Constant flow rate.

Constant flow rate. If you continuously sample from a constant exhaust flow rate, use the same emission calculations described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section or calculate the mean or flow-weighted concentration recorded over the test interval and treat the mean as a batch sample, as described in paragraph (c)(3)(ii) of this section. We consider the following to be examples of constant exhaust flows: CVS diluted exhaust with a CVS flowmeter that has either an upstream heat exchanger, electronic flow control, or both.
(3) Batch sampling. For batch sampling, the concentration is a single value from a proportionally extracted batch sample (such as a bag, filter, impinger, or cartridge). In this case, multiply the mean concentration of the batch sample by the total flow from which the sample was extracted. You may calculate total flow by integrating a varying flow rate or by determining the mean of a constant flow rate, as follows:
(i) Varying flow rate. If you collect a batch sample from a varying exhaust flow rate, extract a sample proportional to the varying exhaust flow rate. We consider the following to be examples of varying flows that require proportional sampling: raw exhaust, exhaust diluted with a constant flow rate of dilution air, and CVS dilution with a CVS flow meter that does not have an upstream heat exchanger or electronic flow control. Integrate the flow rate over a test interval to determine the total flow from which you extracted the proportional sample. Multiply the mean concentration of the batch sample by the total flow from which the sample was extracted to determine the total emission. If the total emission is a molar quantity, convert this quantity to a mass by multiplying it by its molar mass, M. The result is the total emission mass, m. In the case of PM emissions, where the mean PM concentration is already in units of mass per mole of exhaust, simply multiply it by the total flow. The result is the total mass of PM, mPM. Calculate m for each constituent as follows:
(A) Calculate m for measuring gaseous emission constituents with sampling that results in a molar concentration, x , using the following equation:
(3) Batch sampling. For batch sampling, the concentration is a single value from a proportionally extracted batch sample (such as a bag, filter, impinger, or cartridge). In this case, multiply the mean concentration of the batch sample by the total flow from which the sample was extracted. You may calculate total flow by integrating a varying flow rate or by determining the mean of a constant flow rate, as follows:
(i) Varying flow rate. If you collect a batch sample from a varying exhaust flow rate, extract a sample proportional to the varying exhaust flow rate. We consider the following to be examples of varying flows that require proportional sampling: raw exhaust, exhaust diluted with a constant flow rate of dilution air, and CVS dilution with a CVS flow meter that does not have an upstream heat exchanger or electronic flow control. Integrate the flow rate over a test interval to determine the total flow from which you extracted the proportional sample. Multiply the mean concentration of the batch sample by the total flow from which the sample was extracted to determine the total emission. If the total emission is a molar quantity, convert this quantity to a mass by multiplying it by its molar mass, M. The result is the total emission mass, m. In the case of PM emissions, where the mean PM concentration is already in units of mass per mole of exhaust, simply multiply it by the total flow. The result is the total mass of PM, mPM. Calculate m for each constituent as follows:
(A) Calculate m for measuring gaseous emission constituents with sampling that results in a molar concentration, x , using the following equation:

Source

40 CFR § 1065.650


Scoping language

None
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