Special rules for ADSP

Special rules for ADSP -
(1) Increases or decreases in deemed sale tax consequences taxable notwithstanding old target ceases to exist. To the extent general principles of tax law would require a seller in an actual asset sale to account for events relating to the sale that occur after the sale date, target must make such an accounting. Target is not precluded from realizing additional deemed sale tax consequences because the target is treated as a new corporation after the acquisition date.
(2) Procedure for transactions in which section 338(h)(10) is not elected -
(i) Deemed sale tax consequences included in new target's return. If an election under section 338(h)(10) is not made, any additional deemed sale tax consequences of old target resulting from an increase or decrease in the ADSP are included in new target's income tax return for new target's taxable year in which the increase or decrease is taken into account. For example, if after the acquisition date there is an increase in the allocable ADSP of section 1245 property for which the recomputed basis (but not the adjusted basis) exceeds the portion of the ADSP allocable to that particular asset on the acquisition date, the additional gain is treated as ordinary income to the extent it does not exceed such excess amount. See paragraph (c)(2)(ii) of this section for the special treatment of old target's carryovers and carrybacks. Although included in new target's income tax return, the deemed sale tax consequences are separately accounted for as an item of old target and may not be offset by income, gain, deduction, loss, credit, or other amount of new target. The amount of tax on income of old target resulting from an increase or decrease in the ADSP is determined as if such deemed sale tax consequences had been recognized in old target's taxable year ending at the close of the acquisition date. However, because the income resulting from the increase or decrease in ADSP is reportable in new target's taxable year of the increase or decrease, not in old target's taxable year ending at the close of the acquisition date, there is not a resulting underpayment of tax in that past taxable year of old target for purposes of calculation of interest due.
(ii) Carryovers and carrybacks -
(A) Loss carryovers to new target taxable years. A net operating loss or net capital loss of old target may be carried forward to a taxable year of new target, under the principles of section 172 or 1212, as applicable, but is allowed as a deduction only to the extent of any recognized income of old target for such taxable year, as described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section. For this purpose, however, taxable years of new target are not taken into account in applying the limitations in section 172(b)(1) or 1212(a)(1)(B) (or other similar limitations). In applying sections 172(b) and 1212(a)(1), only income, gain, loss, deduction, credit, and other amounts of old target are taken into account. Thus, if old target has an unexpired net operating loss at the close of its taxable year in which the deemed asset sale occurred that could be carried forward to a subsequent taxable year, such loss may be carried forward until it is absorbed by old target's income.
(B) Loss carrybacks to taxable years of old target. An ordinary loss or capital loss accounted for as a separate item of old target under paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section may be carried back to a taxable year of old target under the principles of section 172 or 1212, as applicable. For this purpose, taxable years of new target are not taken into account in applying the limitations in section 172(b) or 1212(a) (or other similar limitations).
(C) Credit carryovers and carrybacks. The principles described in paragraphs (c)(2)(ii)(A) and (B) of this section apply to carryovers and carrybacks of amounts for purposes of determining the amount of a credit allowable under part IV, subchapter A, chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code. Thus, for example, credit carryovers of old target may offset only income tax attributable to items described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section.
(3) Procedure for transactions in which section 338(h)(10) is elected. If an election under section 338(h)(10) is made, any changes in the deemed sale tax consequences caused by an increase or decrease in the ADSP are accounted for in determining the taxable income (or other amount) of the member of the selling consolidated group, the selling affiliate, or the S corporation shareholders to which such income, loss, or other amount is attributable for the taxable year in which such increase or decrease is taken into account.
(d) Special rules for AGUB -
(1) Effect of disposition or depreciation of acquisition date assets. If an acquisition date asset has been disposed of, depreciated, amortized, or depleted by new target before an amount is added to the original allocation to the asset, the increased amount otherwise allocable to such asset is taken into account under general principles of tax law that apply when part of the cost of an asset not previously taken into account in basis is paid or incurred after the asset has been disposed of, depreciated, amortized, or depleted. A similar rule applies when an amount is subtracted from the original allocation to the asset. For purposes of the preceding sentence, an asset is considered to have been disposed of to the extent that its allocable portion of the decrease in AGUB would reduce its basis below zero.
(2) Section 38 property. Section 1.47-2(c) applies to a reduction in basis of section 38 property under this section.
(e) Examples. The following examples illustrate this section. Any amount described in the following examples is exclusive of interest. For rules characterizing deferred contingent payments as principal or interest, see §§ 1.483-4, 1.1274-2(g), and 1.1275-4(c). The examples are as follows:
(ii)
(A) On September 1, 2000, P purchases all of the outstanding stock of T for $270 and makes a section 338 election for T. The grossed-up basis of the T stock and T's AGUB are both $270. The AGUB is ratably allocated among T's Class V assets in proportion to their fair market values as follows:
(iii) On January 1, 2001, new T sells the X stock and uses the proceeds to purchase inventory.
(iv) Pursuant to events on June 30, 2002, the contingent liability of old T is at that time properly taken into account under general principles of tax law. The amount of the liability is $60.
(v) T's AGUB increases by $60 from $270 to $330. This $60 increase in AGUB is first allocated among T's acquisition date assets in accordance with the provisions of § 1.338-6. Because the redetermined AGUB for T ($330) exceeds the sum of the fair market values at the beginning of the day after the acquisition date of the Class V acquisition date assets ($300), AGUB allocated to those assets is limited to those fair market values under § 1.338-6(c)(1). As there are no Class VI assets, the remaining AGUB of $30 is allocated to goodwill and going concern value (Class VII assets). The amount of increase in AGUB allocated to each acquisition date asset is determined as follows:
(iii) On January 1, 2007, the former shareholders refund $140 of the purchase price to P in a settlement of the lawsuit. Assume that, under general principles of tax law, both the seller and the buyer properly take into account such refund when paid. Assume also that the refund has no effect on the tax liability for the deemed sale tax consequences. This refund results in a decrease of T's ADSP and AGUB of $140, from $500 to $360.
(iv) The redetermined ADSP and AGUB of $360 is allocated among T's acquisition date assets. Because ADSP and AGUB do not exceed the fair market value of the Class V assets, the ADSP and AGUB amounts are allocated to the Class V assets in proportion to their fair market values at the beginning of the day after the acquisition date. Thus, $135 ($150 × ($360/($150 + $250))) is allocated to the machinery and $225 ($250 × ($360/($150 + $250))) is allocated to the land. Accordingly, the basis of the machinery is reduced by $15 ($150 original allocation - $135 redetermined allocation) and the basis of the land is reduced by $25 ($250 original allocation - $225 redetermined allocation). No amount is allocated to the Class VII assets. Accordingly, the basis of the goodwill and going concern value is reduced by $100 ($100 original allocation - $0 redetermined allocation).
(v) Assume that, as a result of deductions under section 168, the adjusted basis of the machinery immediately before the decrease in AGUB is zero. The machinery is treated as if it were disposed of before the decrease is taken into account. In 2007, T recognizes income of $15, the character of which is determined under the principles of Arrowsmith v. Commissioner and the tax benefit rule. No adjustment to the basis of T's assets is made for any tax paid on this amount. Assume also that, as a result of amortization deductions, the adjusted basis of the goodwill and going concern value immediately before the decrease in AGUB is $40. A similar adjustment to income is made in 2007 with respect to the $60 of previously amortized goodwill and going concern value.
(vi) In summary, the basis of T's acquisition date assets, as of January 1, 2007, is as follows:
(1) Increases or decreases in deemed sale tax consequences taxable notwithstanding old target ceases to exist. To the extent general principles of tax law would require a seller in an actual asset sale to account for events relating to the sale that occur after the sale date, target must make such an accounting. Target is not precluded from realizing additional deemed sale tax consequences because the target is treated as a new corporation after the acquisition date.
(2) Procedure for transactions in which section 338(h)(10) is not elected -
(i) Deemed sale tax consequences included in new target's return. If an election under section 338(h)(10) is not made, any additional deemed sale tax consequences of old target resulting from an increase or decrease in the ADSP are included in new target's income tax return for new target's taxable year in which the increase or decrease is taken into account. For example, if after the acquisition date there is an increase in the allocable ADSP of section 1245 property for which the recomputed basis (but not the adjusted basis) exceeds the portion of the ADSP allocable to that particular asset on the acquisition date, the additional gain is treated as ordinary income to the extent it does not exceed such excess amount. See paragraph (c)(2)(ii) of this section for the special treatment of old target's carryovers and carrybacks. Although included in new target's income tax return, the deemed sale tax consequences are separately accounted for as an item of old target and may not be offset by income, gain, deduction, loss, credit, or other amount of new target. The amount of tax on income of old target resulting from an increase or decrease in the ADSP is determined as if such deemed sale tax consequences had been recognized in old target's taxable year ending at the close of the acquisition date. However, because the income resulting from the increase or decrease in ADSP is reportable in new target's taxable year of the increase or decrease, not in old target's taxable year ending at the close of the acquisition date, there is not a resulting underpayment of tax in that past taxable year of old target for purposes of calculation of interest due.
(ii) Carryovers and carrybacks -
(A) Loss carryovers to new target taxable years. A net operating loss or net capital loss of old target may be carried forward to a taxable year of new target, under the principles of section 172 or 1212, as applicable, but is allowed as a deduction only to the extent of any recognized income of old target for such taxable year, as described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section. For this purpose, however, taxable years of new target are not taken into account in applying the limitations in section 172(b)(1) or 1212(a)(1)(B) (or other similar limitations). In applying sections 172(b) and 1212(a)(1), only income, gain, loss, deduction, credit, and other amounts of old target are taken into account. Thus, if old target has an unexpired net operating loss at the close of its taxable year in which the deemed asset sale occurred that could be carried forward to a subsequent taxable year, such loss may be carried forward until it is absorbed by old target's income.
(B) Loss carrybacks to taxable years of old target. An ordinary loss or capital loss accounted for as a separate item of old target under paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section may be carried back to a taxable year of old target under the principles of section 172 or 1212, as applicable. For this purpose, taxable years of new target are not taken into account in applying the limitations in section 172(b) or 1212(a) (or other similar limitations).
(C) Credit carryovers and carrybacks. The principles described in paragraphs (c)(2)(ii)(A) and (B) of this section apply to carryovers and carrybacks of amounts for purposes of determining the amount of a credit allowable under part IV, subchapter A, chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code. Thus, for example, credit carryovers of old target may offset only income tax attributable to items described in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section.
(3) Procedure for transactions in which section 338(h)(10) is elected. If an election under section 338(h)(10) is made, any changes in the deemed sale tax consequences caused by an increase or decrease in the ADSP are accounted for in determining the taxable income (or other amount) of the member of the selling consolidated group, the selling affiliate, or the S corporation shareholders to which such income, loss, or other amount is attributable for the taxable year in which such increase or decrease is taken into account.
(d) Special rules for AGUB -
(1) Effect of disposition or depreciation of acquisition date assets. If an acquisition date asset has been disposed of, depreciated, amortized, or depleted by new target before an amount is added to the original allocation to the asset, the increased amount otherwise allocable to such asset is taken into account under general principles of tax law that apply when part of the cost of an asset not previously taken into account in basis is paid or incurred after the asset has been disposed of, depreciated, amortized, or depleted. A similar rule applies when an amount is subtracted from the original allocation to the asset. For purposes of the preceding sentence, an asset is considered to have been disposed of to the extent that its allocable portion of the decrease in AGUB would reduce its basis below zero.
(2) Section 38 property. Section 1.47-2(c) applies to a reduction in basis of section 38 property under this section.
(e) Examples. The following examples illustrate this section. Any amount described in the following examples is exclusive of interest. For rules characterizing deferred contingent payments as principal or interest, see §§ 1.483-4, 1.1274-2(g), and 1.1275-4(c). The examples are as follows:
(ii)
(A) On September 1, 2000, P purchases all of the outstanding stock of T for $270 and makes a section 338 election for T. The grossed-up basis of the T stock and T's AGUB are both $270. The AGUB is ratably allocated among T's Class V assets in proportion to their fair market values as follows:
(iii) On January 1, 2001, new T sells the X stock and uses the proceeds to purchase inventory.
(iv) Pursuant to events on June 30, 2002, the contingent liability of old T is at that time properly taken into account under general principles of tax law. The amount of the liability is $60.
(v) T's AGUB increases by $60 from $270 to $330. This $60 increase in AGUB is first allocated among T's acquisition date assets in accordance with the provisions of § 1.338-6. Because the redetermined AGUB for T ($330) exceeds the sum of the fair market values at the beginning of the day after the acquisition date of the Class V acquisition date assets ($300), AGUB allocated to those assets is limited to those fair market values under § 1.338-6(c)(1). As there are no Class VI assets, the remaining AGUB of $30 is allocated to goodwill and going concern value (Class VII assets). The amount of increase in AGUB allocated to each acquisition date asset is determined as follows:
(iii) On January 1, 2007, the former shareholders refund $140 of the purchase price to P in a settlement of the lawsuit. Assume that, under general principles of tax law, both the seller and the buyer properly take into account such refund when paid. Assume also that the refund has no effect on the tax liability for the deemed sale tax consequences. This refund results in a decrease of T's ADSP and AGUB of $140, from $500 to $360.
(iv) The redetermined ADSP and AGUB of $360 is allocated among T's acquisition date assets. Because ADSP and AGUB do not exceed the fair market value of the Class V assets, the ADSP and AGUB amounts are allocated to the Class V assets in proportion to their fair market values at the beginning of the day after the acquisition date. Thus, $135 ($150 × ($360/($150 + $250))) is allocated to the machinery and $225 ($250 × ($360/($150 + $250))) is allocated to the land. Accordingly, the basis of the machinery is reduced by $15 ($150 original allocation - $135 redetermined allocation) and the basis of the land is reduced by $25 ($250 original allocation - $225 redetermined allocation). No amount is allocated to the Class VII assets. Accordingly, the basis of the goodwill and going concern value is reduced by $100 ($100 original allocation - $0 redetermined allocation).
(v) Assume that, as a result of deductions under section 168, the adjusted basis of the machinery immediately before the decrease in AGUB is zero. The machinery is treated as if it were disposed of before the decrease is taken into account. In 2007, T recognizes income of $15, the character of which is determined under the principles of Arrowsmith v. Commissioner and the tax benefit rule. No adjustment to the basis of T's assets is made for any tax paid on this amount. Assume also that, as a result of amortization deductions, the adjusted basis of the goodwill and going concern value immediately before the decrease in AGUB is $40. A similar adjustment to income is made in 2007 with respect to the $60 of previously amortized goodwill and going concern value.
(vi) In summary, the basis of T's acquisition date assets, as of January 1, 2007, is as follows:

Source

26 CFR § 1.338-7


Scoping language

None
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