent to ISO/DIS 15031-6: April 30, 2002”, (Revised, April 2002).
(iii) The connection interface between the OBD system and test equipment and diagnostic tools shall meet the functional requirements of SAE J1962 “Diagnostic Connector - Equivalent to ISO/DIS 15031-3: December 14, 2001” (Revised, April 2002).
(iv) SAE J1930, Revised April 2002. All acronyms, definitions and abbreviations shall be formatted according to this industry standard. Alternatively, manufacturers may use SAE J2403, Revised August 2007.
(v) All equipment used to interface, extract, and display OBD-related information shall meet SAE J1978 “OBD II Scan Tool” Equivalent to ISO 15031-4: December 14, 2001”, (Revised, April 2002).
(i) Deficiencies and alternative fueled vehicles. Upon application by the manufacturer, the Administrator may accept an OBD system as compliant even though specific requirements are not fully met. Such compliances without meeting specific requirements, or deficiencies, will be granted only if compliance would be infeasible or unreasonable considering such factors as, but not limited to: Technical feasibility of the given monitor and lead time and production cycles including phase-in or phase-out of vehicle designs and programmed upgrades of computers. Unmet requirements should not be carried over from the previous model year except where unreasonable hardware or software modifications would be necessary to correct the deficiency, and the manufacturer has demonstrated an acceptable level of effort toward compliance as determined by the Administrator. Furthermore, EPA will not accept any deficiency requests that include the complete lack of a major diagnostic monitor (“major” diagnostic monitors being those for exhaust aftertreatment devices, oxygen sensor, air-fuel ratio sensor, NOX sensor, engine misfire, evaporative leaks, and diesel EGR, if equipped), with the possible exception of the special provisions for alternative fueled engines. For alternative fueled vehicles (e.g., natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, ethanol), manufacturers may request the Administrator to waive specific monitoring requirements of this section for which monitoring may not be reliable with respect to the use of the alternative fuel. At a minimum, alternative fuel engines must be equipped with an OBD system meeting OBD requirements to the extent feasible as approved by the Administrator.
(j) California OBDII compliance option. Manufacturers may comply with California's OBD requirements instead of meeting the requirements of this section as follows:
(1) Through the 2006 model year, demonstration of compliance with California OBDII requirements (Title 13 California Code of Regulations § 1968.2 (13 CCR 1968.2)), as modified, approved and filed on April 21, 2003 (incorporated by reference, see § 86.1), shall satisfy the requirements of this section, except that compliance with 13 CCR 1968.2(e)(4.2.2)(C), pertaining to 0.02 inch evaporative leak detection, and 13 CCR 1968.2(d)(1.4), pertaining to tampering protection, are not required to satisfy the requirements of this section. Also, the deficiency provisions of 13 CCR 1968.2(i) do not apply. In addition, demonstration of compliance with 13 CCR 1968.2(e)(16.2.1)(C), to the extent it applies to the verification of proper alignment between the camshaft and crankshaft, applies only to vehicles equipped with variable valve timing.
(2) For 2007 through 2012 model year vehicles, demonstration of compliance with California OBD II requirements (Title 13 California Code of Regulations § 1968.2 (13 CCR 1968.2)), approved on November 9, 2007 (incorporated by reference, see § 86.1), shall satisfy the requirements of this section, except that compliance with 13 CCR 1968.2(e)(4.2.2)(C), pertaining to 0.02 inch evaporative leak detection, and 13 CCR 1968.2(d)(1.4), pertaining to tampering protection, are not required to satisfy the requirements of this section. Also, the deficiency provisions of 13 CCR 1968.2(k) do not apply. In addition, demonstration of compliance with 13 CCR 1968.2(e)(15.2.1)(C), to the extent it applies to the verification of proper alignment between the camshaft and crankshaft, applies only to vehicles equipped with variable valve timing.
(3) Beginning with the 2013 model year, manufacturers may demonstrate compliance with California's 2013 OBD requirements as described in § 86.1806-17(a).
(4) For all model years, the deficiency provisions of paragraph (i) of this section and the evaporative leak detection requirement of paragraph (b)(4) of this section, if applicable, apply to manufacturers selecting this paragraph for demonstrating compliance.
(k) Certification. For test groups required to have an OBD system, certification will not be granted if, for any test vehicle approved by the Administrator in consultation with the manufacturer, the malfunction indicator light does not illuminate under any of the following circumstances, unless the manufacturer can demonstrate that any identified OBD problems discovered during the Administrator's evaluation will be corrected on production vehicles.
(1)
(i) Otto-cycle. A catalyst is replaced with a deteriorated or defective catalyst, or an electronic simulation of such, resulting in an increase of 1.5 times the NMHC standard or FEL above the NMHC emission level measured using a representative 4000 mile catalyst system.
(ii) Diesel.
(A) If monitored for emissions performance - a catalyst is replaced with a deteriorated or defective catalyst, or an electronic simulation of such, resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable standard or FEL for NOX or PM.
(B) If monitored for performance - a particulate trap is replaced with a trap that has catastrophically failed, or an electronic simulation of such.
(2)
(i) Otto-cycle. An engine misfire condition is induced resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable standards or FEL for NMHC, CO or NOX.
(ii) Diesel. An engine misfire condition is induced and is not detected.
(3) If so equipped, any oxygen sensor is replaced with a deteriorated or defective oxygen sensor, or an electronic simulation of such, resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable standard or FEL for NMHC, CO or NOX.
(4) If so equipped, a vapor leak is introduced in the evaporative and/or refueling system (excluding the tubing and connections between the purge valve and the intake manifold) greater than or equal in magnitude to a leak caused by a 0.040 inch diameter orifice, or the evaporative purge air flow is blocked or otherwise eliminated from the complete evaporative emission control system.
(5) A malfunction condition is induced in any emission-related powertrain system or component, including but not necessarily limited to, the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system, if equipped, the secondary air system, if equipped, and the fuel control system, singularly resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable emission standard or FEL for NMHC, CO, NOX or PM.
(6) A malfunction condition is induced in an electronic emission-related powertrain system or component not otherwise described in this paragraph (k) that either provides input to or receives commands from the on-board computer resulting in a measurable impact on emissions.
(7) For clean alternative fuel conversion manufacturers (e.g., natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, ethanol), in lieu of the requirements specified for other manufacturers in this paragraph (k), you may demonstrate that the malfunction indicator light will illuminate, at a minimum, under any of the following circumstances when the vehicle is operated on the applicable alternative fuel:
(i) Otto-cycle. A catalyst is replaced with a defective catalyst system where the catalyst brick for the monitored volume has been removed (i.e., empty catalyst system) resulting in an increase of 1.5 times the NMOG (or NMOG + NOX) standard or FEL above the NMOG (or NMOG + NOX) emission level measured using a representative 4000 mile catalyst system.
(ii) Diesel.
(A) If monitored for emissions performance - a catalyst is replaced with a defective catalyst system where the catalyst brick for the monitored volume has been removed (i.e., empty catalyst can) resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable standard or FEL for NOX (or NMOG + NOX) or PM.
(B) If monitored for performance - a particulate trap is replaced with a trap that has catastrophically failed.
(iii) Misfire.
(A) Otto-cycle. An engine misfire condition is induced that completely disables one or more cylinders, either through mechanical or electrical means, resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable standards or FEL for CO, NMOG, or NOX (or NMOG + NOX).
(B) Diesel. An engine misfire condition resulting in complete lack of cylinder firing is induced and is not detected.
(iv) If so equipped, any oxygen sensor is replaced with a completely defective oxygen sensor, or an electronic simulation of such, resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable standard or FEL for CO, NMOG, or NOX (or NMOG + NOX).
(v) If so equipped and applicable, a vapor leak is introduced in the evaporative and/or refueling system (excluding the tubing and connections between the purge valve and the intake manifold) greater than or equal in magnitude to a leak caused by a 0.040 inch diameter orifice, or the evaporative purge air flow is blocked or otherwise eliminated from the complete evaporative emission control system. At a minimum, gas cap removal or complete venting of the evaporative and/or refueling system may be introduced resulting in a gross leak of the complete evaporative emission control system.
(vi) A malfunction condition is induced resulting in complete disablement in any emission-related powertrain system or component, including but not necessarily limited to, the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system, if equipped, the secondary air system, if equipped, and the fuel control system, singularly resulting in exhaust emissions exceeding 1.5 times the applicable emission standard or FEL for PM, CO, NMOG, or NOX (or NMOG + NOX).
(vii) A malfunction condition is induced that completely disables an electronic emission-related powertrain system or component not otherwise described in this paragraph (k) that either provides input to or receives commands from the onboard computer resulting in a measurable impact on emissions. At a minimum, manufacturers may be required to perform this disablement on critical inputs and outputs where lack of the input and output disables an entire monitor as described in this paragraph (k)(7)(vii), disables multiple monitors (e.g., two or more) used by the onboard computer, or renders the entire onboard computer and its functions inoperative.
(viii) Clean alternative fuel conversion manufacturers must use good engineering judgment to induce malfunctions and may perform more stringent malfunction demonstrations than described in this paragraph (k)(7). In addition, the Administrator reserves the right to request a clean alternative fuel conversion manufacturer to perform stricter demonstration requirements, to the extent feasible, on clean alternative fuel conversions.
(l) Phase-in for complete heavy-duty vehicles. Complete heavy-duty vehicles weighing 14,000 pounds GVWR or less that are not Otto-cycle MDPVs must meet the OBD requirements of this section according to the following phase-in schedule, based on the percentage of projected vehicle sales. The 2004 model year requirements in the following phase-in schedule are applicable only to heavy-duty Otto-cycle vehicles where the manufacturer has selected Otto-cycle Option 1 or 2 for alternative 2003 or 2004 compliance according to § 86.004-01(c)(1) or (2). The 2005 through 2007 requirements in the following phase-in schedule apply to all heavy-duty vehicles weighing 14,000 pounds GVWR or less, excluding MDPVs. If the manufacturer has selected Otto-cycle Option 3 it may exempt 2005 model year complete heavy-duty engines and vehicles whose model year commences before July 31, 2004 from the requirements of this section. For the purposes of calculating compliance with the phase-in provisions of this paragraph (l), heavy-duty vehicles subject to the phase-in requirements of this section may be combined with heavy-duty vehicles subject to the phase-in requirements of paragraph § 86.005-17 (k). The phase-in schedule follows:

Source

40 CFR § 86.1806-05


Scoping language

General.
(1) Except as provided by paragraph (a)(2) of this section, all light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and complete heavy-duty vehicles weighing 14,000 pounds GVWR or less (including MDPVs) must be equipped with an onboard diagnostic (OBD) system capable of monitoring all emission-related powertrain systems or components during the applicable useful life of the vehicle. All systems and components required to be monitored by these regulations must be evaluated periodically, but no less frequently than once per applicable certification test cycle as defined in paragraphs (a) and (d) of Appendix I of this part, or similar trip as approved by the Administrator. Emissions of CO2, CH4, and N2O are not required to be monitored by the OBD system.
(2) Diesel fueled MDPVs and heavy-duty vehicles weighing 14,000 pounds GVWR or less that are not MDPVs must meet the OBD requirements of this section according to the phase-in schedule in paragraph (l) of this section. Paragraph (l) of this section does not apply to Otto-cycle MDPVs.
(3) An OBD system demonstrated to fully meet the requirements in, through model year 2006, § 86.004-17 and, for model years 2007 and later, § 86.007-17 may be used to meet the requirements of this section, provided that such an OBD system also incorporates appropriate transmission diagnostics as may be required under this section, and provided that the Administrator finds that a manufacturer's decision to use the flexibility in this paragraph (a)(3) is based on good engineering judgement.

Is this correct? or