RULE 172.00.08-001 - State Plan for Career & Technical Education

RULE 172.00.08-001. State Plan for Career & Technical Education

ARKANSAS STATE FIVE-YEAR PLAN FOR THE CARL D. PERKINS CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION - JULY 1, 2008, THROUGH JUNE 30, 2013

Overview of Administration of Perkins in Arkansas

The Arkansas State Board of Workforce Education and Career Opportunities (SBWECO) is the sole state agency responsible for Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act funds. SBWECO, through the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education (DWE), oversees secondary career and technical education in the public school system and technical education in two public postsecondary technical institutes and one institution that is located within the Arkansas prison system. The director of DWE, who is employed by SBWECO and serves at the pleasure of the governor, is a member of the Arkansas Workforce Investment Board.

Since 1991, SBWECO has delegated responsibility for the administration and leadership of Perkins activities in institutions of higher education to the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board through a memorandum of understanding with the Arkansas Department of Higher Education (ADHE). In addition to responsibility for the higher education institutions, ADHE oversees the Perkins program in the two public technical institutes. The director of ADHE is also a member of the Arkansas Workforce Investment Board.

The administration and leadership funds that are available to the state are split between the Department of Workforce Education and Department of Higher Education through the memorandum of understanding. The staffs of the two departments work closely together to ensure coordination with regard to Perkins between the secondary and postsecondary programs.

There were 245 public school districts in the state eligible for Perkins funding during 2007-08. Of these, 101 received less than the $15,000 minimum required. However, of the 151 eligible to keep their own funds and manage their own Perkins programs, only 64 did so. The remaining districts joined one of 15 secondary consortia. Therefore, there were a total of 79 secondary recipients (including consortia) in 2007-08.

Students enrolled in for-credit CTE programs at the postsecondary level may receive a certificate of proficiency, a technical certificate, or an associate of applied science award. In Arkansas, there are eight four-year universities, 22 two-year colleges, and two technical institutes offering these programs that receive Perkins funding. Five universities, five colleges, and the two technical institutes are members of consortia. Three universities in Arkansas do not participate in Perkins programs.

I. PLANNING, COORDINATION, AND COLLABORATION -

1. Public Hearings

A series of three public hearings were held in the state between February 25 and March 14, 2008:

Pulaski Technical College in North Little Rock on February 26 with 32 in attendance

Great Rivers Educational Cooperative in Helena on March 4 with 6 in attendance

North Arkansas College in Harrison on March 11 with 15 in attendance

The public hearings were jointly planned and conducted by staff members from DWE and DHE. Two hearings were hosted by postsecondary institutions and one by a secondary educational cooperative. Prior to the public hearings, the draft State Plan was published on the Department's home page and a summary of major points was sent to all secondary and postsecondary school administrators and Perkins coordinators. In addition, the public hearing information was posted on the secondary CTE teacher list servs in the state. A legal notice was published in the state's major newspaper as required by the Arkansas Administrative Procedures Act. The State Plan was also reviewed by the Administrative Rules and Regulations Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council.

2. Recommendations from Public Hearings and Agency Response

Comment: $600,000 for the secondary reserve fund may not be sufficient.

Response: Although 10% of the local funds are allowed to be set aside by the state for the reserve fund, in 2007-08 the Department chose to set aside $600,000 (or about 7%) of the secondary allocation. In the 2008-09 fiscal year, secondary will again set aside $600,000 (which is almost 8%) of the local allocation into the reserve fund. The percentage increased (although the amount did not) because the overall state grant was less than the previous year. Postsecondary chose not to use the reserve in 2007-08 or in 2008-09. The State Plan allows the state to review funding levels and to reserve up to the full 10% each year as appropriate. No change in the State Plan is required.

Comment: Successful strategies employed by various districts should be shared with all recipients.

Response: DWE has already taken steps to ensure that information on successful projects is made available to all recipients. In addition, the evaluation criteria used by Department staff to approved projects will be more fully communicated at the Perkins workshop in April. This is a specific inservice training need and does not require any change in the State Plan.

Comment: The actual number of students in disaggregated data for special population groups may be too small to be significant.

Response: Secondary districts should use the same criteria as used by the state's NCLB plan for public reporting requirements. Postsecondary institutions should use the reporting policies they have in place to protect individual student identity. The following statement has been added to the Accountability and Evaluation section of the State Plan: "As required by the Act, local recipients must report performance results to the public in a variety of methods including electronically. However, all reports of performance should follow established guidelines that protect individual student identity."

Comment: Small districts are restricted by the high wage, high demand, and high skill requirement for program improvement.

Response: Perkins funds can be used to improve the performance of students in any program of study or support course (such as JAG or Internship). No change in the State Plan is recommended.

Comment: Give serious consideration to the types of programs that promote the most universally applicable skills and knowledge and that will help workers to better transition into new technologies and jobs. Focus on life-long learning skills and occupational areas that best fit this model and less on a narrow range of specific occupations.

Response: Perkins IV (and this state plan) does push the state toward broader career preparation through the career cluster model. The section of this state plan describing the programs that will be developed and improved discusses this movement and model. No change in the State Plan is required.

3. Consultations with academic and CTE teachers, faculty, and administrators; career guidance and academic counselors; eligible recipients; charter school authorizers and organizers consistent with State law; parents and students; institutions of higher education; entities participating in activities described in section 111 or Public Law 105-220; interested community members (including parents and community organizations); representatives of special populations; representatives of business and industry (including representatives of small business); and representatives of labor organizations in the State.

Multiple work sessions and meetings were held with the secondary and postsecondary eligible recipients during the transition year as the state plan was written. Representatives from the recipients included secondary and postsecondary administrators and CTE teachers. Several consultations were held with various specialists from the Department of Education (K-12 general education) who work with special population students and teachers, who plan the professional development for academic teachers, and who direct the literacy and math specialists in the secondary schools. The chief academic officers from the colleges and universities were consulted as were the presidents and chancellors.

A meeting was held with the Small Business Administration to explain the act and get input early in the plan development. The members of the Workforce Investment Board represent many business and industry sectors as well as labor organizations. A summary of the state plan was provided with the invitation to attend the public hearings to the WIA Board.

The Arkansas Administrative Procedures Act (described below) requires legislative review. The legislators on the review committee also represent several of the groups listed above.

4. Consultation with the Governor with respect to development of the State plan.

The DWE director consulted with the Governor and his staff regarding the policies contained in the plan - particularly changes that affect secondary and postsecondary institutions as the state plan is implemented at the local level. The Governor stated his approval of the State Plan on Monday, March 31, 2008.

5. Effective activities and procedures to allow individuals and entities listed in 3 and 4 above to participate in state and local decisions that relate to the development of the State plan.

DWE followed the requirements of the state's Administrative Procedures Act. A legal notice of 30 days of public review was placed in a newspaper with statewide circulation for a minimum of 3 days. The 30 days of public review began following the legal notice. A notice announcing the public review along with a brief summary of the issues addressed in the state plan was sent (via email or hard copy) to many of the groups listed in paragraph 3 above. The notice contained information on the four public hearings that were held around the state. In addition to the notices that were mailed, information on the public hearings was placed on the various listservs for the CTE teachers. The draft of the state plan was placed on the DWE and DHE websites during the 30 days of public review. Information on how to comment was included in the notices. All oral comments presented at the public hearings as well as all written comments submitted were considered in the final development of the state plan.

6. Consultation with State Agency for Community, Two-Year, and Technical Colleges The Department of Higher Education was a partner in developing the state plan and wrote the sections of the plan that pertain specifically to institutions of higher education. Staff from DHE participated as discussion leaders in the public hearings along with staff from DWE. Staff from DHE worked with the higher education institutions to develop the postsecondary performance definitions and targets contained in the state plan.

II. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

1. Preparation of a six-year state plan or a one-year transition plan.

Arkansas submitted a one-year transition plan for the 2007-08 fiscal year. This five-year plan has been prepared by the secondary and postsecondary career and technical education agencies described above - the Department of Workforce Education and the Department of Higher Education - with input from representatives of both levels. The State Board of Workforce Education and Career Opportunities approved this five-year state plan during a regular meeting on April 3, 2008.

2. The career and technical education activities to be assisted that are designed to meet or exceed the State adjusted levels of performance.

(a) Description of career and technical education programs of study that may be adopted by local educational agencies and postsecondary institutions to be offered as an option to students (and their parents as appropriate) when planning for and completing future coursework that -

(a) Incorporate secondary education and postsecondary education elements.

(b) Include coherent and rigorous content, aligned with challenging academic standards, and relevant career and technical content in a coordinated, non-duplicative progression of courses that align secondary education with postsecondary education to adequately prepare students to succeed in postsecondary education.

(c) May include the opportunity for secondary education students to participate in dual or concurrent enrollment programs or other ways to acquire postsecondary education credits.

(d) Lead to an industry-recognized credential or certificate at the postsecondary level, or an associate or baccalaureate degree.

Arkansas's career and technical system is based on the national model of 16 career clusters and 81 pathways. The state's existing approved programs of study were the basis for the cluster/pathway system. At the secondary level, at least one program of study is approved from each of the clusters. In all, 55 secondary programs of study are approved in 33 different pathways.

Postsecondary certificate and degree programs of study are approved by the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board and are reviewed by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools during the accreditation process for postsecondary institutions. There are currently 145 programs of study that have been designated as occupational in nature and assigned to career clusters and career pathways. Career pathways were formally introduced into postsecondary education in 2005 with 11 two-year institutions selected for the Career Pathways Initiative. This initiative has expanded to include all two-year colleges in the state. These pathways are designed to assist people from poverty (which includes many of the Perkins special population categories) to attain additional education and find employment.

The secondary and postsecondary state leadership has worked extensively with the Department of Workforce Services (the state's labor market information office) to identify the career pathways that are high skill, high wage, and high demand for Arkansas. As described in section B below, these identified career pathways are the state's focus for Perkins funds.

Certificates of proficiency require 7-18 credit hours; technical certificates require 24-42 credit hours; associate of applied science degrees require 60-72 credit hours; and bachelor's degrees require 120-136 credit hours. Certificate programs designed for professional certification or licensure also require documentation of approval by the appropriate agency or board. Programs are closely monitored by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education and are expected to meet rigid productivity requirements established by the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

With the efforts begun during Perkins III through the Tech Prep consortia, the state began to link the secondary and postsecondary programs several years ago. Arkansas law encourages the enrollment of high school students in college-level courses while still in high school through concurrent (high school- and college-level credit awarded) and dual enrollment (college-level credit awarded to high school students) programs. Articulation agreements linking secondary and postsecondary institutions also are negotiated between individual institutions to facilitate student achievement of postsecondary credentials. While not all CTE articulation was accomplished through the tech prep consortia, only the consortia collected data on the credit hours earned by students. More than CTE 35,000 articulated credit hours were reported each year for the past few years.

The state has a network of 25 secondary area career and technical education centers. These centers enroll students in CTE programs of study for a one- to three-hour block of time each day. Nine of the centers are operated by secondary school districts, while the remaining 16 are operated by postsecondary institutions. In many cases, the center is located on the college campus and may even share facilities with the college programs. This arrangement has allowed many high school students to receive concurrent credit for the CTE courses. Over 3,600 students earned 24,600 concurrent credit hours in the 2006-07 school year at the secondary centers. That is a $1.6 million value, or to put it another way, it equates to 200 bachelors degrees.

Secondary CTE programs of study are offered in every public school district in the state. To meet the state's Standards of Accreditation for Public Schools, each high school must offer access to a minimum of three CTE programs of study from three different pathways. Each program of study must be approved by the Department of Workforce Education and must include a minimum of three Carnegie units of credit. Any program of study and any course not approved by DWE cannot be offered for state graduation credit by school districts.

Each secondary program of study has a state-defined core of 1½ or 2 units of credit. In addition, each course must have a state-approved curriculum framework that describes what the students should know and be able to do upon completion of the course. Statewide end-of-course assessments are based on the frameworks and are used for the CTE skill attainment measure.

The state recently adopted the "Smart Core" for all high school students, which includes 4 units of English, 4 units of mathematics (Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra II, and a fourth math above Algebra II that might be Pre-Calculus, Trigonometry, Statistics, etc.), 3 units of natural science, 3 units of social studies, ½ unit of oral communications, ½ unit of physical education, ½ unit of health and safety, and ½ unit of fine arts. All students are enrolled in these units unless their parents meet with the school administration to sign a waiver requesting an alternative curriculum. All CTE programs of study are designed with this academic base for students. The Smart Core aligns with the requirements of the state's Academic Challenge Scholarship with the exception that the scholarship (which would cover most of the tuition cost at a state-supported institution) also requires two units of a foreign language.

National certification for CTE programs and/or teachers has been encouraged for several years. Automotive service technology and automotive collision programs must be NATEF-certified in order to be approved programs of study. Construction programs require NCCER certification to be approved. Recipients offering programs with national certifications have used Perkins funds to ensure their teachers are certified and to bring the programs into compliance for certification.

All new CTE programs of study developed and approved will include the secondary and postsecondary connections in the framework, will use the Smart Core as the academic base, and will identify the industry credential/certification available for students upon completion at the secondary level, if any, and the further education or apprenticeship opportunities after high school as well as the industry credentials available upon completion of those levels. The CCTI/NASDVTEc model template will be used to outline the academic and CTE sequence of courses.

As the career clusters and pathways were implemented in the state over the past few years at the secondary and postsecondary levels, the scope of CTE broadened - for example, at the secondary level the Arts career cluster was used to develop a Performing Arts pathway program in several districts. Within the Education and Training cluster, an associate of arts in Teaching with the secondary and postsecondary elements has been developed.

Career guidance and counseling was an important initiative under the previous Perkins act and continues to be under this state plan. One model that has been encouraged by DWE involves teachers as advisors with annual parental involvement. Commonly referred to in the state as career action planning, this model has been extremely effective in many districts. Some high schools can boast a rate of over 90% parental involvement in planning the student's educational program each year. Used appropriately, the career action plans direct the school administration in scheduling classes and staffing decisions since the students' career interests and programs of study are identified during the advising session.

In addition to the leadership funds at the secondary level, a reserve fund (described later in this plan) will target the development of new or expanded pathways/programs that have all of the elements described in this section and that are high skill, high wage, and high demand.

Secondary state leadership funds are being used to encourage interest in the career pathways that are high wage and high demand and that are targeted by our state's economic development agency as being of importance to the growth of the economy in our state. One initiative undertaken during 2007-08 was a conference to help middle school career orientation teachers and secondary counselors/administrators understand the manufacturing cluster and the many career fields available to students in that cluster. Through use of the Kuder career interest program, described in Section D below, state leaders know that student interest in the manufacturing cluster does not match the state's employment demands. Helping teachers and counselors understand the new manufacturing workplace is the first step in changing student interest.

At the postsecondary level, state leadership funds will be used to assist institutions in completing self-assessments to identify existing linkages between secondary and postsecondary and to develop an action plan to continue development of career pathways. State leadership funds will also be used to achieve greater transferability of CTE courses at the postsecondary level and to support efforts that result in statewide articulation agreements. When appropriate, ADHE may use reserve funds to target development of pathways that meet the academic and economic goals of the state.

Arkansas has adopted the WorkKeys assessment as its measure for workforce readiness and is implementing several initiatives related to the use of this system. For example, the Arkansas Economic Development Commission and the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services have begun issuing workforce readiness certificates at the bronze, silver and gold levels based upon WorkKeys assessment results for industry training programs. As this assessment becomes accepted within business and industry, CTE administrators are also incorporating the assessment into their programs as an option for students so they may take a "Career Readiness Certificate" with them upon graduation.

(b) Consultation with eligible recipients to develop and implement the career and technical programs of study.

DWE has encouraged the development of new programs of study, particularly in pathways not currently offered in the state, through leadership in designing the program curriculum frameworks and offering funding for pilot projects with either state funds or Perkins leadership funds. State funds available to DWE will continue to be used for developing new programs of study in all areas. However, Perkins funds will be used to develop programs of study in pathways that are designated high skill, high wage, and high demand. Arkansas is going to use the requirement of all three designations to focus the small amount of federal funds into targeted areas that will impact economic development in the state.

At the postsecondary level, during the approval process for new programs of study, the requesting institution must demonstrate how the program is responsive to needs of the local community. Funding of new programs using local Perkins funds will be approved if the program fits all three of the high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand definitions or if the program has been designated as one related to emerging industries. Funding of new programs may also be approved for programs that are needed to complete a secondary to postsecondary pathway, programs that facilitate transition from sub-baccalaureate to baccalaureate programs and/or for programs that increase nontraditional participation.

In the fall of 2006, a core team of individuals with responsibility for overseeing the Perkins funds at the state, consortia, and local level began meeting monthly to identify the issues and work through the requirements in the new Act. The core team met separately as secondary and postsecondary groups and also met together to discuss issues that impact the entire system of CTE.

The designation and development of the high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand list of pathways was a work undertaken between the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services (the state's Labor Market Information and WIA/unemployment agency) and DWE and ADHE. The core team reviewed the list - using different scenarios for the high-wage definition. After much discussion, the consensus of the team was to use the definition of 20 percent above the average wage for all occupations in Arkansas as high wage. Using national crosswalks, occupational data was categorized by CIP code and placed into appropriate pathways and career clusters. Any pathway in which 50 percent or more of the occupations met the high-wage definition was designated as a high-wage pathway. A committee from the core team studied the crosswalks used to match the occupational data to the pathways and met with the Department of Workforce Services staff to determine final designations.

For high demand, the team adopted the Department of Workforce Services high-demand list that is used for other economic and workforce development purposes - such as the workforce investment boards for expenditure of their funds. Any pathway in which 50 percent or more of the occupations were on the high-demand list was designated as a high-demand pathway.

For high skill, any pathway that leads to a postsecondary award or an apprenticeship was designated as high skill in the secondary sector. At the postsecondary level, any pathway that leads to a baccalaureate or higher degree or leads to an occupation that requires certification or licensure was designated as high skill.

Using these three criteria, there are 35 pathways that are on the high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand list for the 2008-09 fiscal year. There are 44 programs of study currently offered at the postsecondary level in these pathways. There are 20 programs of study currently offered at the secondary level in these pathways.

Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

Animal Systems

Food Products and Processing Systems

Plant Systems

Architecture and Construction

Construction

Arts, A/V Technology and Communications

Telecommunications

Business, Management and Administration Services

Business Analysis

Business Financial Management and Accounting

Human Resources

Management

Marketing

Education and Training

Administration and Administrative Support

Professional Support Services (Education)

Teaching & Training

Finance

Banking and Related Services

Business Financial Management

Financial and Investment Planning

Insurance Services

Government and Public Administration

Foreign Service

Public Management and Administration

Regulation

Revenue and Taxation

Health Science

Health Informatics

Human Services

Consumer Services

Early Childhood Development & Services

Information Technology

Information Support and Services

Interactive Media

Network Systems

Programming and Software Development

Manufacturing

Production

Marketing, Sales and Service

E-Marketing

Management and Entrepreneurship

Marketing Communication and Promotion

Marketing Information Management & Research

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics

Logistics Planning and Management Services

(c) Support for eligible recipients in developing and implementing articulation agreements between secondary education and postsecondary education institutions.

The state will build on the success of articulation agreements in place as a result of the tech prep initiative. The goal for articulation is to have an integrated system of statewide agreements in place. The state legislature is very inclined toward statewide agreements. During the previous legislative session, a bill was passed that required establishment of a statewide transfer system for core courses among all public postsecondary institutions, resulting in the creation of the Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS). This system contains information about the transferability of more than 90 general education courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and equitable treatment in the application of general education credits for admissions and degree requirements. Students may complete specified general education courses anywhere in the public system as well as many courses in the degree/major that have been pre-identified for transfer. Additional information on the ACTS is accessible at http://acts.adhe.edu. Although the impetus for this project was a legislative directive, there is now a growing interest in expanding the project to include career and technical courses. And with so many individual articulation agreements and concurrent credit possibilities in place already in career and technical courses, secondary CTE and DWE will work collaboratively to establish an integrated system of statewide articulation agreements between secondary and postsecondary institutions. ADHE already has begun discussions with postsecondary chief academic officers regarding expansion of the ACTS system to include CTE courses.

(d) Availability of information at the secondary level about career and technical programs of study offered by eligible recipients.

A model for career action planning was developed under Perkins III and has become widely implemented. This model encourages annual involvement of parents and uses teachers as advisors. The Arkansas Department of Education has encouraged the adoption of this model and even allows schools to count the student/parent advisement days under this model as student attendance days. Some districts have as high as 98 percent parental involvement for their high school students each year. The advisors review the programs of study and activities available with the students and parents as they discuss the students' attainment and interests.

The state also has used the web-based Kuder career planning system as one way to help direct students in the discovery of their career interests, skills, and work values beginning in seventh grade and continuing into postsecondary education and adulthood. Kuder users will be able to document career development activities, education and work-related experiences, community service, special skills, honors, and goals in their electronic portfolio. Students can retrieve this information at any time as they apply for jobs, internships, college, scholarships, or other opportunities where a record of these activities is essential. With access to the Internet, they will be able to access their portfolio at any time and from any location.

DWE is using some state leadership funds for the development of a series of career cluster publications to target high school students that highlight Arkansas business and industry leaders, particularly nontraditional role models. The first two of these publications, titled Future Focus, are for the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics and the Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security career clusters. Although hard copies were printed and sent to all schools, the magazines also are available online at the department's Web site (http://dwe.arkansas.gov/careerclusters/careerclusters.htm).

(e) The secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs to be carried out, including programs to develop, improve, and expand access to appropriate technology in career and technical education programs.

One model for expanding and improving technology at the secondary level is the incorporation of the EAST Initiative into the CTE programs of study. EAST is the Environmental and Spatial Technology, Inc. Founded in Greenbrier, Arkansas, in 1996, the EAST Initiative has grown to more than 170 schools in seven states. The EAST model is grounded in solid pedagogical theory related to the use of technology as a catalyst for learning, collaborative learning, and performance-based learning. Research outcomes that support the EAST model show the following can occur when using this model:

* Technology is used to promote collaboration, higher order thinking, and problem solving.

* Professional development is an important component of the education technology program.

* Technology is effectively integrated into the curriculum.

* Students are allowed to select appropriate technology tools to obtain, analyze, synthesize, and assimilate information.

* Effective use of technology allows the creation of new learning environments.

* Home/school connections are enhanced through technology.

* There is adequate access to technology for all students.

* Teachers encourage students to utilize technology to find and make sense of information.

Another model for expanding access for technology is the Internet & Computer Core Certification (IC3), which is a standards-based certification program for basic computer and Internet literacy. IC3 provides specific guidelines for the knowledge and skills required to be a functional user of computer hardware, software, networks, and the Internet. By establishing this vendor-independent standard, IC3 provides a reliable, universal measure of basic computing and Internet skills.

IC3 consists of three different competency exams. Passing all three IC3 exams qualifies an individual to receive IC3 certification.

* Computing Fundamentals: This exam measures knowledge of computer hardware, software, and basic operating system skills.

* Key Applications: This exam evaluates proficiency in two computer applications (a word processor and spreadsheet) and the common features of different applications.

* Living Online: This exam measures basic skills in using networks, electronic mail, the Internet, and Web browsing software as well as an understanding of how computers and the Internet affect society.

The appropriate mix of linear and performance-based testing questions to measure the knowledge, skills, and abilities of candidates for IC3 ensures a high degree of validity, reliability, and impartiality for all participants in the program.

In addition to encouraging industry certifications, DWE, through continuous revision of the curriculum frameworks for courses, seeks industry input to ensure that the content, and therefore the appropriate industry-standard technology, for teaching CTE programs is current.

At the postsecondary level, significant efforts are made to incorporate into classroom instruction the type of cutting-edge technology that students are likely to find upon entering the workplace. New programs have been approved for advanced manufacturing with Perkins funds used to develop curriculum and purchase equipment that will serve a consortium of five institutions. Allied health programs have provided software-based mannequins with a sophisticated reality sufficient to substitute as required clinical experience in rural areas with limited clinical locations. Using Perkins funds, one institution established a model virtual hospital to provide a complete real-life learning experience for students across all allied health programs, and this approach is being duplicated by other institutions. Another institution has provided PDAs to nursing students to assist them with textbook and reference materials while on-site during clinical exercises. Programs of study have been approved for geographic information systems complete with computer hardware and software systems used to store, display, analyze, and map information. While these programs prepare students for a broad spectrum of employment options, they are intended primarily for agricultural uses in some of the most rural and economically depressed sections of Arkansas.

The presence of distance-delivered postsecondary instruction continues to grow. Several postsecondary institutions are offering entire degree programs online. In addition to Web-based instruction, institutions utilize a variety of other distance learning technologies, including electronic discussion group classes, videoconferencing, and courses that include both traditional and online components of instruction.

Perkins funds will continue to be used to support the effective use of technology, including online instruction, and state leadership monies will continue to provide professional development to support these efforts. New technology and equipment purchase guidelines have been established for postsecondary funding with requirements related to business and industry standards and for use in high-skill, high-wage, high-demand or emerging industry program areas. This assures that technology is effectively integrated into the curriculum and that suitable equipment is available for student preparation for employment.

(f) The criteria that will be used to approve eligible recipients for funds under the Act, including criteria to assess the extent to which the local plan will promote continuous improvement in academic achievement; promote continuous improvement of technical skill attainment; and identify and address current or emerging occupational opportunities.

Each recipient must submit a five-year local plan that will span 2008-09 through 2012-13. In addition to the local plan, each recipient must submit an annual application that describes exactly how the funds for each year will be expended. A copy of the minimum requirements for the local plan is included as Attachment 1. Once the five-year plan is submitted, subsequent annual applications must support and be consistent with the five-year plan although amendment of the five-year plan is also an option each year.

The secondary annual application (Attachment 2) includes the previous year's accountability results and requires that the recipient address those results in the application. The secondary application is a Web-based portal that includes other pieces of the secondary CTE accountability system - some pieces are used in reporting on performance indicators and others are used within the broader CTE evaluation system for the state. As Perkins IV is implemented, historical performance results will be available to recipients though this Web-based portal. Currently, recipients have to go to additional Web sites to access previous year's performance data.

The postsecondary annual application (Attachment 3) will be based on previous year results and will require recipients to address deficient performance measures (individual indicators or projects that cut across all indicators) or implement projects that support development of a career pathway. The existing Web-based portal has been redesigned to allow for the submission and approval of local transition plans, five-year plans, and annual applications. The site can be accessed at www.adheperkins.com and was designed to provide current and historical accountability information for both state and local recipients.

In addition to annual plan management, the accountability section of the site includes a performance report card beginning with program year 2004 that includes historical information on program effectiveness, a return on investment analysis, use of funds by indicator and function, and historical enrollment and allocations levels. This report is available for each local recipient and forms the basis of the accountability portion of the on-site compliance visit. The site also includes technical information such as program of study crosswalks, high-skill, high-wage, high-demand, emerging industry CIP codes, and other resources for program improvement for use by local recipients and state staff that should promote continuous improvement in all performance areas. The site will continue to be updated and serve as the first point of reference for postsecondary Perkins matters.

The local five-year plan and local application must be submitted in substantially approvable form prior to July 1, 2008, in order for the recipient to begin obligating funds. The state's definition of "substantially approvable" is that the Perkins plan and application are complete and generally acceptable even though some projects/activities may need minor revision.

The criteria for approval will include action to determine that all funds are directed toward projects/activities that identify the performance indicator that will be addressed by the expenditure of the funds or that identify the program of study within the high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand pathway that is being improved. The method of measurement must be identified in the project/activity description.

Any recipient who fails to submit the local plan and/or local application in substantially approvable form by November 1 or who still has portions of the annual application that are not approvable and who does not have a signed waiver from DWE or ADHE allowing additional time for submission may lose the ability to file the plan and/or application for that year.

(g) How programs at the secondary level will prepare career and technical education students, including special populations, to graduate from secondary school with a diploma.

The basis for all career guidance and planning is the state's Smart Core program as described in Section (a) above. This academic base is recommended for all students. Two programs specifically designed to assist special populations in succeeding academically in the CTE programs are the STRIVE and JAG programs described in the Provision of Services to Special Populations Section that follows. In addition to these special programs, many local recipients have used Perkins funds to purchase reading pens and voice recognition software to assist students with reading difficulties. A professional development strand at the summer conference is planned that will provide additional strategies for teachers to assist them with instruction of special population students.

DWE also oversees a state fund that provides adaptive equipment for students enrolled in CTE programs. These state monies provide specialized equipment and software that enable students such as those with physical disabilities to succeed in CTE courses. The districts may apply for these funds and will keep the equipment until the student graduates or until it is no longer needed. At that point, usable equipment is returned to the state for reassignment.

As frameworks for the secondary programs of study are revised over the next few years, the postsecondary components, as well as the options in immediate employment, will be clearly identified so students can see the opportunities that await them following completion of the program of study and graduation from high school.

Career and technical student organizations are an integral part of all program areas. These organizations provide students with the opportunity to reinforce the skills, knowledge, and attitudes taught in the classroom as well as leadership skills and opportunities. This can be an effective way to integrate academic and technology programs that enhance students' ability to focus on tools needed to graduate from high school.

(h) How such programs will prepare career and technical education students, including special populations, academically and technically for opportunities in postsecondary education or entry into high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations in current or emerging occupations, and how participating students will be made aware of such opportunities.

As briefly discussed above, the state has adopted a career action planning (CAP) model that involves parents. In the CAP model, advisors help students and their parents identify the students' strengths and weaknesses and plan their academic and CTE coursework during high school. The state has invested in providing the Kuder career assessment system for every Arkansas student at both the secondary and postsecondary level. The Kuder system allows students to assess their career interests and explore the types of jobs available within each career. Information on typical wages, educational preparation, etc., is available within the Kuder system. Links to every postsecondary institution in the state are included so students may explore their opportunities. Since the Kuder system is Web-based, it may be accessed from any Internet-connected computer; therefore parents also have access to this information. Students may create a portfolio and a resume online. As long as they access their information annually, their account will remain active after graduation.

In most districts, Kuder is introduced to students in the eighth grade during a career orientation course, which is designed to be an introduction to all career clusters and provide information on the CTE programs of study available at each local high school. The majority of eighth graders in the state are enrolled in the career orientation course.

Having information readily available to students and parents is only one part of preparing students and making them aware of opportunities. Equally important is the quality of the programs of study at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Recipients of Perkins funds must address how their approved programs will meet the following criteria:

* Provide students with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of an industry, including work-based learning opportunities;

* Align courses at the secondary and postsecondary levels;

* Provide professional development for teachers, administrators, and counselors;

* Include business and industry representatives and representatives of special populations in the evaluation and development of programs; and

* Identify and adopt strategies to overcome barriers for success of special populations in the CTE programs.

It is the state's goal that by the end year of Perkins IV, approximately 60 percent of all funds will be spent to improve programs of study that are designated as high skill, high wage, and high demand. This goal assumes that most recipients will be successful in meeting the local-adjusted levels of performance on the indicators and, therefore, will be able to invest funds into the programs of study meeting all three of these designations. However, any recipient not meeting the performance indicators will be held accountable for improving performance first before investing in a specific program of study at the expense of improving attainment of all CTE students.

(i) How funds will be used to improve or develop new career and technical education courses at the secondary level that are aligned with rigorous and challenging academic content standards and student academic achievement standards adopted by the State under section 1111(b)(1) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended; that are relevant and challenging at the postsecondary level; and that lead to employment in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations.

Current programs of study at the secondary level are aligned with academic content standards and achievement standards as the frameworks are revised. New programs of study will be aligned during the development of the frameworks. The academic foundation for all programs of study is the state's Smart Core (discussed above). Local recipients will be encouraged to pool their funds with other recipients to develop new programs of study in pathways that are high skill, high wage, and high demand. At the secondary level, the state will implemented a reserve fund for the development of high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand programs of study. In subsequent years, use of the reserve option may be expanded to provide incentives for performance or other purposes that help move the state CTE system toward meeting the purposes of the Act.

In addition to using the reserve option at the secondary level, state leadership funds also may be used to help local recipients align the secondary and postsecondary components in new programs of study during the development and implementation process.

At the postsecondary level, approval for development or delivery of new courses will be limited to those in CIP codes that have been designated as high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand programs of study, emerging industries, or programs designated as nontraditional. Approval also may be given for courses that are needed in order to complete or enhance an existing career pathway that includes secondary, associate, and baccalaureate and above program elements.

(j) How the state will facilitate and coordinate communications on best practices among successful recipients of tech prep program grants under Title II and other eligible recipients to improve program quality and student achievement.

Not applicable - Arkansas will consolidate all of the tech prep program funds available under Title II into the basic grant.

(k) Linking academic and career and technical education effectively at the secondary level and at the postsecondary level to increase student academic and career and technical achievement.

One method for linking academic and CTE that is being discussed by local administrators is to employ academic coaches to work with CTE teachers to ensure they are given the tools and knowledge to link to academic education and to assist them in the process. This resource has been available for academic teachers and will now be expanded to include the CTE teachers.

Helping CTE teachers identify academic concepts in their curriculum that are tested on the state's assessments used for NCLB is another method to increase student academic attainment. Through a model that uses the released items each year from the academic assessments, teachers are guided through exercises that assist them in using actual test questions that can be related to the CTE content as it is taught in the classroom and lab.

At the state level, development and continuous updating of the CTE curriculum frameworks helps ensure that both the academic and technical standards are current. As frameworks are updated, the connection to postsecondary opportunities and industry certification will be emphasized more than in the past to help teachers make students aware of the transitions that are available to them after high school.

At the postsecondary level, state leadership funds may be used to fund projects that encourage development of a variety of integration models, including creation of interdisciplinary courses that combine both CTE and academic elements, applied academic courses, cross-curricular incorporation of academic skills in CTE programs, incorporating academic modules in CTE courses, learning communities, professional development for academic faculty, and other appropriate approaches.

(l) How the state will report on the integration of coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards in career and technical education programs in order to adequately evaluate the extent of such integration.

At the secondary level, the evaluation of integration of content hinges upon the state's ability to effectively identify the population of students that CTE must be held accountable for assisting - those students enrolled in CTE programs or sequences. While almost every student takes one or two CTE course in grades 9-12, about 25-30 percent of the students actually focus or concentrate their course taking within a program of study. These students who are concentrating in a sequence are the students that CTE must take responsibility for to ensure improvement of their academic and technical skill attainment.

Because the state's literacy assessment is given at the end of the 11th grade, early identification and intervention is imperative. The NCLB math assessment is currently based on algebra and geometry - of which geometry is the last statewide math assessment. Many students take geometry in the 10th grade and a majority of students have completed it by the end of the 11th grade. Again, early identification and intervention is important. Recipients will be encouraged to ensure integration of academic standards into CTE courses taken primarily in the ninth and 10th grade and then begin working on the 11th- and 12th-grade courses.

The effectiveness of the integration will be assessed through the academic and technical skill attainment performance measures.

At the postsecondary level, the effectiveness of integration activities will be assessed through technical skills attainment and completion performance measures. Local recipients also will be required to provide an evaluation of integration activities in the annual end-of-year program report.

3. Comprehensive professional development (including initial teacher preparation and activities that support recruitment) for CTE teachers, faculty, administrators, and career guidance and academic counselors that will be provided, especially professional development that --

(a) Promotes the integration of coherent and rigorous academic content standards and career and technical education curricula, including through opportunities for academic and CTE teachers to jointly develop and implement curricula and pedagogical strategies;

(b) Increases the percentage of teachers that meet teacher certification or licensing requirement;

(c) Is high quality, sustained, intensive, and focused on instruction, and increases the academic knowledge and understanding of industry standards, as appropriate, of CTE teachers;

(d) Encourages applied learning that contributes to the academic and CTE knowledge of the student;

(e) Provides the knowledge and skills needed to work with and improve instruction for special populations; and

(f) Promotes integration with professional development activities that the State carries out under Title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended, and Title II of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended.

Secondary

As local recipients addressed their plans for expenditures in 2007-08, DWE staff reviewers emphasized the need for a three-year plan of professional development for every CTE teacher. Under Perkins III, the recipients were more accustomed to thinking of activities that could be accomplished in one year increments. With the implementation of Perkins IV, DWE is encouraging projects that span multiple years that are broader in scope and that will result in improvement of an entire program of study - including curriculum, teacher development, certification for the program/students, parent and business/industry involvement, postsecondary connections, equipment, etc.

DWE is a member of the statewide Professional Development Cabinet. The Cabinet is in the process of redefining professional development for teachers and developing an Arkansas Tool Kit for Quality Professional Development. The professional development for both academic education and CTE will be included in the development by the Cabinet. The Cabinet has partnered with the National Staff Development Council to develop materials for the Tool Kit. The Tool Kit will address seven major areas related to planning, implementing, and evaluating high quality professional development: Focusing on Student Achievement; Planning Results-Driven Professional Development; Effective Professional Development; Scheduling Time for Effective Professional Development; The Role of the Principal and Central Office Staff; Evaluation of Professional Development; and Shaping School Culture.

Arkansas has a strong history of continuing professional development for teacher licensure - in fact, sixty hours are required each year for teachers and administrators to maintain their licensure. These sixty hours must meet the professional development guidelines set forth by the Legislature and the State Board of Education. All professional development activities must related to the following focus areas: K-12 content; instructional strategies; assessment; advocacy/leadership; systemic change process; standards, frameworks, and curriculum alignment; supervision; mentoring/coaching; education technology; principles of learning/developmental stages; cognitive research; parent involvement; and building a collaborative learning community. All professional development opportunities provided by DWE for secondary educators have the focus areas identified along with the number of hours. The Department maintains a web page that lists all inservice opportunities.

DWE program staff met with the literacy and math specialist leader in the Department of Education (general education) to discuss initiatives in literacy and mathematics that Perkins recipients have proposed to use to improve performance on the academic attainment indicator. This meeting was very helpful to understanding the research and initiatives already in place in the state and how they can be related to CTE and adapted as needed. It also helped to clarify for the Department of Education the gap in professional development opportunities that exists in some districts for the academic teachers as compared to CTE teachers. Some administrators are not fully aware of the need to involve CTE teachers in professional development for literacy and math teaching strategies.

One tool DWE is making available to CTE teachers is the Max Teaching with Reading and Writing strategies. Several districts have implemented these teaching strategies in all classes, including CTE. One district co-hosted with DWE a workshop with over 100 participants from across the state during the fall of 2008. At least three more workshops (one in each congressional district) are being planned.

Using state leadership funds set aside to address nontraditional education and training, DWE hosted a conference entitled "Manufacturing: A New Vision - Women Mentors can Change the Future." This conference was designed to help school administrators, guidance counselors, and middle school career orientation teachers to understand the manufacturing career cluster. Several industry leaders provided sessions on modern manufacturing and the multitude of careers available.

DWE is a co-sponsor of the annual conference for the Arkansas Association for Career and Technical Education with Arkansas ACTE. The 2008 summer conference was focused on meeting Perkins performance indicators - with a strand on assisting special population students.

Although the agency has always focused a great deal of attention on professional development and inservice opportunities for administrators and teachers, the implementation of Perkins IV highlighted the need for greater opportunities for the CTE state staff to participate in such training. The state staff members are primarily former teachers and administrators - some have been out of the classroom for several years. The DWE leadership team has made a concentrated effort to locate professional development opportunities for the staff responsible for working directly with schools and teachers.

In addition to participating in all of the professional development mentioned above, six DWE program staff members attended a train-the-trainer session on MAX Teaching in Oklahoma City to assist in providing resources to the districts. The program staff also participated in a work session by Susan Katzman on integration. Work sessions with various members of the Department of Education staff have included topics such as serving special education students, assessment regulations with respect to students with Individual Education Plans, transition opportunities and services, teacher licensure regulations, etc.

Postsecondary

Postsecondary institutions have strong programs of professional development for faculty and staff. Annual in-service programs are provided that address issues related to student learning, student retention and degree attainment. Opportunities are provided for CTE faculty to stay abreast of industry changes and to obtain certification in their fields in order to better prepare students for the workplace. Additionally, each institution evaluates faculty performance annually which often results in individual professional development plans for faculty. To compliment these institutionally funded activities, Perkins basic grants are used to fund professional development required to achieve performance targets. Several institutions have opened local professional development events to other postsecondary institutions and the Perkins postsecondary consortia use professional development to meet the mutually beneficial requirement for expenditure of funds.

ADHE and postsecondary institutions in Arkansas are participants in a number of special programs that include professional development components. ADHE will seek to coordinate the professional development efforts of these various initiatives to effectively leverage all resources to improve statewide academic success results. Specifically, the Achieve the Dream initiative includes a requirement for statewide professional development. Postsecondary Perkins will collaborate in these activities and coordinate with the Arkansas Career Pathways Initiative in the delivery of professional development.

State leadership funds will be used to provide professional development that target postsecondary core indicators for technical skill attainment, retention and completion. Because almost half of all postsecondary Perkins concentrators receive Pell assistance or are designated as economically disadvantaged, professional development activities will address students coming from poverty. In collaboration with the Arkansas Career Pathways Initiative, workshops will be held to help faculty and staff better understand and address the special needs of lower income students and other special population categories. State leadership funds will be used to develop a statewide strategy for nontraditional students, including professional development needs. Professional development will be offered on career readiness, KeyTrain instruction and WorkKeys certification.

State leadership funds will be used to provide training for Perkins state staff in the areas of career and technical education, issues related to higher education, and in targeted areas such as workforce development.

4. Efforts that the agency and eligible recipients will make to improve -

(a) the recruitment and retention of CTE teachers, faculty, and career guidance and academic counselors, including individuals in groups underrepresented in the teaching profession; and

(b) the transition to teaching from business and industry, including small business.

The Department of Education hosts recruiting fairs for teachers, including recruiting persons from business/industry into teaching through the alternative licensure program. Teachers and counselors for CTE programs are included as are all other teaching areas. DWE has not had a separate recruitment initiative to distract from this statewide effort to bring in potential teachers. DWE staff does provide new teacher professional development for all new teachers in CTE - whether the teachers are from regular colleges of education or are coming in through alternative licensure. For teachers in the technical fields where prior industry experience is the usual path to teaching (such as construction, welding, automotive technology, etc), additional professional development opportunities are planned and conducted by DWE staff. In addition, the DWE staff assists these teachers in taking the NOCTI test which is required for licensure.

One of the strongest potential recruiting tools that has been in development for the past couple of years is the program of study in the Education and Training career cluster. Several districts have already implemented this program and many more have expressed an interest. Further development of the program, through the reserve fund grants and through the development of an associate of arts in teaching with postsecondary institutions, should impact the recruitment in CTE areas. Further development of the program, through the secondary reserve fund grants and through increased linkages from secondary to the associate of arts in teaching should impact the recruitment in CTE areas.

Business and industry professionals with practical experience in their fields are widely used as adjunct teaching faculty at postsecondary institutions. They are recruited through a variety of means: from service on industry advisory councils, traditional advertising, information campaigns directed to targeted business and industry, online methods, recruitment fairs, and efforts directed to a specialized field such as allied health. Some institutions pay travel costs for interviews,

Once hired, support is provided to equip new faculty members with skills needed for effective teaching and to contribute to retention of the new instructor. New instructors are assigned to work with experienced faculty partners who mentor new faculty members in areas such as course development, delivery techniques, assessment methodology and other related areas. Tuition waivers are provided for new faculty to take college level work that will prepare them for classroom instruction, and paraprofessionals may be provided to assist the new instructor as they begin classroom instruction.

5. Efforts that the agency and eligible recipients will make to improve the transition of sub-baccalaureate CTE students into baccalaureate degree programs at institutions of higher education.

The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) is a postsecondary education resource that provides comparable course information to facilitate student transfer within Arkansas public colleges and universities. The system helps high school students as well as associate degree holders plan a course of study that includes baccalaureate level work. Efforts are currently underway to add CTE coursework to the system.

New programs of study have been approved to enhance the transferability of associate level career and technical degrees toward a baccalaureate degree. The Bachelor of Professional Studies, the Bachelor of Applied Technology, the Bachelor of Applied Science, and the Associate of Arts in Teaching have been established to serve students who have completed a technical career focus and provide them with a path to upper-level electives that can be career specific. These degree programs allow students to transfer credits earned at the two-year level toward a baccalaureate degree.

University centers on the campuses of two-year colleges offer the first two years of full traditional college education that is transferable to a four-year university. Many baccalaureate programs are offered by four-year institutions on two-year campuses.

6. How parents, academic and CTE teachers, administrators, faculty, career guidance and academic counselors, local business (including small businesses), and labor organizations will be actively involved in the planning, development, implementation, and evaluation of CTE programs in the state.

Business/industry advisory councils are required for all programs of study. Programs without an active advisory council (proof of a minimum of two meetings per year) are placed on conditional approval and are disapproved after the second year. During the on-site state monitoring visit, the minutes of the meetings are reviewed to ensure that the councils are actively involved in the programs.

As the frameworks for the programs of study are reviewed (a minimum of 20% annually), business/industry representatives validate the framework and the assessment questions.

Through the High School That Work sites, student and teacher evaluations of the programs are made available to the state. The input from these evaluations is used to help guide the improvement and development efforts for new and existing programs of study.

As local recipients use the Perkins funds to improve a program of study, they must identify how each of the groups (teachers, administrators, counselors, parents, students, and business/industry) will be involved and made aware of the program. Specific questions were added to the local annual application to ensure that recipients considered this particular requirement.

Postsecondary institutions involve stakeholders in the development and evaluation of CTE programs in a variety of ways. Common to most campuses are business and industry advisory councils that provide input on program development which insures that occupational skills necessary for success in the workplace are present. Additionally, programs are evaluated annually by students, faculty, academic deans and program directors with recommendations implemented when possible.

7. Efforts that the agency and eligible recipients will make to -

(a) Improve the academic and technical skills of students participating in CTE programs, including by strengthening the academic and career/technical components of CTE programs through the integration of academics with CTE to ensure learning in -

i. The core academic subjects (as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended); and

ii. CTE subjects;

(b) Provide students with strong experience in, and understanding of, all aspects of an industry; and

(c) Ensure that students who participate in career and technical education programs are taught to the same challenging academic proficiencies as taught to all other students.

The Smart Core curriculum (described in section 2 above) was introduced by the State Board of Education in Arkansas a few years ago - with full support of DWE. All CTE programs of study are developed with the Smart Core curriculum as the academic base.

A major shift in funding occurred during 2007-08 at the local level to support projects that address literacy attainment for CTE concentrators. A significant amount of local funding was also focused on math. Only projects that ensured integration of literacy and math into CTE programs were approved. Potential behavioral change in the CTE teachers was evaluated.

DWE has used state leadership funds to investigate and promote strategies for improving academic attainment through CTE courses. One example is the MAX Teaching conferences held in each of the four congressional districts during the 2007-08 school year.

As new programs are developed and as programs are improved with Perkins funds, recipients must address how students will be provided with experiences that expose them to all aspects of an industry. Work-based learning opportunities such as job shadowing and internship are encouraged. Arkansas also has state funding for youth apprenticeship programs as well as state legislation that allows a tax break for employers of students in the youth apprenticeship programs.

At the postsecondary level, communications and mathematics academic courses are required for all technical certificates and above. Associate of applied science degrees require 15 hours of general education in additional to the required technical core. CTE students are held to the same academic standard for course completion as are non-CTE students.

8. How local educational agencies, area career and technical education schools, and eligible institutions in the State will be provided with technical assistance.

At the postsecondary level, technical assistance will be provided during annual on-site visits to local recipients. Two multi-day workshops will be held annually to provide technical assistance for postsecondary coordinators and administrators. New coordinator training will be provided annually to all coordinators with less than three years' experience with the Perkins program. The postsecondary Perkins Web site will provide an array of resources for program development, performance measurement, and professional development opportunities. A coordinator handbook was published in 2006 and will continue to be provided to all coordinators in hard copy. The handbook also is available online.

At the secondary level, technical assistance is provided in a variety of ways - depending upon the recipient's need. Program supervisors conduct an on-site visit to every school starting up a new program of study during the first year of operation. All new CTE teachers are provided with a new teacher orientation professional development that includes technical assistance as needed. The state also provides a grant from state funds for a CTE coordinator that is located at each of the state's 15 educational cooperatives. This regional coordinator is a resource for technical assistance to teachers and administrators - particularly at those districts that do not have a full-time CTE administrator on staff.

On-site technical assistance is given 20 percent of all public school districts annually - particularly with regard to state policies and procedures for approved programs. With the implementation of Perkins IV, additional emphasis will be given to monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of activities conducted with the funding. The state staff members who review and approve the local applications are also on the on-site technical assistance teams. Staff will compare what the recipient stated the activity would include and accomplish against the actual results. Beginning with the 2008-09 fiscal year, DWE intends to include a representative from the Arkansas Rehabilitation Services agency on the technical assistance teams to assist with the transition plans for special populations students as they leave secondary school.

A risk management plan will be implemented with regard to Perkins fiscal accountability by local recipients to supplement the cyclical technical assistance plan. The department is developing the risk management plan during the 2007-08 fiscal year that will cover both secondary and postsecondary recipients with regard to Perkins funds. The plan will include both program and financial risk indicators for Perkins.

Several factors have been discussed for inclusion in the risk management plan as factors that will place a recipient in a higher risk category. These include, but are not limited to, the following: the size of the recipient's grant - larger grants carry a higher risk; use of funds for salary - the lack of personnel activity reports to document expenditures is often cited in federal monitoring of various programs; tardiness in filing applications and reports; turnover of staff responsible for Perkins administration; failure to meet performance targets; and, for secondary recipients, identification as in academic or financial distress by other state agencies or other federal grant programs.

Another factor on the financial risk management will be inappropriate cash management. Any recipient that has not requested reimbursement by December 31 of each fiscal year will be contacted and its program will be assessed to ensure timely implementation of all approved projects and activities. Any recipient that has not requested reimbursement of expenditures by March 31 will be cited as a higher risk. Any recipient that holds all expenditures and requests reimbursement at the end of the fiscal year will be automatically placed on the monitoring list for the following year.

9. How CTE relates to state and regional occupational opportunities.

Before a new CTE program can be implemented, either with federal or local funds, the school must submit justification for the need - through employment data, employer surveys, community support, etc. The Perkins funds, as described earlier, are strongly tied to state and regional employment opportunities - through the link to demand data provided by the state's labor market information agency. In addition to existing demand, the Arkansas Economic Development Commission is consulted on a regular basis regarding emerging occupations and employment needs.

10. Methods for the joint planning and coordination of programs carried out under Perkins with other Federal education programs.

One of the strategies for local recipients at the secondary level for joint planning and coordinators (regardless of funding) is through the ACSIP plan - Arkansas Consolidated School Improvement Process. Each district is required to have a current ACSIP plan on file with the Department of Education each year. This plan outlines all school improvement strategies/activities along with the resources to accomplish the activities. At the state level, senior managers from the Department of Education and Department of Workforce Education meet and share information regularly. In addition, a joint meeting of the boards of Education, Workforce Education, and Higher Education meet annually on issues that span the K-16 system.

11. Procedures to ensure coordination and non-duplication among programs listed in sections 112(b)(8) and 121(c) of the Workforce Investment Act (Public Law 105-220) concerning the provision of services for postsecondary students and school dropouts

Both the directors of the Department of Workforce Education and the Department of Higher Education are members of the state's Workforce Investment Board. This membership ensures that the staff members of all three entities are aware of all activities being conducted for postsecondary students and school dropouts with regard to CTE.

III. PROVISION OF SERVICES FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS

1. Program strategies for special populations listed in Section 3(29) of the Act.

(a) Equal access for all students to activities assisted under the Act.

Equal access to vocational and technical education programs may be demonstrated in a number of ways:

* Program enrollment has approximately the same makeup as enrollment of the total student body.

* Entry requirements do not adversely affect access for members of special populations to the programs.

* Special population students are enrolled in all types of education programs, including occupational-specific courses, cooperative education, internships, and apprenticeships.

All students and their parents are provided with information about the opportunities in career and technical education prior to entry in the ninth grade. Approximately 55 percent of the students enrolled in one or more CTE courses each year are reported as a member of a special population category.

Equal access is a high priority at postsecondary institutions with 60 percent of Perkins concentrators having been designated as a member of one or more special population classifications. Special population participation ranges from 71 percent in the marketing career cluster to 8 percent in the transportation cluster. Ten clusters have special population participation above 50 percent and all but one exceeds 25 percent participation. Using Perkins and institutional funds, several colleges have funded first year experience and other special activities designed to increase recruitment, retention, and completion of special populations.

(b) Non-discrimination of students based on their status as members of special populations.

Postsecondary and secondary recipients comply with all state and federal nondiscrimination laws to ensure that special populations are afforded the same opportunities as other students. To assist with this, technical assistance and professional development activities will be provided by state staff and through leadership development activities in the area of nondiscrimination. Assurance of nondiscrimination will be required as part of the annual postsecondary application approval process and the secondary Office of Civil Rights visit.

(c) How programs are designed to enable the special populations to meet or exceed State adjusted levels of performance, and the preparation of special populations for further learning and for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations.

Students who are members of special populations must have access to and successfully participate in the state's CTE programs. To assure that such students have the opportunity to meet or exceed the state-adjusted levels of performance, it is critical that strategies and services are in place to achieve success.

Special populations are defined by the Act as

* Individuals with disabilities;

* Individuals from economically disadvantaged families, including foster children;

* Individuals preparing for nontraditional fields;

* Single parents, including single pregnant women;

* Displaced homemakers; and

* Individuals with limited English proficiency.

Strategies for assuring access to and success in career and technical education programs for special population students include the following:

* Promoting outreach and recruitment information regarding career opportunities with an emphasis on nontraditional opportunities;

* Identifying special population students;

* Utilizing assessment tools/individualized education plans for special population students enrolled in vocational and technical programs to determine their special needs;

* Planning and coordinating supplemental services for special population students enrolled in vocational and technical education programs;

* Facilitating the identification of appropriate adaptive equipment, assistive devices, and new technology for students with disabilities, as funding is available;

* Providing inservice activities for vocational and technical teachers, counselors, and administrators; and

* Identifying and/or developing special instructional materials or adapting existing instructional materials for vocational and technical programs.

Local plan guidelines require that eligible recipients specify the strategies and services available to meet the needs of the special populations in vocational and technical education programs. Eligible recipients will ensure that strategies and services for members of special populations in vocational and technical education programs are appropriate.

In addition to the strategies already identified above for all special population students, strategies to enable these particular students to prepare for further learning and for high-skill, high-wage careers may include the following:

* Exploration of career areas that focus on expanding career options, educational planning, and vocational training that is free of gender bias;

* Comprehensive career counseling and guidance, including labor market information, a broad range of occupations and alternative career paths, career testing, placement services for part-time and summer employment, internships, and cooperative programs;

* Access to options for specialization in a variety of areas with access to work-based learning opportunities;

* Career development activities that lead to mastery of career development competencies;

* High quality, paid work-based learning experiences to provide career exploration, enhancement of personal and interpersonal skills, and development of occupational skills;

* Access to programs that encourage learning all aspects of the industry, including planning, management, finances, technical production, and underlying principles of technology; and

* Provision of information on nontraditional jobs that offer higher pay and opportunities for advancement and benefits.

At the secondary level, these services may include supplementary services, guidance and counseling, and the vocational component of the transition plan for the special population students in vocational and technical education programs.

Two secondary courses have been developed specifically for special population students. Both courses focus on assisting students with barriers to graduate from high school. The Jobs for Arkansas' Graduates (JAG) course is a school-to-career program designed to keep young people in school through graduation and provide work-based learning experiences that will lead to career advancement opportunities or to the enrollment in a postsecondary institution that leads to a rewarding career.

The Students and Teachers Responsibly Integrating Vocational Education (STRIVE) course provides a versatile spectrum of instruction with the intent of integrating vocational and academic skills. This class offers a hands-on approach and utilizes various teaching strategies to address the students' variety of learning styles. Both courses emphasize individualized learning and competency attainment.

To ensure that all CTE teachers are equipped to work with special population students, a model pre-service training program was developed by one of the regional educational cooperatives. Information regarding this model will be provided to all districts. This pre-service training in effective teaching skills and practices is designed for all new CTE teachers. The program addresses the following issues: identifying special populations students; writing an Individualized Education Plan and legalities; teaching strategies to ensure success for special populations students; making modifications in the areas of curriculum, equipment, class environment, and instructional aids; effective practices in improving parental and community involvement (career action plans, advisory councils, and program marketing strategies). This pre-service training will be offered in each CTE content area as well as to attendees at the Arkansas Association of Career Technical Education Summer Conference.

Given that local Perkins recipients have varying needs, they will be encouraged to form consortia to address like special populations concerns.

At the postsecondary level, the Arkansas Career Pathways Initiative (CPI) is a new program offered by all Arkansas two-year colleges. The program provides free career training and college classes to students who qualify based on income and presence of children in the home. Services such as child care, transportation, career counseling, and job search assistance are provided. The goal is to prepare students for employment, including high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations and for continued education that will increase opportunities for employment in these sectors. Materials describing eligibility and benefits are provided to all postsecondary career counselors and faculty advisors to increase the number of special population students enrolled in higher education.

A comparison of CPI students and Perkins concentrators shows that 45 percent of CPI students are Perkins postsecondary concentrators. Because an analysis of CPI students also shows a high presence of the Perkins-defined special populations, Perkins state staff is collaborating with CPI to deliver services that address the needs of this group. For example, state staff participated in the development of a first year experience for students enrolled in the CPI program and is teaming with CPI to train local Perkins coordinators and other institutional staff on effective interventions for students from extreme poverty. State leadership funds will fund programs that analyze gaps in performance between special populations and all students and programs that encourage additional approaches and support programs for special and nontraditional populations.

2. How funds will be used to promote preparation for high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand occupations and non-traditional fields.

The development of the high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand list of pathways is described in the previous section. The development of the non-traditional list of pathways also was developed with involvement of the core team. National data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (found in the crosswalks on the National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity Web site) that identified occupations with fewer than 25 percent of either gender employed was used in addition to data from the state's Labor Market Information office. If a pathway was identified in either of the crosswalks as nontraditional, then that pathway will be considered as nontraditional for Perkins IV. Below is a listing of the pathways:

Nontraditional for Female

Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources

Agribusiness Systems

Animal Systems

Environmental Service Systems

Food Products and Processing Systems

Natural Resources

Plant Systems

Power, Structural and Technical Systems

Architecture and Construction

Construction

Design/Pre-Construction

Maintenance and Operations

Arts, A/V Technology and Communications

Journalism and Broadcasting

Printing Technology

Telecommunications

Business, Management and Administration Services

Management

Hospitality and Tourism

Restaurant & Food and Beverage Services

Information Technology

Information Support and Services

Network Systems

Programming/Software Engineering

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

Law Enforcement Services

Manufacturing

Maintenance, Installation & Repair

Manufacturing Production Process Development

Production

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Engineering and Technology

Science and Mathematics

Transportation, Distribution and Logistics

Facility and Mobile Equipment

Transportation Operations

Nontraditional for Male

Business, Management and Administration Services

Administration & Information Support

Business Financial Management and Accounting

Education and Training

Teaching & Training

Health Science

Health Informatics

Support Services

Therapeutic Services

Human Services

Early Childhood Development & Services

Personal Care Services

Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security

Legal Services

State leadership funds in an amount of $60,000 will be reserved and used to support teacher inservice training, recruitment efforts, curriculum development, and other services deemed effective in promoting participation in nontraditional training and employment. The department will develop a "tool kit" of resources, including information on high-skill, high-wage occupations, nontraditional careers, and classroom resources.

Several of the activities that were designed to introduce students at the junior high school level to nontraditional careers will continue. Project Learning Tree (PLT), designed to help junior high students in career orientation classes learn about forestry, strives to help young people achieve lives that are respectful of all living things including the environment. PLT creates opportunities for students to develop self-awareness. Using a problem-posing and problem-solving approach to instruction, PLT takes students beyond the fear of diversity and difference. Within this process, they are encouraged to examine issues, identify what they believe to be bad choices, and share ideas about how these choices can be changed. PLT also incorporates hands-on activities that dispel stereotypical images of forestry as a male-dominated profession in which success is dependent upon the physical strength and the ability to brave storms, fires, and other natural disasters. PLT curriculum and applied activities clearly confirm that the job duties and responsibilities of a forester can be easily performed by either gender.

The Real Game, an activity designed to work across the curriculum, adds relevance to and incorporates such subject and skill areas as math, language arts, family life studies, social studies, decision making, communication, group work, analysis, self-awareness, and critical thinking. By using play-acting, written exercises, research projects, structured game activities, and interaction with classmates, teachers, parents, and community members, The Real Game provides a positive and supportive venue for young people to explore the emerging world of work. By learning how to cope with change while exploring the future in a realistic but non-threatening way, students who participate in The Real Game develop a positive attitude about their roles within the new dynamic of the world of work. Through random student/occupation match-ups, the game allows students to investigate the nature of careers they might otherwise never consider. These random match-ups also teach the value of all work and that any occupation is appropriate if it suits personal goals and individual personalities. This is particularly important for students since it can expose them to nontraditional career possibilities. The Real Game is another activity used primarily in the junior high course of career orientation.

At the postsecondary level, state leadership funds will be used to support pilot projects related to nontraditional student participation and success. Funds also will be used to provide appropriate professional development opportunities for postsecondary faculty and support staff. Nontraditional issues will be included in technical assistance meetings, and reference material on the Web site will be increased to include best practices and additional resources. A preference for nontraditional support activities will be given during the basic grant application process when nontraditional performance measures are deficient.

8. How the needs of students in alternative education programs will be adequately addressed.

Most students in alternative education environments are enrolled in regular CTE programs. Therefore, the needs of these students do not need to be addressed separately.

9. How funds will be used to serve individuals in State correctional institutions.

The state will reserve up to 1 percent of the basic state grant under Section 122(a)(2)(A) from state leadership funds to serve individuals in state correctional institutions or in state institutions that serve people with disabilities. Eligible institutions must submit an application for funding, outlined below, no later than July 15 each year. Application approval and the level of funding will be determined upon review to ensure that the activities described in the application are of size, scope, and quality to be effective and are eligible activities for Perkins funding.

The application for funding is in the same format as the Local Application for Secondary Perkins Recipients (found in Attachment 1).

10. How each applicant is required to include in its application a description of the steps the applicant proposes to take to ensure equitable access to, and participation in, its federally-assisted program for students, teachers, and other program beneficiaries with special needs as contained in section 427(b) of the General Education Provisions Act as amended

The five-year local plan that must be completed by all eligible recipients requires a description of how students who are members of special populations will be served and will be afforded equitable access to and participation in CTE programs. This description must include how the eligible recipient will assure that special population students will be assisted to achieve the same academic and CTE standards as all other students.

Eligible recipients must also certify that their programs and professional development programs provided with Perkins funds are available upon written request to students and teachers from private schools.

IV. ACCOUNTABILITY AND EVALUATION

Student Definitions

Secondary Level

Parti cipants - Students who enroll in one unit of credit in CTE.

Concentrators - Students who enroll in a minimum of three units of credit, including the core required courses, in a CTE program of study.

Postsecondary/Adult Level

Participants - Students who have declared intent, enrolled in a CTE program area, and earned a minimum of 3 semester credit hours.

Concentrators - Students who have declared intent, enrolled in a CTE program of study, and have completed the following thresholds: 6 semester credit hours for a certificate of proficiency; 12 semester credit hours for a technical certificate; 30 semester credit hours for an associate level degree; and the equivalent of 25 semester credit hours for students enrolled in a technical institute. The semester credit hours can include both academic and technical coursework required by the program.

1. The procedures used to obtain input from eligible recipients in establishing measurement definitions and approaches for the core indicators of performance for career and technical education students at the secondary and postsecondary levels.

Both agencies responsible for oversight of the Perkins funds have worked with the local coordinators on the measurement definitions and methods of determining performance.

At the secondary level, the Department of Workforce Education had a series of meetings with a core team of consortia and single LEA representatives along with staff members. The discussions at the meetings included at least one, and usually several, of the indicators and the measurement of performance. After the first few meetings, the staff took the recommendations and began running the data available, using the parameters and definitions to determine the impact of the recommendations on performance levels. For most of the indicators, prior year data could be adjusted to provide estimates of performance. This feedback was provided to the core team members and was shared with all recipients. Through this collaborative effort, the measurement definitions and approaches were agreed upon.

At the postsecondary level, meetings have been held with chief academic officers, local coordinators, and other institutional staff who have an interest in Perkins programs. These discussions were supported by analysis of the past three years' performance results (at the state and local levels) to determine reasonable indicators and benchmarks.

Institutions have expressed support for use of the higher education accountability system to replace separate reporting for Perkins. As a result, all postsecondary performance measures will be reported with information from the state's data system instead of relying on annual reports from institutions.

2. The procedures used to obtain input from eligible recipients in establishing a State adjusted level of performance for each of the core indicators of performance for career and technical education students at the secondary and postsecondary levels.

Secondary - The core team has discussed the academic and graduation indicators at length at multiple meetings prior to submitting the transition plan; however, the state-adjusted level of performance for these indicators will be the same as are used for NCLB.

Preliminary discussion of the performance levels for the remaining indicators began with the core team in the fall of 2006. Since the definitions of the student populations to be measured are very comparable to those under Perkins III, the state has several years of performance data that was used by the core team to assist in determining the state-adjusted level of performance for the remaining indicators. These proposed numerators and denominators and the methodology were presented during the review of the state plan.

Postsecondary - Performance levels have been discussed with coordinators, chief academic officers, and institutional research staff of recipient institutions. Baseline data will be established using an average of the three most recent program years and used to determine postsecondary performance targets.

3. The valid and reliable measurement definitions and approaches that will be used for each of the core indicators of performance for career and technical education students at the secondary and postsecondary/adult levels.

Secondary

Academic Attainment - Literacy

Approach: The NCLB assessment and NCLB annual measurable objective

Numerator: CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system in the reporting year who score proficient or advanced on the literacy assessment

Denominator: All CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system in the reporting year with an assessment score

Academic Attainment - Math

Approach: The NCLB assessment and NCLB annual measurable objective

Numerator: CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system in the reporting year who score proficient or advanced on the geometry assessment

Denominator: All CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system in the reporting year with an assessment score

Graduation

Approach: The graduation of students according to the NCLB workbook

Numerator: CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system in the reporting year who are reported as graduated for NCLB

Denominator: All CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system in the reporting year

Completion

Approach: Graduation plus CTE concentrators who receive a GED diploma.

Numerator: CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system during the reporting year who are reported as graduated or who receive a GED diploma

Denominator: All CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system in the reporting year

CTE Skill

Approach: End-of-course state-developed, industry-validated assessments based on state-approved frameworks

Numerator: CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system during the reporting year who have an average score of proficient on all skill assessments taken in grades 9-12

Denominator: All CTE concentrators leaving the secondary system during the reporting year who have a score on a skill assessment in grades 9-12

Placement

Approach: State-developed, locally-administered survey conducted six months after graduation

Numerator: CTE concentrators who complete a program of study and graduate during the reporting year and who are employed, in the military, or in further education six months after graduation

Denominator: All CTE concentrators who complete a program of study and graduate during the reporting year and who are found during the survey period

Nontraditional Participation

Approach: State administrative records of enrollment in at least one unit in programs determined to be nontraditional for either gender

Numerator: Students enrolled in a minimum of one unit in a program of study determined to be nontraditional for their gender

Denominator: All students enrolled in a minimum of one unit in a program of study determined to be nontraditional for either gender

Nontraditional Completion

Approach: State administrative graduation records of CTE concentrators who complete all requirements for a program determined to be nontraditional

Numerator: CTE concentrators who graduate and who complete the requirements for a program of study that is nontraditional for their gender

Denominator: All CTE concentrators who graduate and who complete the requirements for a program of study that is nontraditional for either gender

Postsecondary - Performance levels have been discussed with coordinators, chief academic officers, and institutional research staff of recipient institutions. Baseline data will be averaged from the three most recent program years and used to determine postsecondary performance targets.

4. How the indicators are aligned so that information substantially similar to that gathered for other State and Federal programs, or for any other purpose, is used to meet the Act's accountability requirements.

The secondary indicators for academic and graduation will be aligned to the extent possible with the assessments and methodology used for determining AYP for NCLB. The same academic assessments will be used. However, due to the requirement to report on CTE students at the time they leave the secondary system, the timing of the measurement will not be aligned to the state's NCLB goals on a year-to-year basis. AYP is measured each year for the students assessed that year. For example, the state's literacy assessment, given to all 11th graders during the spring of 2007, will be used to determine the schools' 2007 AYP score. However, CTE will not report those scores until the 11th graders who are CTE concentrators leave the system - in the spring of 2008. Therefore, the Perkins literacy goal for 2007-08 will actually be the state's NCLB goal for 2006-07.

Postsecondary information will be compiled using data submitted to AHESIS, which was designed for use across multiple state and federal programs.

5. Description of the process for reaching agreement on local adjusted levels of performance if an eligible recipient does not accept the State adjusted levels of performance under section 113(b)(3) of the Act.

Secondary - The department has implemented a Web program for negotiating local-adjusted levels of performance with all eligible recipients. The negotiation model adopted requires the state to determine the anticipated performance goals for 2012-13 - the final year of the Perkins IV authorization. If a recipient is already performing above the state goal, acceptance of the state goal is not sufficient. Continuous improvement dictates that even high-performing recipients must continue to improve.

For recipients performing below the state goal, the negotiation model requires each recipient to request a level of improvement that will allow it to reach the state goal by the year 2012-13. It is expected that all recipients will meet or exceed the state's performance goals by 2012-13 - the sixth year of the Act.

The local-adjusted levels of performance will be renegotiated each two years during the life of the Perkins Act, and future negotiations of increases required will be based on actual performance in the three previous years available. However, regardless of actual performance of any recipient, the state's expectation is that all recipients will meet or exceed the state's performance goals by the sixth year of Perkins IV.

Postsecondary - The approach for postsecondary mirrors that of secondary.

6. The objective criteria and methods that will be used to allow an eligible recipient to request revisions to its local adjusted levels of performance if unanticipated circumstances arise with respect to an eligible recipient.

For both secondary and postsecondary recipients, the criteria to allow a recipient to request a revision include the consolidation of districts or merger of institutions; a documented shortfall in revenue to support ongoing career and technical education programs; a disaster such as fire or tornado that destroys a portion of the campus, thereby closing CTE programs; or the opening or closing of CTE programs that negatively impact the students' performance on the indicators. It is the recipient's responsibility to provide the data to show that the event actually caused a drop in performance that requires a revision. A recipient may request a revision of the local-adjusted level of performance during the open period of the annual Perkins application each spring. This time period is generally early May through June 30. No adjustments will be made after June 30 for the following year. DWE's CTE deputy director is the final appeal regarding a revision for secondary recipients. The final appeal for postsecondary recipients is ADHE's deputy director.

In addition to the above criteria for allowing a revision due to unexpected circumstances for single recipients, a consortium also may request a revision if a recipient not previously in a consortium receives a grant of less than $15,000 for secondary or $50,000 for postsecondary and is required to become a member of the consortium. If the new member's performance levels negatively impact the consortium's negotiated levels, a revision may be allowed.

After the 2008-09 fiscal year, consortium membership will remain unchanged throughout the lifecycle of Perkins IV with the following exceptions:

(1) If a recipient's grant falls below the minimum required to remain outside a consortium, then the recipient will be allowed to join a consortium.

(2) If a recipient with a grant that is above the minimum desires to join a consortium, the recipient and the consortium must agree and must prove through written documentation that the recipient's performance will not negatively impact the performance of the consortium.

(3) If a consortium member receives a grant above the minimum and desires to move out of the consortium, the district/institution must prove through written documentation that this move will not negatively impact the consortium performance. If a district/institution moves in or out of a consortium for any reason other than #1, only one such move will be allowed during the lifecycle of Perkins IV.

7. How data will be reported relating to students participating in career and technical education programs in order to adequately measure the progress of the students, including special populations and students participating in tech prep programs, if applicable, and how the state will ensure that the data reported from local educational agencies and eligible institutions, and the data that is reported to the Secretary, are complete, accurate, and reliable.

As required by the Act, local recipients must report performance results to the public in a variety of methods including electronically. However, all reports of performance should follow guidelines that protect individual student identity.

Secondary

Student data at the secondary level is taken primarily from state administrative records. All public schools participate in a statewide computer network (APSCN) that includes unique student identifiers linked to enrollment in courses and demographic information. This student data also is used by the Department of Education (general K-12 education) for determining district funding. Therefore, the accuracy is very high. Since all districts use the system and must use the standard course codes that are programmed into the system, DWE can determine the CTE course enrollments and subsequently the CTE investors. Records from APSCN also are used to determine graduation rates and nontraditional participation. The academic assessment scores are drawn directly from the public school data warehouse.

The APSCN system allows the department to capture all the special population categories for students. This will be used for disaggregation into all the required categories in the Act. Since the department is able to use state administrative records for a majority of the performance data, the data will be reported back to local recipients in order for them to meet the requirement of sharing performance data with the public.

The CTE skill assessment scores are taken directly from the web-based testing system operated by the department. The CTE skill assessments are being monitored for reliability using Cronbach's Alpha system. This is a measure of the consistency of the results across all the questions within an assessment. One identified weakness in the secondary CTE skill assessment is the testing security - local districts may allow their CTE teachers to administer the end-of-course assessments to their own classes of students. Although administrators and teachers are provided with test administration instructions, isolated incidents of testing irregularities have been reported. To improve the CTE skill assessment experience for students and to ensure that all students are provided with the appropriate and equal administration of the tests, DWE staff began on-site random interviewing of students and teachers at local high schools in the fall of 2007.

The only performance information each local recipient must report is the students who successfully complete a program of study with the required knowledge and skills and their placement status six months after graduation. The placement data reported by each recipient has been tested for accuracy. The department has done data studies with the Department of Higher Education that verify that the information the local recipients report on the students entering postsecondary education is accurate. And the number of students reported as unemployed tracks very closely with the state's unemployment rate each year.

Postsecondary

The Department of Higher Education has a commitment to quality data and has developed the Arkansas Higher Education Student Information System to provide a strong accountability system. AHESIS is managed by the ADHE Office of Accountability, which collects and analyzes information required to meet state or federal requirements. AHESIS is one of the largest databases in the state and includes enrollment, retention and graduation rates, and demographic information on every student enrolled in public postsecondary institutions. The student data for Perkins postsecondary reporting is taken from AHESIS administrative records and the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services (DWS). Postsecondary concentrators,

technical skill attainment, credential attainment, student retention, and nontraditional participation and completion will be reported using data from this system. Placement performance will be reported from DWS.

8. How the State plans to enter into an agreement with each consortium receiving a grant under Perkins IV to meet a minimum level of performance for each of the performance indicators described in section 113(b) and 203(e) of the Act.

The fiscal agent for each secondary and postsecondary consortium will be responsible for negotiating the local levels of performance for the consortium. The data for each district within the consortium will be aggregated, and the consortium will be treated as a single recipient. If the consortium fails to meet the adjusted performance level on an indicator, all districts within the consortium are considered to have failed. The method for reaching agreement on local levels of performance with consortia is the same as with single recipients.

9. How the state will annually evaluate the effectiveness of career and technical education programs, and how the state, to the extent practicable, will coordinate those programs with other Federal programs to ensure non-duplication.

At the secondary level, the evaluation of the career and technical education system in the state is much more inclusive than the performance factors specified by the Perkins Act. Other factors include operation of an active career and technical student organization, teacher attendance at various professional development sessions, course sequencing, and instructional equipment. With more than 2,500 teachers in 522 high schools and junior high and middle schools, the department relies on a variety of methods for evaluating programs.

Each year, every secondary CTE teacher must submit a teaching schedule and contact information so the staff can determine if an approved program of study or sequence of courses is being offered. The department also contracts with the 15 educational cooperatives across the state to provide a career and technical education coordinator who assists teachers and administrators on a regional basis. This coordinator is especially helpful to the many small districts that cannot afford a local CTE director.

For Perkins funding, however, the effectiveness of the CTE programs also must be evaluated based on the performance indicators. Failure on the performance indicators leads into the process of improvement plans and sanctions that will be used by the state.

Factors that will be considered before recommending sanctions include, but are not limited to, the following:

* Was any progress made toward meeting the target, even if the 90 percent level was not attained?

* Is the recipient failing on multiple indicators?

* Did the recipient obtain technical assistance on the indicator(s) in question from recognized credible sources?

* If the recipient is a consortium, were efforts of improvement directed toward the member(s) that caused the failure?

* Were Perkins funds directed toward improvement on the failing indicator(s)?

Secondary Improvement Plans

Below is the description of how the state intends to use improvement plans and sanctions for improving and evaluating the effectiveness of Perkins funds.

After a recipient is identified as failing to meet an adjusted level of performance, the recipient must file an improvement plan that addresses each indicator in which 90 percent of the target was not achieved. The Act requires that the state monitor and provide technical assistance regarding performance and further specifies that the state may redirect all or a portion of a local recipient's funds to provide services to students through alternative arrangements if the recipient fails to implement an improvement plan or fails for three consecutive years on the same indicator. SBWECO will be notified of all districts and postsecondary institutions entering into an improvement plan each year.

First year of improvement plan: State staff will monitor implementation of the plan and provide technical assistance as requested.

Second year of improvement plan: State staff will monitor on-site to determine if the improvement plan has been fully implemented. Failure to implement the improvement plan may result in the staff's recommendation to the State Board to redirect all or a portion of the recipient's funds to provide services through an educational cooperative, through another recipient who is successfully meeting its performance targets, or through an alternate appropriate provider with expertise in the area in which the recipient is failing.

Third year of improvement plan: During the third year of an improvement plan, the state will continue to provide technical assistance and monitor the recipient for improvements. If the recipient has implemented its improvement plan but still fails to meet 90 percent of the adjusted performance level for the same indicator after the third year, the State Board may redirect a portion or all of the recipient's funds and provide services to the recipient's CTE students and programs through alternative arrangements. These alternative providers include a postsecondary institution, a school district, an educational cooperative, a state agency, or another alternative provider with expertise in the area in which the recipient is failing.

Due to the timing of availability of data, January of the year following the actual performance is the earliest date recipients will be notified of failure on any indicator.

Postsecondary Improvement Plans

The following guidelines for improvement plans will be used to develop an improvement plan for each indicator with deficient results. In summary,

IP Year 1: State staff will monitor implementation of the plan and provide technical assistance as requested.

IP Year 2: State staff will continue to monitor and provide technical assistance and may also prescribe uses of funds.

IP Year 3: State staff will continue to provide technical assistance and monitor the recipient for improvements. Staff may recommend that a portion or all of the recipient's funds be directed to an alternate provider.

Recommendations for sanctions will be made by state staff to the ADHE deputy director who will inform the chief academic officer of the affected institution.

Program Year 1:

Institution fails to achieve 90 percent of an indicator and is notified by the state that an improvement plan must be implemented during Program Year 2 (2009-10).

Program Year 2/Improvement Plan Year 1:

State staff will work with local coordinators to have an improvement plan approved for implementation during the following program year. State staff will monitor progress and provide technical assistance as needed.

Program Year 3/Improvement Plan Year 2:

State staff will review performance results from Improvement Plan Year 1 to determine level of improvement. If performance has not improved over Program Year 2 results, staff may prescribe how local funds must be used.

Program Year 4/Improvement Plan Year 3:

If results from Program Year 3 show no positive improvement, state staff may recommend that some or all of the basic grant funds be redirected to an alternate provider with the capacity and expertise to provide services to the failing institution's CTE students.

10. The program areas for which the state has technical skill assessments, the estimated percentage of CTE students who take technical skill assessments, and the plan for increasing the coverage of programs and students reported in future program years.

Secondary

During the 2006-07 school year, approximately 75% of all CTE concentrators were represented in the technical skill performance indicator with at least one assessment score. Since technical skill attainment is based on end-of-course assessments, each concentrator will have multiple assessment scores throughout their program of study. An average of all scores is used for the technical skill performance indicator. At the current time, there are 146 core courses within all programs of study. The core courses are those that all students who are concentrators must take. During 2006-07, 30 of the core courses were tested (20%). The state plans to develop additional assessments so that by 2009, 25% of the core courses will be assessed; by 2010, 50%; by 2011, 75%; and by 2012, 100%. As the assessments are developed, the core courses that the most students take will be considered first - therefore, the percentage of concentrators with assessments will always be much higher than the percentage of core courses assessed. As noted, even though only 20% of the core courses were assessed in 2007, almost 75% of the concentrators were represented in those course assessments.

Postsecondary

There are 164 different programs of study in 42 different pathways offered at the postsecondary level and there is no statewide assessment for CTE programs at this time. Currently the technical skill attainment of postsecondary CTE students is based upon GPA attained in CTE coursework. In addition to GPA, some programs administer certification or licensure tests but there is great variance in this approach. This variance occurs because not all programs have such testing, testing is voluntary and paid for by the student, or the student takes the test after having exited the college with performance results unknown to the institution.

At the direction of the Governor, Arkansas has adopted the WorkKeys assessment as its measure for workforce readiness and is implementing several initiatives related to the use of this system. For example, the Arkansas Economic Development Commission and the Arkansas Department of Workforce Services have begun issuing workforce readiness certificates at the bronze, silver and gold levels based upon WorkKeys assessment results. Importantly, the state is also currently determining whether a combination of KeyTrain instruction and WorkKeys assessment is more effective at reducing college remediation rates than traditional developmental education. Because of the desire for an integrated approach, ADHE will use the WorkKeys assessment as its measure for technical skill attainment beginning with program year 2011-2012. In the interim, overall GPA will be used to measure technical skill attainment.

V. TECH PREP

The state will continue to consolidate all of the Tech Prep funds into the basic grant.

VI. FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS

1. How funds under section 111 of the Act and under section 202(2) of the Act will be allocated among career and technical education at the secondary level the postsecondary and adult level and the rationale for such allocation.

Arkansas has chosen to consolidate the entire tech prep grant into the basic grant.

The split of the local funds between secondary and postsecondary has historically been based on student enrollment in programs. From 1991 until about 1994, the split fluctuated according to actual student count each year. In 1994-95, the State Board set the split at 75 percent secondary and 25 percent postsecondary to allow for a more stable funding stream for both groups. This rationale will continue through Perkins IV.

The secondary allocation formula uses the student membership data collected by the National Center for Education Statistics through the Common Core of Data survey system for distributing 30 percent of the funds. The remaining 70 percent of the funds are distributed on the number of individuals ages 5-17 who reside in the district and are from families below the poverty level.

The postsecondary allocation formula uses the number of Perkins concentrators who are Pell grant recipients or recipients of assistance from the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Up to 10 percent of the local secondary funds may be reserved each year. Recipients with high percentages of CTE students will be eligible to respond to a RFP. A high percentage of CTE students will be defined as enrollment in one or more CTE course by 50 percent or more of the students in grades nine through12 within the district each year; however, a district within 3 points of this definition may request individual state review due to extenuating circumstances. The RFP review committee for any of the various grants may include the Arkansas Department of Economic Development, the Department of Workforce Services, the Department of Higher Education, and DWE.

In 2007-08, these funds were used for grants to eligible recipients for the purpose of developing and implementing new programs of study in high-wage, high-demand, and high-skill pathways in which there are no existing programs at the secondary level or for existing programs in these pathways. These grants were awarded on a competitive basis through response to a Request for Proposal (RFP). The priority for grants was for the development of programs of study in high-skill, high-wage, high-demand pathways that currently have no approved programs in the state. Priority was given to those respondents that identified a postsecondary partner in the development process.

The secondary reserve funds may also be used as incentive grants in connection with performance on one or more indicators, for math or literacy initiatives in CTE, aligning CTE frameworks with academic standards, automotive technology programs, a summer bridge program, or other initiatives that enhance the state's priorities.

Postsecondary did not reserve funds during the transition year but may elect to do so in the future. If used, reserve funds will fund model projects that support statewide Perkins goals and will be awarded through a competitive RFP process. Program areas such as secondary-to-postsecondary curriculum alignment or statewide will be identified. RFPs will be solicited and funds awarded for projects to be implemented during the current program year. Program evaluation, recommendations for replication, and willingness to provide technical assistance to institutions choosing to replicate the project will be required of recipients.

2. How allocations are distributed to local educational agencies, area career and technical education schools, and educational service agencies within the State.

All secondary local funds are distributed only to public school districts (local educational agencies). Area career and technical education schools (secondary centers) in the state may participate in Perkins projects and activities through the public school districts that send students to their programs. Students generally attend secondary centers for two to three hours each day to participate in CTE classes. Core academic courses are not offered at the secondary centers. Educational service agencies do not operate schools - but 14 of the 15 agencies do operate as the fiscal agent of a Perkins consortium. However, the only funds allocated to the agencies are the basic grant funds assigned to them by the consortium members.

Postsecondary funds are distributed to state-supported institutions of higher education.

3. Allocation of funds among any consortia that will be formed among secondary schools and eligible institutions, and how funds will be allocated among the members of the consortia, including the rationale for such allocation.

Funds allocated to any member of a consortium will be allocated to the consortium's fiscal agent by the Department of Workforce Education. Each consortium operates under the guidance of the consortium board, which is composed of a representative of each of the member schools or institutions. The consortium board operates projects for the benefit of all consortium members. The consortium fiscal agent does not assign back the funds allocated to each member by the distribution formula. A copy of the allocation of funds for 2008-09 is attached.

4. Description of adjustment in the data used to make the allocations to reflect any change in school district boundaries that may have occurred since the population and/or enrollment data was collected, and include local educational agencies without geographical boundaries, such as charter schools and secondary schools funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

At the current time, no charter schools are receiving Perkins funds, and no secondary schools in the state are funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The charter schools are primarily elementary or middle school level, and the few that operate high school courses are focused on academic courses and do not offer CTE programs of study. If any charter school requests funding, the same methodology as is used to determine funding by the Arkansas Department of Education for other federal funds will be used for Perkins funding allocation.

School district boundaries have changed a great deal in the past four years. The state has gone from 309 public school districts to 245 due to legislation requiring consolidation for small districts. As districts were annexed or consolidated, the data used for funding allocations also was consolidated for a single grant to the new or consolidated district.

5. Description of any proposed alternative allocation formula(s) requiring approval by the Secretary as described in section 131(b) or 132(b) of the Act.

No alternatives allocation formulas are requested.

6. Description of procedure used to determine eligible recipients in rural and sparsely populated areas that would allow them to request exception to the minimum grants requirements for becoming a member of a consortium.

Requests must be made in writing to the finance director of DWE and must include the following:

The local education agency must document that it is

(1) located in a rural, sparsely populated area, or

(2) a public charter school operating secondary career and technical education programs, and

(3) unable to enter into a consortium for purposes of providing activities under this Act.

The waiver request must be submitted prior to the beginning of the fiscal year under consideration. DWE will respond within 10 working days of the receipt of the request.

No postsecondary institutions are located outside one of the urban areas or clusters.

PERKINS IV BUDGET TABLE - PROGRAM YEAR 2 (For Federal Funds to Become Available Beginning on July 1, 2008)

TITLE I: CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATE

A. Total Title I allocation to the State

$12,068,187

B. Amount of Title II Tech Prep funds to be consolidated with Title I funds

$ 1,186,046

C. Total amount of combined Title I and Title II funds to be distributed under Section 122

$13,254,233

D. Local formula distribution (85%)

$11,266,098

1. Reserve

  

a. Secondary Programs

$ 600,000

b. Postsecondary Programs

N/A

2. Available for formula allocations

  

a. Secondary

$ 7,849,573

b. Postsecondary

$ 2,816,525

E. State leadership (10%)

$ 1,325,423

1. Nontraditional Training and Employment

60,000

2. Institutions or Corrections

132,542

F. State Administration (5%)

$ 662,712

G. State Match (from non-federal funds)

($1,000,000)

TITLE II: TECH PREP PROGRAMS

  

A. Total Title II allocation to the State

$ 1,186,046

B. Amount of Title II Tech Prep funds to be consolidated with Title I funds

$ 1,186,046

C. Amount of Title II funds to be made available for Tech Prep

N/A

D. Tech-Prep funds earmarked for consortia

N/A

1. Percent for consortia

2. Number of consortia

N/A

N/A

3. Method of distribution:

N/A

____ Formula

  

____ Competitive

  

E. Tech Prep administration

N/A

1. Percent for Administration (0%)

N/A

VII. CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES

In accordance with 34 CFR 76.104 of the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR), the State Board of Workforce Education and Career Opportunities through the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education assures that:

1. The transition plan is submitted by the state agency that is eligible to submit the plan.

2. The State Board of Workforce Education and Career Opportunities has authority under state law to perform the functions of the state under the program.

3. The state legally may carry out each provision of the plan.

4. All provisions of the plan are consistent with state law.

5. The director of the Department of Workforce Education has authority under state law to receive, hold, and disburse federal funds made available under this plan.

6. The director of the Department of Workforce Education has authority to submit the plan.

7. The State Board of Workforce Education and Career Opportunities formally approved the plan for state operation and administration of the program.

8. A copy of the state plan has been submitted into the State Intergovernmental Review Process.

9. The state will comply with the requirements of the Act and the provisions of the state plan, including the provision of a financial audit of funds received under the Act, which may be included as part of an audit of other federal or state programs.

10. None of the funds expended under the Act will be used to acquire equipment (including computer software) in any instance in which such acquisition results in a direct financial benefit to any organization representing the interest of the acquiring entity, the employees of the acquiring entity, or any affiliate of such an organization.

11. The state will waive the minimum allocation as required in Section 131(c)(1) in any case in which the local educational agency is located in a rural, sparsely populated area or is a public charter school operating secondary school career and technical education programs and demonstrates that it is unable to enter into a consortium for purposes of providing services under the Act.

12. The state will provide, from non-federal sources, for the costs the eligible agency incurs for the administration of programs under this Act, an amount that is not less than the amount provided by the eligible agency from non-federal sources for such costs for the preceding fiscal year.

13. The state and eligible recipients that use funds under this Act for inservice and pre-service career and technical education professional development programs for career and technical education teachers, administrators, and other personnel shall, to the extent practicable, upon written request, permit the participation in such programs of career and technical education secondary school teachers, administrators, and other personnel in nonprofit private schools offering career and technical secondary education programs located in the geographical area served by such eligible agency or eligible recipient.

14. Except as prohibited by state or local law, an eligible recipient may, upon written request, use funds made available under this Act to provide for the meaningful participation, in career and technical education programs and activities receiving funds under this Act, of secondary school students attending nonprofit private schools who reside in the geographical area served by the eligible recipient.

15. Eligible recipients that receive an allotment under this Act will consult, upon written request, in a timely and meaningful manner with representatives of nonprofit private schools in the geographical area served by the eligible recipient regarding the meaningful participation, in career and technical education programs and activities receiving funding under this Act, of secondary school students attending nonprofit private schools.

16. Funds received under the Act will not be used to provide career and technical education programs to students prior to the seventh grade, except that equipment and facilities purchased with funds under this Act may be used by such students.

17. No funds made available under the Act will be used to require any secondary school student to choose or pursue a specific career path or major.

18. No funds made available under the Act will be used to mandate that any individual participate in a career and technical education program, including a career and technical education program that requires the attainment of a federally funded skill level, standard, or certificate of mastery.

19. Funds made available under the Act for career and technical education activities will supplement, and not supplant, non-federal funds expended to carry out career and technical education activities.

20. No funds provided under the Act will be used for the purpose of directly providing incentives or inducements to an employer to relocate a business enterprise from one state to another state if such relocation will result in a reduction in the number of jobs available in the state where the business enterprise is located before such incentives or inducements are offered.

21. The state will meet the maintenance of fiscal effort requirements.

22. All funds made available under the Act will be used in accordance with the Act.

23. Funds made available under the Act may be used to pay for the costs of career and technical education services required in an individualized education program developed pursuant to Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and services necessary to the requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 with respect to ensuring equal access to career and technical education.

24. The state will use the Excluded Parties List System to ensure that none of the principals of covered transactions are excluded or disqualified from participating in the transaction.

Attachment 1 - Local Five-Year Plan (Secondary and Postsecondary)

CONTENTS OF THE LOCAL FIVE-YEAR PLAN (not format)

* Describe how the career and technical education programs required under section 135(b) will be carried out with funds received under this title;

* Describe how the career and technical education activities will be carried out with respect to meeting State and local adjusted levels of performance for the following indicators:

* Academic attainment - Literacy and Math

* Graduation

* CTE skill attainment

* Placement

* Parti cipation in nontraditional programs

* Completion of nontraditional programs

* Describe how the eligible recipient will--

* offer the appropriate courses of not less than 1 of the career and technical programs of study described in section 122(c)(1)(A);

* improve the academic and technical skills of students participating in career and technical education programs by strengthening the academic and career and technical education components of such programs through the integration of coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant career and technical education programs to ensure learning in--

* the core academic subjects (as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965); and

* career and technical education subjects;

* provide students with strong experience in, and understanding of, all aspects of an industry;

* ensure that students who participate in such career and technical education programs are taught to the same coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards as are taught to all other students; and

* encourage career and technical education students at the secondary level to enroll in rigorous and challenging courses in core academic subjects (as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965);

* Describe how individuals who are members of special populations will not be discriminated against on the basis of their status as members of the special populations;

* Describe how performance data (disaggregated by the categories required in the Act) will be made available to the public through a variety of formats, including electronically through the Internet.

* Provide assurances that the eligible recipient will provide a career and technical education program that is of such size, scope, and quality to bring about improvement in the quality of career and technical education programs;

* Describe how career guidance and academic counseling will be provided to career and technical education students, including linkages to future education and training opportunities;

* Describe how comprehensive professional development (including initial teacher preparation) for career and technical education, academic, guidance, and administrative personnel will be provided that promotes the integration of coherent and rigorous content aligned with challenging academic standards and relevant career and technical education (including curriculum development);

* Describe how parents, students, academic and career and technical education teachers, faculty, administrators, career guidance and academic counselors, representatives of tech prep consortia (if applicable), representatives of the entities participating in activities described in section 117 of Public Law 105-220 (if applicable), representatives of business (including small business) and industry, labor organizations, representatives of special populations, and other interested individuals are involved in the development, implementation, and evaluation of career and technical education programs assisted under this title, and how such individuals and entities are effectively informed about, and assisted in understanding, the requirements of this title, including career and technical programs of study;

* Describe the process that will be used to evaluate and continuously improve the performance of the eligible recipient;

* Describe how the eligible recipient will--

* review career and technical education programs, and identify and adopt strategies to overcome barriers that result in lowering rates of access to or lowering success in the programs, for special populations;

* provide programs that are designed to enable the special populations to meet the local adjusted levels of performance; and

* provide activities to prepare special populations, including single parents and displaced homemakers, for high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations that will lead to self-sufficiency;

* Describe how funds will be used to promote preparation for non-traditional fields;

* Describe efforts to improve--

* the recruitment and retention of career and technical education teachers, faculty, and career guidance and academic counselors, including individuals in groups underrepresented in the teaching profession; and

* the transition to teaching from business and industry.

* SECONDARY RECIPIENTS ONLY - Describe how students attending secondary career and technical centers as well as the CTE programs attended at the centers will be supported.

Attachment 2 - Secondary Local Application

COVER PAGE

* Name of District/Consortium

* Administrator Name

* Address

* Perkins Coordinator

* Phone

BUDGET SUMMARY FORM (MUST DESCRIBE USE OF ANY ADMINISTRATIVE FUNDS)

ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT FOR PREVIOUS YEAR

* Name of Project

* Description

* Measurement

* Did you meet your measurement objective? What were the outcomes?

IMPROVEMENT PLAN

If your district/consortium did not meet or exceed the local adjusted levels of performance on the most recent status report available, you must specifically state what strategies will be undertaken to ensure improvement.

ACROSS-ALL-PROGRAMS PROJECT

* Name of Project:

* Description - what are you going to do.

* How are you going to do this - describe the major activities to be conducted during the current program year.

* On which performance indicator will this project have the major impact (check only one that is the primary focus of this activity/project):

* Academic attainment

* CTE skill attainment or completion of program of study

* Graduation from high school or attainment of GED

* Placement in postsecondary, the military, or employment

* Parti cipation or completion of nontraditional programs

* Identify which of the required uses or permissive uses of funds this project meets.

* How will the success of this project be measured? What data will you review to determine achievement on the performance indicator selected to improve? What set of students will you measure?

* School(s) in which this project will be conducted:

* Approximate number of teachers/counselors/administrators who will be involved:

* Is this the first time this project has been conducted under Perkins IV: [] Yes [] No

* Please describe the outcomes (positive or negative) from previous year that affected your decision to continue or repeat this activity as well as any modifications being made to ensure success:

* Describe the financial costs for this project that will be paid from the Perkins funds during the current year.

* Salary/benefits/stipends

* Professional development expenses (including travel)

* Consultant costs

* Instructional materials/supplies

* Software

* Other

* Equipment and other non-consumable items that cost more than $200: (list item, school, and teacher)

Approximate cost of project during current year (from Perkins funds only)

IMPROVEMENT FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAM OF STUDY PROJECT

* What program of study are you going to improve -

* Cluster:

* Pathway

* Program of Study:

* School name:

* Teacher name(s):

* Is this the first year of improvement for this program of study: [] Yes [] No

* Is this program of study high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand pathways according to the state's list. If the program of study does not meet all three of the above designations, regional data must be provided to document that the program is high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand.

* Identify which of the required uses or permissive uses of funds this project meets.

* How will the success of this project be measured? What data will you review to determine achievement on the performance indicator selected to improve? What set of students will you measure?

* Describe the types of industry certification are available and how instruction and funding will be provided for these:

* Certifications for the program

* Certifications for the teacher(s)

* Certifications for the students

* Describe what professional development will be needed to achieve this improvement and how you will coordinate with NCLB professional development activities.

* For the CTE teacher

* Integration

* Applied learning

* Curriculum planning

* Knowledge and understanding of industry standards

* Knowledge and skills to work with special populations

* Knowledge to know how to access and utilize data

* For academic teachers:

* Integration

* Applied learning

* Curriculum planning

* For administrators and counselors:

* All aspects of industry

* Academic requirements

* Program of study information

* Describe the new software or curriculum that will be required

* Describe the equipment will be needed to achieve this improvement

* Describe the related academic courses and identify any additional academic courses above the smart core that are required for this program of study

* Are the CTE frameworks adequate to provide the necessary technical skills students will need and, if not, describe the modifications that will be made on the frameworks

* Describe the resources that will be available to assure that sub-population students are successful

* How will work-based learning opportunities be made available (apprenticeship, internship, job shadowing, etc)

EXPLANATION OF CURRENT YEAR ACTIVITIES/PURCHASES FOR THIS PROJECT

Describe the financial costs for this project that will be paid from the Perkins funds during the current year.

* Salary/benefits/stipends

* Professional development expenses (including travel)

* Consultant costs

* Instructional materials/supplies/curriculum

* Software

* Other

* Equipment and other non-consumable items that cost more than $200: Approximate cost of project during current year (from Perkins funds only)

Attachment 3 - Postsecondary Local Application

SECTION 1 : ASSURANCES AND CERTIFICATIONS

* Name and Address of Institution/Consortium

* If consortium, list all member institutions

* Local Coordinator Name and Contact Information

* Basic Grant Amount

* Signature of President, Chief Academic Officer, and Chief Financial Officer

* Statement of Assurances and Certifications

SECTION 2 : OP1-ADMINISTRATIVE FUNDS

* How will administrative funds be used?

* Amount of basic grant allocated to administrative uses (not to exceed 5% of total grant)

SECTION 3 : 1P1-TECHNICAL SKILLS ATTAINMENT CORE INDICATOR Core Indicator Overview

* Current year local target

* Local and state historical performance results

* Was actual performance result within 90% of core indicator target

* CIP codes of programs of study targeted for technical skills improvement

* Description of data used to determine core indicator need and to select activities that address the need

* Description of status of improvement plan required for the indicator, if appropriate.

Activity Description (for each activity in support of the indicator)

* Activity number/name

* Number of years previously funded by Perkins

* If previously funded, summary of previous years' results

* Activity description

* How performance will be measured and the expected measurable outcome

* CIP code(s) of programs of study targeted by this activity

* Number of Perkins concentrators affected by this activity

Activity Budget

* Activity cost by budget category and function category (projected, amended, and actual)

* Required or permissive use of funds

Amendments

* Description of approved amendments

* Staff approval

Compliance

* Annual compliance review or technical assistance observations

Performance

* Actual measurable outcome

SECTION 4 : 2P1-CREDENTIAL ATTAINMENT CORE INDICATOR

SECTION 5 : 3P1-STUDENT RETENTION CORE INDICATOR

SECTION 6 : 4P1-STUDENT PLACEMENT CORE INDICATOR

SECTION 7 : 5P1-NONTRADITIONAL PARTICIPATION CORE INDICATOR

SECTION 8 : 5P2-NONTRADITIONAL CREDENTIAL ATTAINMENT CORE INDICATOR

SECTION 9 : ACROSS ALL INDICATORS PROJECT

Project Description (for project)

* Activity number/name

* Number of years previously funded by Perkins

* If previously funded, summary of previous years' results

* Project description

* Summary of project

* Indicate which performance indicator this project will most impact (only one)

* Estimate of number of students, faculty, support staff, or administrators affected by this project

* List all core indicators that will be improved as a result of this project

* Description of data used to determine project need and to select activities that address the need

* How performance will be measured and the expected measurable outcome

Activity Budget

* Activity cost by budget category and function category (projected, amended, and actual)

* Required or permissive use of funds

Amendments

* Description of approved amendments

* Staff approval

Compliance

* Annual compliance review or technical assistance observations

Performance

* Actual measurable outcome

SECTION 10 : SPECIFIC PROGRAM OF STUDY PROJECT

* Career cluster

* Career pathway

* Program of study CIP

* Does this program of study meet high skill, high wage, and high demand designations or support emerging industries?

* If the program does not meet the required designations, regional data must be provided to document that the program meets the designations locally (exceptions will be rare).

Project Description (for each program of study)

* Activity number/name

* Number of years previously funded by Perkins

* If previously funded, summary of previous years' results

* Project description

* Summary of project

* Describe how academic and technical coursework will be integrated

* Describe equipment/supplies to be purchased

* Describe professional development required (CTE and academic faculty/administrators/staff)

* Describe how special populations, include nontraditional students, will be affected

* Describe how work-based learning will be integrated into the project

* Number of Perkins concentrators affected by this activity

* List all core indicators that will be improved as a result of this project

* Description of data used to determine project need and to select activities that address the need

* How performance will be measured and the expected measurable outcome

Activity Budget

* Activity cost by budget category and function category (projected, amended, and actual)

* Required or permissive use of funds

Amendments

* Description of approved amendments

* Staff approval

Compliance

* Annual compliance review or technical assistance observations

Performance

* Actual measurable outcome

SECTION 11 : BUDGET SUMMARY

* Summary of all activities by budget category (original and amended)

* Reimbursement ledger

* Total basic grant allocation

* 5% maximum administration funds

* 25% first quarter maximum

SECTION 12 : REQUEST FOR REIMBURSEMENT

* Activity number

* Budget category

* Transaction date

* Payee

* Purchase order

* Invoice/tracking document

* Inventory # assigned

* Amount

Attachment 4 - Grant Awards for 2008-09

Secondary (includes $524,816 of carryover funds)

        

1701

Alma School District

$44,317

0501

Alpena School District

$9,402

1002

Arkadelphia School District

$39,170

4701

Armorel School District

$3,321

4101

Ashdown School District

$26,576

5801

Atkins School District

$20,782

7401

Augusta School District

$22,276

7301

Bald Knob School District

$26,129

5401

Barton-Lexa School District

$16,570

3201

Batesville School District

$42,505

6301

Bauxite School District

$13,752

1601

Bay School District

$9,179

5201

Bearden School District

$12,192

7302

Beebe School District

$41,114

6302

Benton School District

$55,652

0401

Bentonville School District

$100,944

0502

Bergman School District

$13,916

0801

Berryville School District

$34,874

3001

Bismarck School District

$16,686

2901

Blevins School District

$13,202

4702

Blytheville School District

$101,748

4201

Booneville School District

$29,709

7303

Bradford School District

$11,282

3701

Bradley School District

$10,203

4801

Brinkley School District

$21,988

1603

Brookland School District

$19,714

6303

Bryant School District

$77,783

1605

Buffalo Is. Central School District

$12,829

4304

Cabot School District

$94,537

4901

Caddo Hills School District

$16,056

3301

Calico Rock School District

$11,625

5204

Camden Fairview School District

$61,948

4303

Carlisle School District

$13,629

6802

Cave City School District

$23,629

3212

Cedar Ridge School District

$15,391

1702

Cedarville School District

$16,752

5502

Centerpoint School District

$18,916

2402

Charleston School District

$12,017

4802

Clarendon School District

$17,926

3601

Clarksville School District

$41,926

1305

Cleveland County School District

$18,628

7102

Clinton School District

$29,628

1201

Concord School District

$11,890

2301

Conway School District

$121,570

1101

Corning School District

$27,968

0302

Cotter School District

$13,830

2403

County Line School District

$11,152

1901

Cross County School District

$14,570

0201

Crossett School District

$45,638

3203

Cushman School District

$4,183

2601

Cutter-Morning Star School District

$10,833

7503

Danville School District

$11,237

7504

Dardanelle School District

$26,548

0402

Decatur School District

$8,551

5106

Deer/Mount Judea School District

$9,958

5501

Delight School District

$5,695

6701

DeQueen School District

$51,055

0901

Dermott School District

$20,124

5901

Des Arc School District

$11,421

0101

DeWitt School District

$25,762

3102

Dierks School District

$9,323

3502

Dollarway School District

$54,230

5802

Dover School District

$20,046

2202

Drew Central School District

$19,268

2104

Dumas School District

$46,438

1802

Earle School District

$28,351

5301

East End School District

$12,137

5608

East Poinsett Co. School District

$16,884

7001

El Dorado School District

$94,390

7201

Elkins School District

$13,131

1408

Emerson-Taylor School District

$10,695

4302

England School District

$14,910

0802

Eureka Springs School District

$16,699

7202

Farmington School District

$21,343

7203

Fayetteville School District

$135,741

4501

Flippin School District

$21,676

2002

Fordyce School District

$20,604

4102

Foreman School District

$9,514

6201

Forrest City School District

$110,819

6601

Fort Smith School District

$270,362

4603

Fouke School District

$14,361

2602

Fountain Lake School District

$24,086

4602

Genoa Central School District

$16,001

0403

Gentry School District

$17,047

3002

Glen Rose School District

$16,251

4708

Gosnell School District

$22,705

0404

Gravette School District

$24,016

0803

Green Forest School District

$20,613

2303

Greenbrier School District

$31,440

2807

Greene Co. Tech School District

$53,311

7204

Greenland School District

$17,043

6602

Greenwood School District

$35,639

1003

Gurdon School District

$14,710

2304

Guy-Perkins School District

$6,606

6603

Hackett School District

$8,298

0203

Hamburg School District

$39,612

0701

Hampton School District

$11,913

5205

Harmony Grove School District (Ouachita Co)

$15,221

6304

Harmony Grove School District (Saline Co)

$11,113

5602

Harrisburg School District

$22,264

0503

Harrison School District

$47,447

6604

Hartford School District

$9,847

5903

Hazen School District

$13,995

1202

Heber Springs School District

$27,917

5803

Hector School District

$14,166

5403

Helena/W.Helena School District

$101,442

0601

Hermitage School District

$12,220

6804

Highland School District

$36,120

3809

Hillcrest School District

$8,394

2903

Hope School District

$65,933

6703

Horatio School District

$16,026

2603

Hot Springs School District

$102,949

3804

Hoxie School District

$18,319

6202

Hughes School District

$21,549

4401

Huntsville School District

$44,427

3306

Izard Co. Cons. School District

$12,902

3405

Jackson Co. School District

$15,219

5102

Jasper School District

$21,413

2604

Jessieville School District

$11,668

1608

Jonesboro School District

$107,050

7003

Junction City School District

$8,628

5503

Kirby School District

$9,577

3704

Lafayette County School District

$24,135

2605

Lake Hamilton School District

$56,881

0903

Lakeside School District (Chicot Co)

$52,758

2606

Lakeside School District (Garland)

$35,400

3604

Lamar School District

$18,299

6605

Lavaca School District

$11,585

3810

Lawrence County School District

$22,618

0506

Lead Hill School District

$7,448

3904

Lee County School District

$56,731

7205

Lincoln School District

$23,739

6001

Little Rock School District

$501,576

4301

Lonoke School District

$29,039

4202

Magazine School District

$10,515

3003

Magnet Cove School District

$11,135

1402

Magnolia School District

$64,156

3004

Malvern School District

$45,819

2501

Mammoth Spring School District

$8,509

4712

Manila School District

$14,823

6606

Mansfield School District

$19,318

1804

Marion School District

$60,648

5604

Marked Tree School District

$18,327

2803

Marmaduke School District

$17,462

5404

Marvell School District

$35,576

2305

Mayflower School District

$11,190

6102

Maynard School District

$9,503

7403

McCrory School District

$10,765

2105

McGehee School District

$36,022

3302

Melbourne School District

$14,246

5703

Mena School District

$44,768

3211

Midland School District

$10,169

3104

Mineral Springs School District

$14,754

2203

Monticello School District

$39,900

4902

Mount Ida School District

$9,927

0303

Mountain Home School District

$65,855

2607

Mountain Pine School District

$11,870

6901

Mountain View School District

$40,206

1703

Mountainburg School District

$14,157

2306

Mt. Vernon/Enola School District

$5,993

1704

Mulberry/Pleasant View School District

$12,131

5504

Murfreesboro School District

$7,175

3105

Nashville School District

$31,521

1503

Nemo Vista School District

$7,434

1611

Nettleton School District

$47,133

5008

Nevada School District

$8,599

3403

Newport School District

$42,101

0304

Norfork School District

$8,720

7006

Norphlet School District

$7,447

6002

North Little Rock School District

$211,532

0504

Omaha School District

$9,761

4713

Osceola School District

$49,273

5706

Ouachita River School District

$12,608

3005

Ouachita School District

$5,733

6505

Ozark Mountain School District

$21,139

2404

Ozark School District

$34,169

6205

Palestine/Wheatley School District

$9,761

7309

Pangburn School District

$12,267

2808

Paragould School District

$53,769

4203

Paris School District

$24,548

7007

Parkers Chapel School District

$8,287

0407

Pea Ridge School District

$16,342

5303

Perryville School District

$14,618

1104

Piggott School District

$14,801

3505

Pine Bluff School District

$144,435

6103

Pocahontas School District

$34,846

5804

Pottsville School District

$22,255

2703

Poyen School District

$4,962

7206

Prairie Grove School District

$20,926

5006

Prescott School District

$20,051

6003

Pulaski County School District

$302,595

1203

Quitman School District

$10,197

1106

Rector School District

$10,826

1613

Riverside School District

$17,158

7307

Riverview School District

$28,213

0405

Rogers School District

$176,290

7310

Rose Bud School District

$15,982

5805

Russellville School District

$80,881

2502

Salem School District

$14,194

4204

Scranton School District

$4,211

6502

Searcy County School District

$23,105

7311

Searcy School District

$58,587

2705

Sheridan School District

$54,667

7104

Shirley School District

$11,021

0406

Siloam Springs School District

$44,342

3806

Sloan-Hendrix School District

$13,589

7008

Smackover School District

$11,706

1507

So. Conway Co. School District

$44,539

4706

So. Miss. County School District

$29,738

7105

South Side School District (Bee Branch)

$8,275

3209

Southside School District (Batesville)

$22,071

2906

Spring Hill School District

$5,672

7207

Springdale School District

$203,240

4003

Star City School District

$36,369

5206

Stephens School District

$17,331

7009

Strong-Huttig School District

$12,946

0104

Stuttgart School District

$37,319

4605

Texarkana School District

$122,014

5605

Trumann School District

$40,785

1805

Turrell School District

$9,986

6806

Twin Rivers School District

$11,634

7510

Two Rivers School District

$25,518

0505

Valley Springs School District

$15,502

1612

Valley View School District

$16,351

1705

Van Buren School District

$99,175

5704

Van Cove School District

$8,792

2307

Vilonia School District

$28,703

2503

Viola School District

$8,064

6401

Waldron School District

$35,634

0602

Warren School District

$32,038

3509

Watson Chapel School District

$58,348

5607

Weiner School District

$4,952

7208

West Fork School District

$16,690

1803

West Memphis School District

$155,751

1204

West Side School District (Cleburne Co)

$10,085

7509

Western Yell Co. School District

$9,819

1602

Westside Cons. School District (Craighead Co)

$22,744

3606

Westside School District (Johnson Co)

$14,778

7304

White Co. Central School District

$10,683

3510

White Hall School District

$39,967

5705

Wickes School District

$15,872

1505

Wonderview School District

$8,237

1304

Woodlawn School District

$5,899

1905

Wynne School District

$56,239

4502

Yellville-Summit School District

$22,472

Postsecondary (includes $177,543 of carryover funds)

Institution

Grant

Arikansas Northeastern

$101,850

ASU Beebe

$175,550

ASU Jonesboro

$38,385

ASU IVIountain Home

$64,488

ASU Newport

$132,046

Arikansas Tech

$102,361

Blacik River Tech College

$186,809

Cossatot CC of UA

$53,740

East Arkansas CC

$53,740

Mid-South CC

$47,086

North Arkansas College

$199,605

National Park CC

$154,566

Northwest Arkansas CC

$70,629

Ouachita Tech College

$78,306

Ozarka College

$85,984

Phillips CC of UA

$142,282

Pulaski Tech

$362,871

Rich Mountain

$29,173

South Arkansas

$105,432

SAU Magnolia

$15,354

SAU Tech

$38,385

Southeast Arkansas College

$189,880

UACC Batesville

$111,062

UACC Hope

$99,802

UACC Morrilton

$79,842

UA Fort Smith

$166,337

UA Little Rock

$19,449

UA Monticello

$89,054

CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING

Applicants must review the requirements for certification regarding lobbying included in the regulations cited below before completing this form. Applicants must sign this form to comply with the certification requirements under 34 CFR Part 82, "New Restrictions on Lobbying." This certification is a material representation of fact upon which the Department of Education relies when it makes a grant or enters into a cooperative agreement.

As required by Section 1352, Title 31 of the U.S. Code, and implemented at 34 CFR Part 82, for persons entering into a Federal contract, grant or cooperative agreement over $100,000, as defined at 34 CFR Part 82, Sections 82.105 and 82.110, the applicant certifies that:

(a) No Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid, by or on behalf of the undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with the making of any Federal grant, the entering into of any cooperative agreement, and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal grant or cooperative agreement;

(b) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal grant or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and submit Standard Form -LLL, "Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying," in accordance with its instructions;

(c) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be included in the award documents for all subawards at all tiers (including subgrants and contracts under grants and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify and disclose accordingly.

As the duly authorized representative of the applicant, I hereby certify that the applicant will comply with the above certification.

ASSURANCES - NON-CONSTRUCTION PROGRAMS

Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 15 minutes per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0348-0040), Washington, DC 20503

PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR COMPLETED FORM TO THE OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET. SEND IT TO THE ADDRESS PROVIDED BY THE SPONSORING AGENCY.

Note: Certain of these assurances may not be applicable to your project or program. If you have questions, please contact the awarding agency. Further, certain Federal awarding agencies may require applicants to certify to additional assurances. If such is the case, you will be notified.

As the duly authorized representative of the applicant I certify that the applicant:

1. Has the legal authority to apply for Federal assistance, and the institutional, managerial and financial capability (including funds sufficient to pay the non-Federal share of project cost) to ensure proper planning, management, and completion of the project described in this application.

2. Will give the awarding agency, the Comptroller General of the United States, and if appropriate, the State, through any authorized representative, access to and the right to examine all records, books, papers, or documents related to the award; and will establish a proper accounting system in accordance with generally accepted accounting standards or agency directives.

3. Will establish safeguards to prohibit employees from using their positions for a purpose that constitutes or presents the appearance of personal or organizational conflict of interest, or personal gain.

4. Will initiate and complete the work within the applicable time frame after receipt of approval of the awarding agency.

5. Will comply with the Intergovernmental Personnel Act of 1970 (42 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]4728-4763) relating to prescribed standards for merit systems for programs funded under one of the 19 statutes or regulations specified in Appendix A of OPM's Standards for a Merit System of Personnel Administration (5 C.F.R. 900, Subpart F).

6. Will comply with all Federal statutes relating to nondiscrimination. These include but are not limited to:

(a) Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-352) which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin;

(b) Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended (20 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]1681-1683, and 1685-1686), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex;

(c) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. [BACK EPSILON]794), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of handicaps;

(d) the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended (42 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON] 6101-6107), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age;

(e) the Drug Abuse Office and Treatment Act of 1972 (P.L. 92-255), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of drug abuse;

(f) the Comprehensive Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Prevention, Treatment and Rehabilitation Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-616), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination on the basis of alcohol abuse or alcoholism;

(g) [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON] 523 and 527 of the Public Health Service Act of 1912 (42 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]290 dd-3 and 290 ee 3), as amended, relating to confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records;

(h) Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. [BACK EPSILON] 3601 et seq.), as amended, relating to nondiscrimination in the sale, rental or financing of housing;

(i) any other nondiscrimination provisions in the specific statute(s) under which application for Federal assistance is being made; and (j) the requirements of any other nondiscrimination statute(s) which may apply to the application.

7. Will comply, or has already complied, with the requirements of Titles II and III of the uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-646) which provide for fair and equitable treatment of persons displaced or whose property is acquired as a result of Federal or federally assisted programs. These requirements apply to all interests in real property acquired for project purposes regardless of Federal participation in purchases.

8. Will comply, as applicable, with the provisions of the Hatch Act (5 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]1501-1508 and 7324-7328) which limit the political activities of employees whose principal employment activities are funded in whole or in part with Federal funds.

9. Will comply, as applicable, with the provisions of the Davis-Bacon Act (40 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]276a to 276a-7), the Copeland Act (40 U.S.C. [BACK EPSILON]276c and 18 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]874) and the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON] 327-333), regarding labor standards for federally assisted construction subagreements.

10. Will comply, if applicable, with flood insurance purchase requirements of Section 102(a) of the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973 (P.L. 93-234) which requires recipients in a special flood hazard area to participate in the program and to purchase flood insurance if the total cost of insurable construction and acquisition is $10,000 or more.

11. Will comply with environmental standards which may be prescribed pursuant to the following:

(a) institution of environmental quality control measures under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (P.L. 91-190) and Executive Order (EO) 11514;

(b) notification of violating facilities pursuant to EO 11738;

(c) protection of wetlands pursuant to EO 11990;

(d) evaluation of flood hazards in floodplains in accordance with EO 11988;

(e) assurance of project consistency with the approved State management program developed under the Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972 (16 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]1451 et seq.);

(f) conformity of Federal actions to State (Clear Air) Implementation Plans under Section 176(c) of the Clear Air Act of 1955, as amended (42 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]7401 et seq.);

(g) protection of underground sources of drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as amended, (P.L. 93-523); and

(h) protection of endangered species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, (P.L. 93-205).

12 Will comply with the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968 (16 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]1721 et seq.) related to protecting components or potential components of the national wild and scenic rivers system.

13. Will assist the awarding agency in assuring compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. [BACK EPSILON]470), EO 11593 (identification and protection of historic properties), and the Archaeological and Historic Preservation Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]469a-1 et seq.).

14. Will comply with P.L. 93-348 regarding the protection of human subjects involved in research, development, and related activities supported by this award of assistance.

15. Will comply with the Laboratory Animal Welfare Act of 1966 (P.L. 89-544, as amended, 7 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]2131 et seq.) pertaining to the care, handling, and treatment of warm blooded animals held for research, teaching, or other activities supported by this award of assistance.

16. Will comply with the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. [DOUBLE BACK EPSILON]4801 et seq.) which prohibits the use of lead- based paint in construction or rehabilitation of residence structures.

17. Will cause to be performed the required financial and compliance audits in accordance with the Single Audit Act Amendments of 1996 and OMB Circular No. A-133, AAudits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations. [APPROXIMATELY EQUAL]

18. Will comply with all applicable requirements of all other Federal laws, executive orders, regulations and policies governing this program.

SIGNATURE OF AUTHORIZED CERTIFYING OFFICIAL

TITLE

Director

APPLICANT ORGANIZATION

Arkansas Department of Workforce Education

DATE SUBMITTED

Disclosure of Lobbying Activities

Complete this form to disclose lobbying activities pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1352

(See reverse for public burden disclosure)

SECONDARY LEVEL

                 
                 

1S1

Academic

Attainment -

Reading/Language

Arts

113(b)(2)(A)(i)

Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who have met the proficient or advanced level on the Statewide high school reading/language arts assessment administered by the State under Section 1111(b)(3) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act based on the scores that were included in the State's computation of adequate yearly progress (AYP) and who, in the reporting year, left secondary education. Denominator: Number of CTE concentrators who took the ESEA assessment in

reading/language arts whose scores were included in the State's computation of AYP

and who, in the reporting year, left secondary education.

State

Administrative

Records

B: 39.08% (2005-06)

L: 43.56% (AMO for NCLB)

A:

L: 51.63% (AMO for NCLB)

A:

1S2

Academic

Attainment -

Mathematics

113(b)(2)(A)(i)

Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who have met the proficient or advanced level on the Statewide high school mathematics assessment administered by the State under Section 1111(b)(3) of the (ESEA) as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act based on the scores that were included in the State's computation of adequate yearly progress (AYP) and who, in the reporting year, left secondary education.

Denominator: Number of CTE concentrators who took the ESEA assessment in

mathematics whose scores were included in the State's computation of AYP and who, in the reporting year, have left secondary education.

State

Administrative

Records

B: 41.33% (2005-06)

L: 29.20% (AMO for NCLB)

A:

L: 38.05% (AMO for NCLB)

A:

2S1 Technical Skill

Attainment 113(b)(2)(A)(ii)

Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who were proficient on assessments taken within the program of study and who left the secondary system during the reporting year Denominator: Number of all CTE concentrators that were tested and left the secondary system during the reporting year

State

Administrative

Records

B: 55.97% (2006-07)

  

L: 57% A:

3S1 Secondary School Completion 113(b)(2)(A)(iii)(I-III)

Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators that graduate plus the number of CTE concentrators that receive a GED during the reporting year

Denominator: Number of CTE concentrators that left the secondary system during the reporting year

State

Administrative

Records

B: 92% (2006-07)

  

L: 92.1% A:

4S1

Student Graduation

Rates

113(b)(2)(A)(iv)

Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who, in the reporting year, were included as graduated in the State's computation of its graduation rate as described in Section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vi) of the ESEA. Denominator: Number of CTE concentrators who, in the reporting year, were included in the State's computation of its graduation rate as defined in the State's Consolidated Accountability Plan pursuant to Section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vi) of the ESEA.

State

Administrative

Records

B: 86% for all students in 2005-06 NCLB

L: 86.0% A:

L: 86.5% A:

5S1

Secondary

Placement

113(b)(2)(A)(v)

Numerator: Number of CTE concentrators who successfully completed the program of study and graduated from high school and who were employed, enrolled in postsecondary, or in the military six months following graduation Denominator: Number of CTE concentrators who successfully completed the program of study and graduated from high school during the reporting year and were found six months following graduation

Local Survey

B: 94.66% (2006-07)

  

L: 94.76% A:

6S1

Nontraditional

Participation

113(b)(2)(A)(vi)

Numerator: Number of nontraditional gender students enrolled in one or more units within a program of study that is nontraditional for their gender during the reporting year

Denominator: Number of all students enrolled in the nontraditional programs of study during the reporting year

State

Administrative

Records

B: 24.86% (2006-07)

  

L: 24.91% A:

6S2 Nontraditional

Completion 113(b)(2)(A)(vi)

Numerator: Number of nontraditional gender concentrators who successfully complete programs of study designated nontraditional and graduate from high school during the reporting year Denominator: Number of all concentrators who successfully complete nontraditional programs during the reporting year

State

Administrative

Records

B: 19.74% (2006-07)

  

L: 19.84% A:

1P1 Technical Skill

Attainment 113(b)(2)(B)(i)

Numerator: The number of CTE

concentrators who passed technical skill assessments

Denominator: The number of CTE

concentrators who took technical skill assessments during the reporting year

Academic & CTE coursework GPA

B: 49.96% (2005-07)

L: A:

L: 50.96% A:

2P1

Credential,

Certificate, or Degree

113(b)(2)(B)(ii)

Numerator: The number of CTE concentrators who received an industry-recognized credential, certificate or degree during the reporting year Denominator: The number of CTE concentrators who left postsecondary education during the reporting year

AHESIS administrative records to compare student enrollment in previous and current academic years

B: 68.16% (2004-06)

L: A:

L: 68.41% A:

3P1

Student Retention or

Transfer

113(b)(2)(B)(iii)

Numerator: The number of CTE concentrators who remained enrolled in their original postsecondary institution or transferred to another 2- or 4-year postsecondary institution during the reporting year and who were enrolled in postsecondary education in the fall of the previous reporting year Denominator: The number of CTE concentrators who were enrolled in postsecondary education in the fall of the previous reporting year and who did not earn a credential, certificate or degree in the previous reporting year

AHESIS administrative records to compare student enrollment in previous and current academic years

B: 37.85% (2004-06)

L: A:

L: 38.10% A:

4P1

Student Placement

113(b)(2)(B)(iv)

Numerator: The number of CTE concentrators who were placed or retained in employment, or placed in military service or apprenticeship programs in the 2nd quarter following the program year in which they left postsecondary education

Denominator: The number of CTE concentrators who left postsecondary education during the reporting year

AHESIS administrative records used to determine students that left the postsecondary system and state wage records used to determine placement in employment.

B: 8.60% (2004-06)

L: A:

L: 9.60% A:

5P1

Nontraditional

Participation

113(b)(2)(B)(v)

Numerator: The number of CTE participants from underrepresented gender groups who participated in a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year

Denominator: The number of CTE participants who participated in a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year

AHESIS records used to determined participation of CTE participants in CTE designated CIPs

B: 23.73% (2005-07)

L: A:

L: 23.83% A:

5P2 Nontraditional

Completion 113(b)(2)(B)(v)

Numerator: The number of CTE concentrators from underrepresented gender groups who completed a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year Denominator: The number of CTE concentrators who completed a program that leads to employment in nontraditional fields during the reporting year

AHESIS records used to determined completion of CTE concentrators in CTE designated CIPs

B: 14.43% (2004-06)

L: A:

L: 14.53% A:

(4/11/2008)

The following state regulations pages link to this page.