single source drug

(7) Multiple source drug; innovator multiple source drug; noninnovator multiple source drug; single source drug (A) Defined (i) Multiple source drug The term “multiple source drug” means, with respect to a rebate period, a covered outpatient drug, including a drug product approved for marketing as a non-prescription drug that is regarded as a covered outpatient drug under paragraph (4), for which there 3 at least 1 other drug product which— (I) is rated as therapeutically equivalent (under the Food and Drug Administration’s most recent publication of “Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluations”), (II) except as provided in subparagraph (B), is pharmaceutically equivalent and bioequivalent, as defined in subparagraph (C) and as determined by the Food and Drug Administration, and (III) is sold or marketed in the United States during the period. (ii) Innovator multiple source drug The term “innovator multiple source drug” means a multiple source drug that is marketed under a new drug application approved by the Food and Drug Administration, unless the Secretary determines that a narrow exception applies (as described in section 447.502 of title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (or any successor regulation)). (iii) Noninnovator multiple source drug The term “noninnovator multiple source drug” means a multiple source drug that is not an innovator multiple source drug. (iv) Single source drug The term “single source drug” means a covered outpatient drug, including a drug product approved for marketing as a non-prescription drug that is regarded as a covered outpatient drug under paragraph (4), which is produced or distributed under a new drug application approved by the Food and Drug Administration, including a drug product marketed by any cross-licensed producers or distributors operating under the new drug applicationunless the Secretary determines that a narrow exception applies (as described in section 447.502 of title 42, Code of Federal Regulations (or any successor regulation)). Such term also includes a covered outpatient drug that is a biological product licensed, produced, or distributed under a biologics license application approved by the Food and Drug Administration. (B) Exception Subparagraph (A)(i)(II) shall not apply if the Food and Drug Administration changes by regulation the requirement that, for purposes of the publication described in subparagraph (A)(i)(I), in order for drug products to be rated as therapeutically equivalent, they must be pharmaceutically equivalent and bioequivalent, as defined in subparagraph (C). (C) Definitions For purposes of this paragraph— (i) drug products are pharmaceutically equivalent if the products contain identical amounts of the same active drug ingredient in the same dosage form and meet compendial or other applicable standards of strength, quality, purity, and identity; and (ii) drugs are bioequivalent if they do not present a known or potential bioequivalence problem, or, if they do present such a problem, they are shown to meet an appropriate standard of bioequivalence.

Source

42 USC § 1396r-8(k)(7)


Scoping language

For purposes of this paragraph
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