RULE 172.00.02-002 - Program Policies and Procedures: Secondary Programs Adult Skill Training Classes and Secondary Vocational Centers

RULE 172.00.02-002. Program Policies and Procedures: Secondary Programs Adult Skill Training Classes and Secondary Vocational Centers

I. DEFINITIONS

A. CAREER FOCUS/PROGRAMS OF STUDY - A planned coherent sequence of courses as defined by the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education.

B. CONCENTRATOR - A student who has completed two Carnegie units of credit within an occupational area, during grades 9-12.

C. COMPLETER - A student who has completed three Carnegie units of credit in grades 9-12 including all the required core courses in a career focus/program of study and graduated from high school. If core classes are taught below ninth grade level, they may be counted toward the completer status.

D. EQUIPMENT-

1. The item costs $100 or more.

2. It retains its original shape, appearance, and/or character with use.

3. It does not lose its identity through fabrication or incorporation into a different or more complex unit or substance.

4. It is non-expendable; that is, if the item is damaged or some of its parts are lost or worn out, it is more feasible to repair the item than to replace it with an entirely new unit.

5. Under normal conditions of use, including reasonable care and maintenance, it can be expected to serve its principal purpose for at least two years.

E. MINIMUM EQUIPMENT LIST - Equipment and program specific software that is required for approval and operation of new Career Focus Programs of Study and foundation courses.

F. EXPANDED CAREER FOCUS PROGRAMS OF STUDY - The addition of faculty to the existing career and technical program and/or the replacement of an existing career focus program of study. For purposes of start-up funding, only one change in a career focus program of study per occupational area is allowable.

G. FULL-TIME CAREER AND TECHNICAL INSTRUCTOR - A full-time teacher is a teacher teaching 4 or more periods (on a six-period day basis). A teacher teaching less than 4 periods is considered a half-time teacher. Definition applies only for purposes of new program start-up and equipment upgrade/replacement funds.

H. PARTICIPANT - A student who is enrolled in a career and technical course during the reporting period.

I. "SHALL" - The use of "shall" in these regulations indicates that the activity is mandatory.

J. SHORT-TERM ADULT SKILLS TRAINING - Adult skills training classes offered on a short-term basis for the purpose of training and upgrading the workforce.

II. PROGRAM APPROVAL

A. CONTINUATION OF PROGRAMS

1. Program information for all Secondary Career and Technical Programs is to be submitted to the Deputy Director for Career and Technical Education by October 1 of each school year.

2. Annual continuation_all programs (teacher units) is contingent upon compliance with the Secondary Policies and Procedures as set by the State Board of Workforce Education and Career Opportunities (SBWECO). Schools will not receive annual continuation that have not eliminated any critical elements identified during technical assistance visits.

3. Schools may not offer for graduation credit any workforce education class not approved by the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education.

B. ACCOUNTABILITY

Profound economic and technological changes in our society are being reflected in the structure and nature of work, thereby placing new and additional responsibilities on our educational system.

The ever-increasing cooperative efforts of career and technical educators, business, and industry are critical to stimulate the growth and vitality of our local economy and that of the entire nation. Career and technical education must provide Arkansas business and industry with a well-educated workforce able to pursue all levels of post secondary education. The development of school to career connection which offer individuals lifelong opportunities to learn new skills, experience practical and meaningful applications of rigorous academic skills, and to develop leadership opportunities in their community and their state is vital. Arkansas Career and Technical programs must not only respond to the changing workplace needs, but must validate and document indicators of quality:

The following items will be reviewed annually to maintain program continuation:

* Academic skill attainment

* Technical skill attainment

* Number of students completing career focus

* Placement of students in postsecondary education

* Placement of students in the Workforce

C. GRANTS FOR NEW OR EXPANDED CAREER FOCUS PROGRAMS OF STUDY

1. Grant awards shall be available for the exclusive purpose of purchasing equipment and program specific software to support newly approved Career Focus Programs of Study, foundation courses, Expanded Programs of Study, and changes in career focuses associated with career and technical education.

2. The factors used for determining the amount of the grant awards are:

* The projected enrollment for the career focus program of study/career and/or course.

* The type of equipment that meets program standards and criteria.

* Amount of funds available.

* Number of applications submitted and quality of the proposals.

* The economic demand of the program area.

Proposed specialized career and technical programs in local districts located within a 25-mile radius or within 30 minutes travel time (one way) of a vocational center or postsecondary vocational technical institution offering the same program will not be approved unless the program offered by the vocational center or the postsecondary institution is operating to an efficient and effective level. This level shall be considered an average of 15 students for full time programs or equivalent for part-time programs. Some examples of specialized programs are: Dental Assisting, Auto Service Technology, Auto Collision Repair, Aviation Mechanics, Cosmetology, Culinary Arts, Diesel Mechanics, Electronics, Graphic Communication, HV/AC and Refrigeration, Industrial Equipment Maintenance, and Machine Tool Technology.

3. School districts and secondary vocational centers shall submit a proposal for new program start-up by October 1 prior to implementation in the following school year.

4. The grant award(s) shall not exceed the cost of equipment as established by the Department of Workforce Educations' Program Standards.

5. To fully utilize the grant award, a district may combine state and local funds for only one item of equipment.

6. The equipment purchased with state funds authorized under the biennial appropriation for grants and aids to school districts (public school fund) shall be utilized only for the activities for which it was originally approved and purchased and shall not be used in any other fashion without prior written approval of the Department.

7. Grant awards shall be distributed to school districts and secondary vocational centers on a reimbursement basis. Reimbursement requests for new program start-up shall be submitted on the Form WE-4 to the state office at any time prior to the March 15 deadline. The request for reimbursement of state funds shall not exceed the amount of the grant award. Waivers may be given for the advancement of grant funds.

8. The Department shall retain a vested interest in the equipment and program specific software purchased with new program start-up grants for the life cycle of the equipment.

9. For new program start-up equipment and program specific software, it is the responsibility of the local school district and secondary vocational centers to maintain and repair the equipment purchased with the State grant during its life cycle. Equipment will be depreciated at the rate of 14.29% per annum with the exception of computers which depreciate at the rate of 20% per annum. After the life cycle of the equipment (7 years or 5 years), it will become the property of the local school district and/or secondary vocational center.

10. The Department will periodically provide up-to-date equipment standards for each occupational program and foundation course. Prior written approval is required for any equipment items that are not on the Department's Equipment Standards List.

11. A one-time grant award to schools for start-up equipment shall be available for each occupational area for the purpose of replacing an existing career focus program of study with a new career focus program of study.

12. Request to restart a closed program shall be funded only if funds have not been granted within the last six years.

13. Vocational center programs shall be funded at not less than $25,000 per request.

III. PROGRAM DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND EVALUATION

A. Program approval is granted for a five-year cycle and corresponds with the technical assistance visit. Programs granted five year approval status must:

* Follow all policies and procedures

* Document performance indicators

* Remove all critical elements identified in technical assistance visits

* Respond to all previous five year recommendations of technical assistance

B. ADULT SKILLS TRAINING (SHORT-TERM)

1. The Department will approve adult skill training programs/courses upon availability of funds under the biennial appropriation.

2. Funding for faculty salaries for short-term adult classes sponsored by the secondary public schools will be provided at an hourly rate of $15 per direct contact instructional hour.

3. Upon the annual approval by the Department, grants to supplement salaries of full-time teacher(s) who have been designated to plan, design, develop, and direct the skill training programs-existing as of July 1, 1995-in Adult Education Centers may be approved.

4. Adult Education Centers with approved skill training courses that existed as of July 1, 1995, are required to establish a fee structure for students enrolled in the courses. A minimum charge of $20 per course or 50 cents per clock hour of instruction, whichever is less, shall be charged for all approved skill training adult classes (clock hours of instruction are the total hours approved for the course). Fifty dollars shall be the maximum fee assessed an individual student in any semester or other school term of lesser length. Annual reports are due July 15.

5. Approval of adult classes is contingent upon the following criteria:

a. A minimum enrollment of ten participants is required for approval of the class.

b. A minimum of six hours and a maximum of 60 hours_of instruction is required for approved courses.

c. Applications (Form WE-6) for adult classes are to be submitted to the applicable occupational program manager a minimum of two weeks prior to the beginning of the proposed class. (No classes will be approved after May 1.)

d. The applicable occupational program manager will notify the local school administrator/faculty/institution of approval/disapproval of the class.

e. Reimbursement of faculty salaries to the local entity will be initiated after the Class Enrollment Report (WE-PD-19) is received by the program manager. (All reimbursement requests must be received by May 30.)

C. ADVISORY COMMITTEE(S)

1. Each occupation-specific career and technical program shall have an active advisory committee or a school-wide advisory committee with representation from each occupation. Non-occupational Family and Consumer Science Education programs are not required to maintain an advisory committee. It is however, recommended.

2. The committee shall have appropriate representation of business/industry, male/female, and minority personnel. The committee shall meet twice annually and minutes should be kept.

3. The committees' functions should include program evaluation and technical assistance relating to program development, employment opportunities, skills requirements of the occupation, and specialized equipment acquisition.

D. CAREER PLANNING:

Upon completion of the eighth grade, each student shall have a four-year plan, which includes courses to be taken, on file. The career plan is then revisited each year for any necessary adjustments.

The Department of Workforce Education provides information for all approved career focus programs of study and courses. The Department has also published and distributed "The Basic Guide to Career Action Planning" for your assistance.

Providing career planning to individual students in a group setting that involves the student, parents, and teachers for grades 8-12 is the key.

For more information contact Arkansas Department of Workforce Education, Office of Support- Guidance and Special Needs, (501) 682-1800 or Arkansas Department of Education, School Improvement/COE Section, Guidance Field Service Representative, (501) 682-4354.

E. CLASS PERIODS - LENGTH

1. Class periods shall conform to the minimum class hours established by the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools and North Central Association (NCA). (NCA: 120 hours = 1 unit; 60 hours = ½ or .5 unit)

2. Each cooperative education student will have an average of 270 clock hours of on-the-job training per semester.

F. CLASS SIZE

1. Class size shall conform to the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools; however, enrollments may vary and will depend on the availability of equipment, tools, furniture and instructional materials which support the program.

2. Additionally, safety conditions are a consideration in the class size established.

G. COORDINATOR/TEACHER SUPERVISION PERIODS

1. For regular cooperative programs, coordinators will be assigned: one supervision period for 1-25 students, two supervision periods for 26-50 students, and three supervision periods for 51 or more students. The conference period may count as one of the three supervision periods.

2. For disadvantaged and handicapped students, coordinators will be assigned: one supervision period for 1-15 students, two supervision periods for 16-30 students, and three supervision periods for 31 or more students. The conference period may count as one of the three supervision periods.

H. CONTRACT LENGTH

1. Local school districts' and secondary vocational centers' governing authorities shall have the option of extending the length of vocational teachers' contracts beyond the minimum number of contract days required by the Standards for Accreditation of Public Schools.

2. Exception: State law requires 12-month contracts for agriculture teachers.

I. EQUIPMENT UPGRADE/REPLACEMENT FUNDS

1. Funds authorized for equipment upgrade/replacement by the biennial appropriation shall be distributed to school districts, and secondary vocational centers.

2. These funds are to be used to upgrade and/or replace obsolete equipment that is associated with career and technical programs.

3. The distribution of these funds shall be on the basis of the number of full-time equivalent teachers at each eligible institution during the preceding school year.

4. Documentation of expenditures shall be submitted to the Department by March 15 on the form provided at the time the notice of eligibility is given.

5. Local school districts and secondary vocational centers, shall have the option of expending the equipment upgrade/replacement funds in a single career focus program of study or course OR in multiple career and technical programs of study or courses.

J. FEDERAL FUNDS

1. Federal funds received by the district may be used only for items or expenditures allowable under the grants associated with the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998.

2. All equipment purchased with federal funds shall meet the minimum standards for occupational programs and shall follow the policy, procedures, and guidelines for equipment purchased with state funds as outlined herein.

3. Exception: For items exceeding $5,000 the code of federal regulations (EDGAR) is applicable.

K. FOUNDATION COURSES

Foundation courses are those classes which encompass the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in any selected career and technical program. These courses are prerequisite in nature and required for all career and technical program approvals. These courses are required to fulfill the 5-8 curriculum standards for accreditation of Arkansas Public Schools revised Edition B, January 10, 2000. These required courses are Career Orientation, Keyboarding, and Computer Technology Introduction. Schools who teach keyboarding below the seventh grade may not use federal funds to support this activity. Those, however who chose to provide Keyboarding instruction in elementary should certify skills through a state provided proficiency test.

L. LEVELS AND AREAS OF LICENSURE FOR ARKANSAS CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

1. Integrated Career and Technical Education Licensure

Arkansas Career and Technical teachers in the following areas:

Agriculture and Science Technology

Job Code 9010

Business Technology

Job Code 9015

Marketing Technology

Job Code 9030

Family and Consumer Sciences

Job Code 9025

Industrial Technology Education

Job Code 9045

will be licensed through a performance based licensure system. Beginning teachers (novice teachers with less than one year of teaching experience will complete the following track:

All teachers must have completed a minimum of a bachelor's level degree in an approved program of study within the corresponding area of licensure. Applicants must also complete required background checks and submit application for Licensure to the Arkansas Department of Education.

All teachers must have successfully completed the following assessments:

Praxis I

Reading, Writing, Math

Praxis II

Content Test

Praxis II

Principles of Learning and Teaching

Persons who complete the above requirements are eligible for an initial teaching license. An initial teaching license is valid for not less than one year, and no more than three years. During the initial licensure time, novice teachers are considered to be in a time of induction.

During induction, novice teachers will have a site-based trained mentor assigned to support their practice and professional growth. When novice teachers and their mentors decide that their teaching meets the mentoring requirements, the capstone experience of induction, which is Praxis III performance assessment, will be scheduled.

Upon successful completion of the performance assessment a standard teaching license will be issued.

Licensure renewal is based upon a five-year cycle, during which all educators are required to accrue 30 professional development hours per year.

2. Added Career and Technical Endorsements for Level A.Y.A. (Adolescents and Young Adults)

Instructors who desire to teach identified courses, which require specific training not offered through Career and Technical approved programs of study may receive added endorsement to an existing teaching license by completing the requirements identified for the following course specific-areas. Specific requirements for each course are found in the related section of the Program Policies and Procedures for Secondary Career and Technical Programs.

Applications for these endorsements should be made to the Deputy Director for Career and Technical Education, Arkansas Department of Workforce Education. Following documentation of the completion of individual requirements, a recommendation will be made to the Department of Education Teacher Licensure section to add related endorsements.

a. CAREER ACADEMY ENDORSEMENT (JOB CODE 9006)

Keystone

Capstone

b. CAREER ORENTIATION ENDORSEMENT (JOB CODE 9051)

Career Orientation (Adolescents and Young Adults 7-12 or (M. C. E. A 4-8)

c. CAREER PREPARATION (JOB CODE 9042)

Workforce Education Internship

Workplace Readiness

Workforce Technology

General Cooperative Education

d. CAREER SERVICES FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS (JOB CODE 9040)

Coordinated Career Education

Coordinated Compensatory Vocational Education

Jobs For Arkansas' Graduates

PROVE (Providing Real Opportunities for Vocational Education)

e. INTEGRATED ACADEMICS ENDORSEMENT (JOB CODE 6541)

Principles of Technology

f. CAREER AND TECHNICAL ADMINISTRATOR (JOB CODE 1020)

g. CAREER AND TECHNICAL SUPERVISOR (JOB CODE 9001)

3. Professional and Technical Permit Areas

Experienced professionals with appropriate State or National certification (where available) from their respective professions may receive a Professional and Technical Initial Permit after completion of the following:

Application for Teacher Licensure (Professional Permit Area) All appropriate background checks

Praxis I

(The above are to be submitted to the Arkansas Department of Education)

And

Summary of Applicants work history in Resume form

(Submitted to the Deputy Director for Career and Technical Education with a copy of the application submitted to ADE)

Initial Permits will be valid for not less than one year but not more than two years. Initial Permit holders must complete the following within two years:

Verification of High School Diploma or General Education Equivalency Professional Assessment (identified by the Department of Workforce Education)

Identified Course Requirements or Training

Upon completion of all above requirements the Professional will be issued a standard Professional and Technical Permit. Renewal is based upon a five-year-cycle, during which all educators are required to accrue 30 professional development hours per year.

Permit Areas

Job code Area

567 Automotive Collision Repair

9567

568 Automotive Service Technology

9568

569 Aviation Mechanics

9569

570 Construction Technology

9570

571 Advertising Design

9571

572 Microcomputer Systems Technology

9572

573 Cosmetology

9573

574 Diesel Mechanics

9574

575 Drafting and Design

9575

576 Dry-cleaning Laundry

9576

577 Electronics

9577

578 Heating Vent A/C

9578

579 Exploring Industrial Technology Education

9579

580 Culinary Arts and Chef preparation

9580

581 Furniture/Cabinet Making

9581

582 Graphic Communication

9582

583 Industrial Control Technology

9583

584 Industrial Cooperative Training

9584

585 Industrial Equipment Maintenance

9585

586 Instrumentation

9586

587 Machine Tool Technology

9587

588 Major Appliance Repair

9588

589 Meat Processing

9589

590 Piano Tuning

9590

591 Radio and Television Broadcasting

9591

592 Robotics

9592

593 Small Engine Repair

9593

594 Surveying

9594

595 Television Broadcasting

9595

596 Textiles

9596

597 Welding

9597

598 Food Production Management and Services

9598

599 Exploratory Trades and Industry

9599

600 Cashier/Checker Instruction

9600

601 Truck Driving

9601

602 Commercial Photography

9602

603 Criminal Justice

9603

604 Horticulture

9604

605 Forestry

9605

606 Engineering Professions

9606

607 Geographic Information Systems

9607

608 Marine Mechanics

9608

609 Pulp and Paper Science

9609

610 Child Care

9610

611 Medical Professions

9611

M. PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT

1. In-service training will be conducted for all vocational teachers.

2. Local administrators have the option of utilizing the vocational in-service training as a part of the school's staff development plan (required by the Standards) and may determine the attendance policy of vocational faculty at in-service activities.

N. PILOT AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS

1. Special projects designed for the purpose of implementing new and innovative instructional programs may require flexibility of certain policies and procedures.

2. Requests for projects of this nature require submission of a proposal to be approved by the Deputy Director for Career and Technical Education.

3. These projects may be funded from new program startup and funds may be used for salary, benefits, contracted services, supplies, or equipment.

O. SECONDARY SLOT-INS AT POSTSECONDARY INSTITUTIONS

1. Occupational-specific programs at technical institutes, community colleges, or two-year colleges in which high school students are admitted (slot-ins) shall count toward meeting the state standards relating to the requirement for three units each of three occupation-specific career and technical programs.

2. A copy of the written contract (agreement) with the postsecondary institution must be submitted to the Deputy Director for Career and Technical Education by October 1 of each academic year.

P. SHORT-TERM OCCUPATIONAL-SPECIFIC COURSES

Occupational-specific courses have paid employment in specific occupations or short-term specialization as their objective. The courses combine related classroom training with hands-on skill training in a specific selected occupational area. An example of such a program is Cashier-Checker Training, Engineering Robotics, or CISCO. These are course approvals only and not a part of a sequence of study. Approval is by submission of frameworks to the Deputy Director for Career and Technical Education. These courses are ineligible for state improvement funds and do not have student organization or other occupational requirements.

Q. SPECIAL POPULATIONS - SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS

1. Definitions and policies related to serving students who are members of "special populations" (special needs) must be in compliance with the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 (Public Law 105.332) or its successor.

2. The term "special populations" includes individuals with disabilities, educationally and economically disadvantaged individuals (including foster children), individuals of limited English proficiency, individuals who participate in programs designed to eliminate sex bias, and individuals in correctional institutions.

3. Each student identified as disabled and/or handicapped under the guidelines of the Special Education Section of the Arkansas Department of Education and admitted to career and technical education program(s) must have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) developed prior to placement in the program.

4. Each student who meets the criteria for identification as a member of special populations shall be provided with the vocational assessment, guidance, counseling and career development, in order to ensure his/her success in the career focus program of study.

5. Transition services as well as supplemental/support services shall be provided as needed to assist the student in making the transition from school to employment.

R. STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS

1. Curriculum grades 5-8

Career and Technical Education is required to be offered to all students as an integral part of the 5-8 curriculums. Courses necessary to meet the 5-8 requirements of the STANDARDS FOR ACCREDITATION OF ARKANSAS PUBLIC SCHOOLS revised January 10, 2000, are Career Orientation offered on the eighth grade level, Keyboarding and Computer Technology: Introduction offered on the seventh or eighth grade level. Neither federal Perkins funds nor state start up funds may be spent below grade seven (7). Schools who have students entering the seventh grade believed to be competent in the state keyboarding frameworks may request from the Department of Workforce Education an end of course test to verify that the student is proficient. Students who successfully pass this test will be considered competent without seat time. Schools may also substitute Word Processing I or Computer Business Applications for Computer Technology: Introduction. If these courses are offered as substitutions the course should be offered to all students. Schools must notify the Department of Workforce Education of this substitution.

2. Curriculum grades 9-12

Arkansas public schools are required to offer nine units of Career and Technical Education (eight must be taught each year).

3. To meet State Standards for Accreditation, public schools shall provide students access to a minimum of one career focus program of study in three different occupational programs. These technical programs must be offered annually from the following list:

Agricultural Science & Technology

Business Technology

Family and Consumer Sciences

Medical Professions

Marketing Technology

Technical and Professional Education

Work-Based Learning-Youth Apprenticeship or Internship

Schools who do not offer these programs on campus may utilize:

a. public schools,

b. vocational centers, or

c. postsecondary institutions.

If occupational programs are offered off-site to fulfill the required three (3) occupational programs the school must provide students transportation, sufficient time to complete a three-unit program of study, and sufficient effort to provide these opportunities to students.

An example of sufficient effort would be providing these opportunities to a number of students equal to the average class size of other vocational or elective classes.

If class size is not achieved, schools should provide other activities to show effort. Some examples could be:

a. list opportunities in all student publications,

b. provide time for outside recruitment, or

c. class visits to the off-site classes.

4. Secondary schools utilizing off-campus options as a means for meeting curricula standards must have on file with the Deputy Director for Career and Technical Education a written agreement between both institutions as documentation to this effect before October 1 of each academic year.

S. STUDENT COMPETENCY TESTING

Program Description

Student Competency Testing is necessary to provide documentation for indicators of the Arkansas State Plan for the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998. The act requires states to develop an accountability system that includes performance measures and standards for secondary and postsecondary career and technical education programs. The Arkansas system measures the learning and competency attainment, which includes student progress in the achievement of basic and more advanced academic skills. A real strength of the Arkansas system of accountability is the emphasis on student outcomes as the focus for evaluation and planning.

The measures and standards used in the Arkansas Student Competency Testing system are a direct result of the Arkansas Frameworks. The information generated by the accountability system is accessible by all persons interested in educational policy and performance.

T. TEXTBOOKS

Textbook information may be obtained from the Arkansas Department of Education guidelines for use of textbook funds.

U. TRAVEL

1. Out-of-district (personnel development/in-service activities) travel reimbursement may be made from federal Carl Perkins funds or local school district funds.

2. Approved secondary vocational directors, supervisors, and teacher/coordinators of approved career and technical programs requiring in-district travel shall be reimbursed by the local school district for travel associated with administration/supervision of the program.

3. Administrators, supervisors, teachers, and coordinators using private vehicles shall be reimbursed by the school for travel at the rate determined for other school personnel.

V. WORKFORCE EQUITY

The Department of Workforce Education will continue to inform school administrators of current policies regarding gender equity, discrimination and nontraditional training with the intention that these policies will be infused into the local curriculum and instruction.

W. WORKFORCE PERSONNEL (ADMINISTRATION)

1. Secondary Director, Vocational Education Certification Standards (approved by the State Board of Vocational Education - September 21, 1992)

a. Specialization Requirements

(1) Shall hold a current Arkansas teaching certificate.

(2) Shall possess a Master's degree from an accredited institution.

(3) Shall have completed 15 graduate level semester credit hours beyond the masters degree in school administration, supervision, management, and/or career and technical education.

(4) Shall have a minimum of three semester credit hours in career and technical education.

(5) Shall have a minimum of two years educational, supervisory, or managerial experience.

(6) Shall complete all DWE Supervisor Training requirements.

2. Secondary Supervisor, Career and Technical Education

Qualification Standards

A. The secondary supervisor shall have a bachelor's degree and shall hold a valid teaching certificate in the vocational discipline in which teachers will be supervised. Additionally, a minimum of three years of successful teaching experience in the vocational discipline for which instructional programs are to be supervised is required.

B. Shall complete all DWE Supervisor Training requirements

X. CAREER FOCUS PROGRAMS OF STUDY

1. The core curricula pursuant to Acts 977 and 1108 of 1997 is required of all students.

2. Career Focus Programs of Study make up the vocational delivery system in the areas of Agricultural Science and Technology, Business and Marketing Technology, Family and Consumer Sciences, General Cooperative Education, Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps, Medical Professions Education, and Technical and Professional Education.

3. Each career focus program of study shall consist of foundation courses in Career Orientation, Computer Technology, and Keyboarding. A minimum of three (3) Carnegie units in grades 9-12, a career focus is required for a program of study in workforce education. Examples of planned, sequential programs of study for the various career clusters are included in this document.

4. Schools that, due to local business and industry requirements or school improvement plans, find it necessary to modify career focus programs of study to meet the needs of the students by improving completion and placement may request a local modification of the state program of study.

a. The request should document need and expected outcomes.

b. It should have input from postsecondary and industry representation.

c. It should be submitted to the Deputy Director of Career and Technical Education.

d. It should not be initiated until written approval is received.

Y. CAREER AND TECHNICAL STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

1. The career and technical student organization shall be an integral part of the career and technical education program(s) offered in each school and shall follow the applicable guidelines, goals, objectives, and shall participate in activities of the appropriate state and/or national student organization for each program.

2. A career and technical student organization for Career Orientation shall be optional.

3. Career and technical student organizations will be supervised by vocational personnel in the applicable occupational area.

IV. SPECIFIC CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM POLICIES

The following pages describe the specific occupational program policies and provide information regarding the career focus programs of study and level of courses that may be approved.

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

Program Description

Agricultural Science and Technology Education is an organized educational program designed to provide career exploration and technical preparation for students who are interested in agriculture. The knowledge and performance skills required for successful achievements and/or advancement in agricultural occupations constitute the central focus of the program. This program seeks to broaden traditional agricultural education to include agricultural literacy, reinforcement of applied instruction, agricultural business and industry needs, and preparation for further education.

Teacher Qualifications

710.00 Secondary Agriculture Education Licensure

Arkansas Department of Education Licensure section will provide current rules and regulations

Instructional Program

The Agricultural Education Program offers sequential career focus programs of study in the following areas:

Agricultural Business

Agricultural Mechanics

Agricultural Science

Horticulture

Natural Resource

Each local education agency should plan a program(s) of study to meet the needs of students in the community. Each teacher unit shall offer a minimum of four (4) semester courses per year from the selected program of studies other than the Ag Mechanics program of study. Additional courses may be selected from both technical and agriculture courses.

Specialized programs of study may be offered upon approval by the program manager.

A. The total program should include one or both of the following foundation courses:

1. Introduction to World Agri Science: A one semester Ag literacy course offered at the seventh or eighth grade level designed to introduce students to agriculture and its economic importance, explain the food and fiber system, and explore careers available.

2. Agricultural Science and Technology: A two-semester foundation course for all agricultural education courses which includes basic animal, soil and plant science, an introduction to agriculture mechanics, FFA, Supervised Agriculture Experience Programs, and leadership.

B. Agriculture Cooperative Program

Cooperative courses combine classroom instruction with on-the job training in agriculture occupations related to the student's career goal. Training plans are developed by the teacher and training sponsor (employer) to insure that required competencies are met. Students are paid and given academic credit.

C. Supervised Agricultural Experience Program

A Supervised Agricultural Experience Program (SAEP) is required for each student enrolled in an Agriculture Education course. Refer to the SAEP Guide for complete instructions and a description of each SAEP program area.

D. Curriculum/Content Frameworks

Each teacher shall follow State curriculum/content frameworks for each course approved by the Department.

Facilities and Equipment

Facility and equipment requirements may be obtained from the Agricultural Education Section and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

The career and technical student organization, Future Farmers of America (FFA), shall be an integral part of the Agriculture Education instructional program and shall follow the applicable guidelines, goals, objectives, and participate in activities of the state and National FFA Organization.

RELATED LINK:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/agriculture.html

BUSINESS/MARKETING TECHNOLOGY

BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY

Program Description

Business Technology programs are designed to prepare individuals to perform managerial, research and technical support functions related to production, buying as well as selling goods and services

Technical support functions include word processing and data entry skills using the latest in modern business equipment, communication, and accounting skills. Business information processing includes the skills to process and retrieve internal business information and to respond to external data requests. Enterprise management prepares individuals to develop, own, and operate businesses including the applications of doing business in international markets and finance.

Teacher Qualifications

720.00 Business Education Licensure

Arkansas Department of Education Licensure section will provide current rules and regulations

Instructional Program

Business Technology has five career focus programs of study from which students may choose. Specific courses are required for each of the programs of study; in addition, various options may be selected to complete the required curriculum.

A. Career Focuses

The program framework for secondary education and training is designed for linkage/articulation to postsecondary programs of study. All curriculums adhere to the workforce training requirements for increased levels of technical skills and stronger foundations in applied academics. Program offerings in each school must include a minimum of one (1) career focus/program of study.

Business Technology offers the following career focuses programs of study:

Business Administration

(Office Management, Management, Human Resource Management, or Business Law)

Hospitality and Tourism

(Hospitality or Lodging Management core)

Information Management

(Desktop Publishing, Multimedia Applications, or Programming core)

Finance

(Banking & Finance or Accounting core)

Marketing

B. Length of Courses and Eligibility of Students

Length of courses and eligibility of students are shown on the Business/Marketing Technology Program framework and course offerings immediately following.

C. Curriculum/Content Frameworks

Each teacher shall follow curriculum/content frameworks for each course approved by the Department. Prerequisites are listed in each course framework.

D. Course Credits for Cooperative Office Education (COE)

It is recommended that three credits per year be given to cooperative education completers (one credit for the related class and two credits for on-the-job training).

E. Foundation Core or Prerequisite Courses

If taken at the high school level (grades 9-12), the foundation core courses may apply toward the three units required for a career focus program of study.

Facilities and Equipment

Facility and equipment requirements may be obtained from the Business/Marketing Technology Office and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organizations

The career and technical student organization Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) shall be an integral part of the Business Technology instructional program and shall follow the guidelines, goals, objectives, and shall participate in activities of the state and national organization.

RELATED LINK: http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/BusinessMarketing.htm

MARKETING TECHNOLOGY

Program Description

Marketing Technology provides instruction that prepares individuals to plan and execute, at the operational or direct sales level, the promotion and distribution of ideas, goods and services in order to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives. Marketing tasks will include segments of the apparel and fashion industry, retailing of food, real estate, tourism, vehicle and petroleum operations, as well as developing business enterprises.

Teacher Qualifications

Secondary Marketing Education Licensure

Arkansas Department of Education Licensure section will provide current rules and regulations

Instructional Programs of Study

One career focus program of study is provided for Marketing students, but several options are available as individual drawing boards are developed. The two two-semester capstone courses are Marketing and Marketing Management. In addition to the core marketing courses, related classes may be selected from those listed below under Optional Courses.

The career focus program of study for Marketing Technology is based on three broad competency areas that are essential for success in any marketing occupation: Economic Fundamentals of Marketing; Human Resource Foundation; Marketing and Business Foundations.

A. Program Framework

1. Marketing and Marketing Management

These two sequential courses are designed to give a good foundation for all students to explore and gain skills and knowledge in the occupational field of marketing and management. School-based instruction is provided for all students. For those students who desire work experience as a part of their educational program, a cooperative component is available. It is not required for all students, but is desirable for many of them.

Cooperative education combines classroom instruction with alternating periods of on-the-job training in Marketing occupations related to the student's career goal. Training sponsors are selected to coordinate the learning experiences provided on the job. Training plans are developed cooperatively by the teacher/coordinator and the training sponsor to insure the development of required competencies.

2. Optional Courses

These courses may be offered in any Marketing Education program such as:

Advertising, Desktop Publishing, Enterprise Management, Fashion Merchandising, International Business, Retailing, Salesmanship, Hospitality and Tourism, or Lodging Management courses. Courses may combine classroom instruction with supervised laboratory activities designed to help the student achieve his or her career goal. The laboratory experiences may include marketing simulations, operation of a school store, motel, boutique, parts warehouse, or a student bank within the educational institution.

B. Length of Program

1. Marketing and Marketing Management shall both be one-year courses.

2. Optional courses may be offered on a one or two-semester basis.

3. Short-Term courses shall be one semester or less.

C. Eligibility of Students

1. Marketing is available for Grades 11-12.

2. Marketing Management is available for Grade 12.

3. Optional courses are available for Grades 10-12.

4. Cooperative students must be 16 years of age to meet labor law requirements.

5. Students must have an occupational objective in the field of marketing.

6. If possible, cooperative students should be placed in an approved Marketing Technology training station before school starts.

D. Curriculum/Content Framework

Each teacher shall follow the State curriculum/content framework for each course approved by the Department.

E. Course Credit

Recommendations: It is recommended that three credits per year be given to program completers (one credit for the related class and two for on-the-job training). On-the-job training shall be 270 hours per semester.

Facilities and Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be secured from the Business/Marketing Technology Office and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

The student organization DECA, an Association of Marketing Students, shall be an integral part of the Marketing Technology program and shall follow the same guidelines, goals, objectives, and shall participate in activities of the Arkansas Association and the National DECA Organization.

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES EDUCATION

Program Description

Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) programs are designed to prepare individuals for the occupation of homemaking, as well as to prepare individuals to function effectively at home and in the market place, to attain the skills necessary for entry level positions in FACS occupational areas, and to provide the basic educational foundation for entry into a baccalaureate program to prepare for a professional specialty, such as FACS education, dietetics, food sciences, interior design, fashion design, textile science, individual and family development, consumer sciences, resource management, living environments, research and others.

Teacher Qualifications

Vocational Home Economics Licensure

Arkansas Department of Education Licensure section will provide current rules and regulations

Instructional Programs

Family and Consumer Sciences Education consists of two types of courses:

1. FACS courses that provide instructional programs, services, and activities designed to prepare youth and adults for family life and careers in family and consumer sciences.

2. Occupational FACS courses which are designed to assist students in the development of skills which will enable them to secure employment and advance in a chosen family and consumer sciences career.

A. Career Focus Programs of Study

Program offerings in each school should include at least one (1) career focus program of study. Most schools offer a FACS program of study/career focuses at this time. Those schools that have occupational FACS courses will be able to offer a second program of study.

The career focus programs of study include:

Child Care Guidance, Management and Services

Food Production, Management and Services

Facilities Management, Maintenance and Services

Family and Consumer Sciences Education

B. Foundation Course

Family and Consumer Sciences career focus programs of study requires that the foundation course of .5 unit family and Work Connections (grades 7-8) or 1 unit Family Dynamics (grades 9-12) be offered to all students for completion of a program of study.

To allow schools more flexibility, the foundation courses may be taken in grades 7-8. However, if taken at the high school level, the foundation courses may apply toward the three units required in the workforce education career focus program of study.

C. Length of Course and Eligibility of Students

Length of courses and eligibility of students are shown on the FACS education framework at the end of this section.

D. Curriculum/Content Frameworks

Each teacher shall follow state curriculum/content framework for each course approved by the Department.

E. Course Credit for Cooperative Education

It is recommended that three units of credit per year be given to cooperative program completers (one unit for the related class and two units for the 270 per semester/540 per year hours of on-the-job training required).

Facilities and Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be obtained from the FACS Section of the Department and must be met within the specific time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organizations

The career and technical student organizations, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), shall be an integral part of the FACS instructional program. All local chapters shall follow the guidelines, goals, objectives, and participate in activities of the state and national organization.

TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

Program Description

Technical and Professional_Education is a group of instructional programs that prepare individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills in one or more trade, technical and/or professional occupation. Students will engage in activities and instruction enabling them to use, create, and problem solve and control various technology resources: people, tools, machines, information, materials, energy, capital and time.

Teacher Qualifications

A. A minimum of a high school diploma or its equivalent plus five year's work experience in the specialty area in which the teacher will be teaching; or two year's recent work experience in the specialty area to be taught. Submit a passing score in the specialty area to be taught on the National Occupational Competency Test (NOCTI) or a nationally recognized certification assessment approved by the Department of Workforce Education. Submit a passing score for the Praxis I exam (will be effective January 1, 2002). Minimum education requirements/work experience shall be met prior to employment in the teaching specialty.

B. Nine credit hours of vocational teacher education courses or 135 clock hours. These hours must be obtained at a rate of 90 clock hours or six semester hours per school year until all deficiencies are removed. Examples of these courses include:

1. *Organization and Management

2. *Methods of Teaching

3. *Program/Curriculum Design and Development in Trade and Industrial Education

4. SkillsUSA Chapter Management Institute (required of all instructors). SkillsUSA Chapter Management will be offered in a concentrated session annually. Applicants who chose this option to fulfill number 5 will be required to complete nine hours in addition to the concentrated session.

5. Cooperative/Internship Education (required of ICT teachers)

*Upon evaluation by the PBTE teacher educators, designated PBTE (Performance Based Teacher Education) modules may suffice for these requirements.

A vocational permit will be issued upon completion of all requirements in A and B.

C. One-Year Provisional Certificate (Renewable)

1. Trade/Technical and/or Professional areas may be issued to allow time for administering the NOCTI.

2. To allow completion of the vocational teacher education hours requirements

3. One-Year Provisional Certificate: renewable one time; application for renewal is required prior to the expiration date

D. Special Certification/Licensure Requirements

1. Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Technician

a. Meet the certification requirements for Trade and Industrial Education

b. Hold ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) Certification in the teaching specialty area(s)

2. Cosmetology

a. Meet the certification requirements for Trade and Industrial Education

b. Licensed by the Arkansas State Board of Cosmetology (Licensure in Cosmetology may substitute for the NOCTI Examination.)

c. Hold a current Cosmetology Instructors License issued by the Arkansas State Board of Cosmetology

3. Industrial Cooperative Training (ICT)

a. Hold a bachelor's degree

b. Two years' of work experience in a trade, technical and/or industrial area

c. A minimum of 90 clock hours or nine credit hours in the vocational teacher education courses for Trade, Technical and Industrial Education teachers

4. Industrial Technology Education

a. Must hold a teaching certificate in Industrial/Technology Education /Arts or hold a bachelor's degree and be certified in another area

b. Two year's work experience in a trade, technical or industrial area

c. A minimum of 90 170 clock hours or nine twelve credit hours in vocational teacher education courses required (six hours of the vocational teacher education courses must related specifically to Industrial Technology.)

5. Exploratory Trade and Industrial Education

a. Exploratory T&l instructors shall meet certification requirements of ICT Coordinators, Industrial Technology Education Instructors or Trade and Industrial Education Instructors

b. Industrial Education Certification for new teachers is preferred

6. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

a. Must hold a bachelor's degree in a related area or be certified in another area

b. Must complete the required in-service training for the specific area

c. Must complete the SkillsUSA Chapter Management Institute

7. Project Lead the Way Pre-Engineering (PLTW)

a. Must hold a bachelor's degree and be certified in another area

b. Must complete the required in-service training for the specific area

c. Must complete the SkillsUSA Chapter Management Institute

E. Certification Renewal - Non-Compliance with Act 350 of 1985 as amended by Act 512 of 1987

To renew a Technical and Professional_certificate (Vocational Permit), if not in compliance with Act 350 of 1985 as amended by Act 512 of 1987, teacher shall be required to take a minimum of six college credit hours or 90 clock hours relating to the specific discipline-i.e. mathematics, reading, writing-shall be required for each test area that the teacher failed to pass. For example, if the deficiency was the written portion of the AESA, coursework in a basic English and/or a basic written communications class would be required. These hours may be obtained and documented through a public school, a college or university, a postsecondary vocational technical school, a secondary vocational center, an adult education class, etc.

Additionally, all other requirements for a Technical and Professional Teaching Certificate (Vocational Permit) shall be met.

Instructional Programs

A. Programs of Study

Advertising Design

Furniture Manufacturing

Automotive Service Technology

Geographic Information Systems

Aviation Technology

Graphic Communications

Collision Repair Technology

Industrial Equipment Maintenance

Commercial Photography

Laundry & Cleaning Services

Computer Systems Technology

Machine Tool

Construction Technology

Major Appliance Repair

Cosmetology

Medical Professions Education

Criminal Justice

Power Equipment Technology

Diesel Mechanics

Pre-Engineering

Drafting and Design

Radio/TV Broadcasting

Electronics

Welding

B. Curriculum/Content Frameworks

Each Technical and Professional teacher shall follow the State curriculum/content frameworks for each course approved by the Department.

Facilities and Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be secured from the Technical and Professional Section and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

The appropriate student organization, SkillsUSA - VICA or the Technology Student Association (TSA), shall be an integral part of each instructional program respectively and shall follow the same guidelines, goals, objectives, and participate in activities of the Arkansas State Chapter and the respective National Organization.

MEDICAL PROFESSIONS EDUCATION

Program Description

Medical Professions Education programs are designed to assist students in gaining the skills and knowledge needed to become contributing members of the health career community. The program is designed to provide completers with entry-level employment skills, initial mastery certification in a chosen health services career, and the opportunity to articulate with a postsecondary program leading to a higher level of mastery.

Teacher Qualification

The teacher must hold a bachelor's degree with a major related to health occupations and must have two years experience working in the health care system. Health occupations education majors, health education majors, and life science majors who completed the standard education block and student teaching at an approved institution of higher education may substitute an internship for the two years of work experience. This internship must be served in an accredited hospital plus partial time in a physician's and/or dentist's clinic. This internship must be approved by a school superintendent, the supervisor of Medical Professions Education of the Department of Workforce Education and an official of the participating health facilities. The internship shall be at least 180 clock hours in length and must be completed before the second year of employment.

Instructional Programs

The program design and the program framework for Medical Professions Education have been revised in response to current education initiatives.

All start-up programs must follow the framework. Programs will be known as Medical Professions Education programs.

A. Programs of Study

Medical Professional Education includes common core courses that are basic to all medical professions. Specialization experiences are designated to meet career objectives of students enrolled. Specific career focus programs of study are determined by these objectives. Examples of programs of study that may be offered include:

Dental Assisting

Medical Assisting

Medical Records Clerk

Nursing Assistant/Geriatric Aide

Physical Therapy Aide

Medical Professions, Other (Physicians, Dentists, Nurses, Therapists, etc.)

B. Length of Course

Length of courses is shown at the end of the Medical Professions Education section of these policies.

C. Eligibility of Students

Eligibility of students is shown at the end of the Medical Professions Education Section of these policies.

D. Curriculum/Content Frameworks

Each teacher shall follow State curriculum/content frameworks for each course approved by the Department of Workforce Education.

Facilities and Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be secured from the Medical Professions Education Section and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

The career and technical student organization shall be Health Occupation Students of America (HOSA). This organization shall be an integral part of Medical Professions instructional courses and shall follow the same guidelines, goals, objectives, and participate in activities of the Arkansas State Chapter and the National HOSA organizations.

RELATED LINK:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/hosa.html

CAREER ORIENTATION

Program Description

Career Orientation is a one or two semester course. It may be offered in the seventh or eighth grade (eighth grade recommended) for a minimum of one semester (two consecutive nine-week periods in either the first or second semester) and a maximum of two semesters.

Teacher Qualification

Career Orientation teachers who are not certified counselors must have a valid secondary or middle school teaching license. In addition to the licensing requirements, completion of the following courses are required for Career Orientation endorsement:

A. Three semester hours of "Methods of Teaching Career Orientation".

B. Three semester hours of "Hands-on Activities for Career Orientation".

Teachers who are deficient in the above qualifications must obtain these hours at the rate of six hours per year until all deficiencies have been removed.

Counselors who teach Career Orientation must meet state licensing standards_and must have completed three semester hours of "Hands-on Activities for Career Orientation" prior to teaching Career Orientation a second year.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type and Content

Career Orientation is an activity-based career exploration course designed to broaden students' knowledge about careers. The course will consist of instruction in the following areas:

(1) self-awareness,

(2) career awareness including the 16 U.S.O.E. career clusters,

(3) career planning, and

(4) employability skills. Students will receive occupational information from a balance of sources such as audio/visual aids, computer software, resource speakers, field trips, job shadows, lectures, and applied activities. At the completion of the course, the student will develop a tentative career action plan.

B. Length of Course

The Career Orientation course may be one or two semesters.

C. Course Credit

One-half unit credit for a semester course and one unit credit for a two semester course should be given Career Orientation students.

Facilities and Equipment

Facility and equipment requirements may be obtained from the Career Orientation Section or from the ADWE website: www.work-ed.state.ar.us and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

A career and technical student organization for Career Orientation is optional.

RELATED LINK:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CareerOrientation.html

GENERAL COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

Work-Based Learning)

Program Description

General Cooperative Education (GCE) combines classroom instruction with work experience and on-the-job training related to a student's career goals. The following elements are essential parts of a General Cooperative Education program: on-the-job training, related instruction, training agreements, written learning objectives, screening of students, paid employment, and performance assessment.

Teacher Qualifications

A. Education

The General Cooperative Education coordinator must have an integrated career and technical education license. In addition, the General Cooperative Education coordinator must have completed the Career Preparation endorsement_sponsored by the Department of Workforce Education.

B. Work Experience

A General Cooperative Education coordinator shall have a minimum of 2,000 hours of paid work experience other than teaching.

Instructional Program

A. Programs of Study and Length

General Cooperative Education is designed as a one-year program to provide classroom and work-based learning related to the student's career focus as indicated on the individualized program of study.

B. Eligibility of Students

1. GCE participants must be 16 years of age in order to meet labor law requirements.

2. All students enrolled in General Cooperative Education must be employed and compensated, and placed in an approved training station prior to the starting of class. An approved training station must relate to the student's career focus.

C. Course Content

The GCE related class includes instruction in workplace competencies consisting of employability skills, positive work attitudes, and skills identified in the Scans 2000 Report.

D. Course Credit for Cooperative Education

It is recommended that two credits per year be given to cooperative program completers (one credit for the related class and one credit for on-the-job training). Exception: When GCE is taught on block scheduling, two credits may be given for the related class and one credit for on-the-job training so that coordinators can have students in class all year.

Facilities and Equipment

Facility and equipment requirements may be obtained from the General Cooperative Education Section (or from the ADWE website: www.work-ed.state.ar.us) and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

The career and technical student organization, General Cooperative Education Clubs shall be an integral part of the instructional program.

RELATED LINK:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/GCE/indexgce.html

GENERAL COOPERATIVE EDUCATION (GCE)

Work-Based Learning)

Course Offerings by Grade Levels and Semester Options

11th or 12th Grade (Recommend 12th)

General Cooperative Education

(Classroom Related of .5 unit Workplace Readiness)

General Cooperative Education

(Work Experience: 1 unit)

WORKFORCE EDUCATION INTERNSHIP

Program Description

Workforce Education Internship programs are designed to assist students in their specific career focus areas and to help them successfully transition from school-to-career. Students who expect to begin their careers immediately upon high school graduation as well as those who need to complete post-secondary training prior to starting a career can benefit from the program. The structure involves a strong business partnership that links the program and its participants to current resources, information, and guidance from industry professionals. It provides intense, competency based classroom and work-site instruction specifically tailored to meet the needs of individual students. It also fosters articulation of programs between high schools and post-secondary, credit-granting institutions and apprenticeship programs. A post-graduation monitoring system is incorporated that identifies and addresses graduates' ongoing needs as they advance toward their identified career goals.

Teacher Qualifications

A. Education - the Workforce Education Internship coordinator shall have an integrated Career and Technical Education License.

B. Internship Endorsement - prior to instructing and managing the Internship program, the Internship coordinator must complete program management training (Career Preparation endorsement)_developed and approved by the Department of Workforce Education.

C. Work Experience - a Workforce Education Internship coordinator shall have a minimum of 2,000 hours of paid work experience other than teaching.

D. In-service Requirements - In order to maintain program approval, Internship coordinators are expected to attend semiannual in-service training sessions sponsored by the Department of Workforce Education.

The Internship coordinator should be employed on a contract with the school district for a minimum of 220 days.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type

1. Workforce Education Internship is a program designed to serve eleventh and twelfth grade students who are in good academic standing and are enrolled in their third unit within a chosen career focus area. The entire program, which includes both classroom and work-site instruction, focuses on assisting students to successfully transition from school to work.

Interns receive guided classroom and guided work-site instruction that is competency based and incorporates academics and applied learning activities. Each classroom and work-site competency that an intern successfully completes is documented and placed in a portfolio. The intern receives the portfolio upon completion of the Internship Program.

Classroom Instruction - The classroom portion of the Internship program focuses on teaching students the basic skills required by all employers. Interns are individually assessed and weak areas are addressed while strong areas are reinforced.

Work-site Instruction - Individual work-sites must be approved by the Internship Coordinator. Written agreements must be established between the school and the work-site that outlines appropriate program delivery prior to student placement. Work-site instruction is guided by the employer and directly relates to the student's identified career focus. Compensation is negotiated for each intern and based on fair labor standards.

2. A Workforce Education Internship can be utilized in any program of study as a related option.

B. Length of Course

1. Students shall complete between 180 hours and 720 hours of instruction.

2. Maximum length of enrollment in the Internship program shall be two consecutive years.

3. Length of course shall be determined by the needs of the individual student. A specific plan shall be established for each intern that outlines the interns planned experiences and expectations as they directly relate to her/his_chosen career focus area.

C. Eligibility of Students

1. Students must be 16 years of age in order to meet labor law requirements.

2. Students shall apply for acceptance to the Internship program. Minimum guidelines for acceptance include:

a. An identified career focus on file;

b. Enrolled in third unit of an identified career major;

c. Academic standing of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale;

d. Acceptable attendance record as determined by the school administration;

e. Written recommendations from a counselor, a teacher in the student's career major area, a teacher outside the student's career major, and two personal references from non-relatives.

f. Membership in a student organization that reflects the intern's career goals and enhances the intern's ability to excel in her/his chosen career focus area.

D. Curriculum/Content Framework

Internship program coordinators shall follow the State curriculum/content framework as approved by the Department of Workforce Education.

E. Course Credits

1. Interns should be expected to complete at least 18 hours of coordinator contact hours and 180 hours of worksite study in order to receive 1 credit.

2. Interns should receive 1 credit for each additional 18 hours of Coordinator contact and 180 hours of internship study completed up to a maximum of 4 credits for completing 72 hours of Coordinator contact and 720 hours worksite study within a consecutive two-year period.

STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Although a specific student organization does not exit for interns, the Internship Program is designed to support the guidelines, goals, and objectives of all student organizations. Interns are required to hold membership in the student organization that represents their individual career focus area. The Internship Program provides leadership instruction and training and may assist students in preparing for competitions and activities associated with their particular student organization.

KEYSTONE

Program Description

Keystone Programs are designed to help ninth grade students' make smooth transitions from middle schools to high schools. The program is customized by faculty members to meet the needs of individual project sites.

Keystone has several purposes that include:

* Decreasing the number of disciplinary referrals

* Lowering drop-out rates

* Raising test scores

* Increasing student involvement in school activities, clubs, and community service

* Increasing student enrollment in higher level academic course work and/or skills attainment

* Promoting sound career development planning

Minimum activities required are:

* An orientation process that introduces students to the school's offerings, faculty, activities, clubs, rules and regulations.

* Career exploration that builds on the students' Career Orientation experience and incorporates:

* Job Shadowing

* Mentoring

* Career/College Fair

* Guest Speakers

* Supervised Field Trips to Business and Industry Sites

* Parent/Student Educational/Career Development Conferences

* Continuation of 4-6 year academic/career planning process

Although Keystone programs originated as an orientation program for schools implementing Academies, they may be adapted for use in regular high school settings.

Teacher Qualifications

It is the school administrator's responsibility to assemble a team of visionaries to design the program. The team shall include qualified counselor(s), administrators and both academic and career and technical certified teachers. The goal of the team shall be to establish the local guidelines and content for the Keystone program. A minimum of ten people shall serve on the team.

Endorsement Requirements - The Department of Workforce Education shall endorse all team members as Keystone teacher/advisors. To attain endorsement, each team member must attend a five-day Vision Retreat during which time he/she will provide documentation of 40 hours of group participation in the development of a local plan. The plan must be submitted to the Department and address the following topics:

* Establish the mission/goals for the program

* Establish the non-negotiable components

* Outline the orientation program

* Outline the career exploration component

* Define the workplace skills to be taught

* Design how career planning will be incorporated

* Establish the framework

* Establish the time frame

* Select and/or design appropriate bell-to-bell activities/curriculum for the first ¼ of program

* Identify resources and support

* Establish monthly meeting schedule

* Establish schedule for career exploratory activities

* Establish a division of responsibilities for further curriculum/activity development

* Establish a follow-up method to record student data regarding improvement in areas of concern

* Establish a goal and method of recruiting and training teachers for the keystone program

* Establish a date and method for evaluating program

An annual retreat shall be held during which time the process shall be revisited. Newly recruited teachers will participate in evaluating and modifying the Keystone program along side of veteran team members. Newly recruited teachers will receive endorsement when the revised plan is submitted to the Department.

Instructional Program

A. Classroom Instruction - shall follow the plan submitted to the Department by the school.

B. Curriculum/Content Framework - Each Keystone program shall establish a framework as part of the plan submitted to the Department.

C. Length of Course (Based on plan submitted to the Department) -Minimum Length - One Semester

(Schools on Block Schedules can modify the length of time to conform to the school's schedule - modification should be reflected in the plan submitted to the Department)

D. Course Credits (Based on a standard schedule) Students shall receive .5 credit for completing a full-semester Keystone program.

WORKPLACE READINESS

Course Description

Workplace Readiness is a one-semester course offered in grades ten through twelve. It focuses on problem solving, teamwork, communications skills, the use of technology, and self-management.

Teacher Qualifications

Workplace Readiness instructors must have an integrated Career and Technical Education License. In addition, the instructor must have completed Career Preparation endorsement sponsored by the Department of Workforce Education.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type

Workplace Readiness is a course that teaches the skills and attributes needed to succeed in the changing workplace through video, computer, and print lessons. The course is divided into five units: resources, interpersonal skills, information, systems, and technology.

B. Eligibility of Student

Students in Workplace Readiness may be in grades ten through twelve.

C. Course Content

The course content is the Workplace Readiness framework approved by the Department of Workforce Education.

D. Course Credit

One-half unit credit for a semester course should be given Workplace Readiness students.

Facilities and Equipment

Facility and equipment requirements may be obtained from the Workplace Readiness Section or the Department website (www.work-ed.state.ar.us) and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

RELATED LINK:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/WorkplaceReadiness.html

WORKFORCE TECHNOLOGY

Course Description

Workforce Technology is a new one-year technology based course designed as a substitute for the traditional Workplace Readiness course. It is intended for students in grades ten through twelve. The course creates a link with East Lab technology and methodology and focuses on teaching students the transferable skills they need to succeed in the changing workplace.

Teacher Qualifications

A. Education - The Workforce Technology teacher is a facilitator. The person in this position must have a valid teaching license, completed required East Lab training, and completed specialized endorsement training through the Department of Education.

B. Endorsement Training - Prior to teaching Workforce Technology for the second year, teachers must complete a two-day training session designed by the Department of Workforce Education specifically for Workforce Technology and Workplace Readiness instructors.

C. In-service Requirements - Workforce Technology teachers shall complete a 27-day training sponsored by the East Lab. In addition, Workforce Technology teachers shall complete in-service training on a regular basis as determined by the Department of Workforce Education and East.

D. Non-certified teachers - Persons who do not have teacher's license may teach Workforce Technology. However, non-licensed teachers must complete the steps necessary to obtain the credentials to teach.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type

1. Workforce Technology employs a problem-based service learning environment that encourages students to use advanced technological applications, problem solving, team work, communication, and critical thinking skills. Real-world advanced application in programming, computer design, and animation are used to reinforce math skills. Oral and written communications skills are reinforced through presentations, projects and electronic communication. Work ethics and attitudes are strengthened as students take personal ownership of the lab and are responsible for software and equipment inventory, equipment maintenance, networking issues, and system administration.

2. Workforce Technology can be utilized in any program of study as a related option.

B. Length of Course

Workforce Technology may be implemented as a one-year course.

C. Eligibility of Students

Students in Workforce Technology shall meet East requirements.

D. Course Content

Course content shall meet East requirements.

E. Course Credits

It is recommended that the equivalent of one unit of credit be given to Workforce Technology students.

Facilities And Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be secured from the East Lab located at OUR Educational Cooperative in Harrison, AR. The Department of Workforce Education shall only be responsible for funding a designated portion of an East Lab facility. The amount of funding shall be based on a predetermined formula. The facilities and equipment requirements must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career And Technical Student Organization

Students enrolled in Workforce Technology are encouraged to hold membership in the student organization(s) that relate to their career focus area.

ARKANSAS CAREER OPPORTUNITIES GUIDELINES

The guidelines contained in this booklet have been established to provide consistency and ensure that all regional partnerships are in compliance with the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994. The Act can be viewed at http://www.stw.ed.gov/.

Regional Partnership Council Membership

Each regional partnership council must include employers, representatives of local educational agencies and local postsecondary educational institutions, local educators (such as teachers, counselors, administrators), representatives of labor organizations or non-managerial employee representatives, and students. Membership must consist of at least 51% business/industry (employers), and the other categories must have at least one representative.

A regional partnership may include other entities, such as: employer organizations; community-based organizations; national trade associations working at the local levels; industrial extension centers; rehabilitation agencies and organizations; registered apprenticeship agencies; local vocational education entities; proprietary institutions of higher education; local government agencies; parent organizations; teacher organizations; vocational student organizations; and private industry councils.

Required Program Contents

For the purpose of this document, a Career Opportunities program is defined as the Career Opportunities system developed and implemented by each regional partnership council.

A Career Opportunities program shall -

(1) integrate school-based learning and work-based learning, as provided for in sections 102 and 103 of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994, integrate academic and occupational learning, and establish effective linkages between secondary and postsecondary education;

(2) provide participating students with the opportunity to complete career focus;

(3) incorporate the program components provided in sections 102 through 104 of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994;

(4) provide participating student, to the extent practicable, with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of the industry the students are preparing to enter and;

(5) provide all students with equal access to the full range of such program components (including both school-based and work-based learning components) and related activities, such as recruitment, enrollment, and placement activities, except that nothing in the Act shall be construed to provide any individual with an entitlement to services under the Act.

School-based Learning Component

The school-based learning component of a Career Opportunities program shall include:

(1) career awareness and career exploration and counseling (beginning at the earliest possible age, but not later than the seventh grade) in order to help students who may be interested to identify, and select or reconsider, their interests, goals, and career focus, including those options that may not be traditional for their gender, race, or ethnicity;

(2) initial selection by interested students of a career focus not later than the beginning of the eleventh grade;

(3) a program of study designed to meet the same academic content standards the state has established for all students, and to meet the requirements necessary to prepare a student for postsecondary education and the requirements necessary for a student to earn a certificate of completion;

(4) a program of instruction and curriculum that integrates academic and vocational learning (including applied methodologies and team-teaching strategies), and incorporates instruction, to the extent practicable, in all aspects of an industry, tied to the career focus of a participant;

(5) regularly scheduled evaluations involving ongoing consultation and problem solving with students and school dropouts to identify their academic strengths and weaknesses, academic progress, workplace knowledge, goals, and the need for additional learning opportunities to master core academic and vocational skills; and

(6) procedures to facilitate the entry of students participating in a Career Opportunities program into additional training or postsecondary education programs, as well as to facilitate the transfer of the students between education and training programs.

Work-based Learning Component

The work-based learning component of a Career Opportunities program shall include:

(1) work experience;

(2) a planned program of job training and work experiences (including training related to pre-employment and employment skills to be mastered at progressively higher levels) that are coordinated with learning in the school-based learning component and are relevant to the career focus of students and lead to the award of certificates of completion;

(3) workplace mentoring;

(4) instruction in general workplace competencies, including instruction and activities related to developing positive work attitudes, and employability and participative skills; and

(5) broad instruction, to the extent practicable, in all aspects of an industry.

The work-based learning component may include such activities as paid work experience, job shadowing, school-sponsored enterprises, or on-the-job training.

Connecting Activities Component

The connecting activities component of a Career Opportunities program shall include:

(1) matching students with the work-based learning opportunities of employers;

(2) providing, with respect to each student, a school site mentor to act as a liaison among the student and the employer, school, teacher, school administrator, and parent of the student, and, if appropriate, other community partners;

(3) providing technical assistance and services to employers, including small-and medium-sized businesses, and other parties in -

(a) designing school-based learning components, work-based learning components, and counseling and case management services; and

(b) training teachers, workplace mentors, school site mentors, and counselors;

(4) providing assistance to schools and employers to integrate school-based and work-based learning, and integrate academic and occupational learning into the program;

(5) encouraging the active participation of employers, in cooperation with local education officials, in the implementation of local activities;

(6)

(a) providing assistance to participants who have completed the program in finding an appropriate job, continuing their education, or entering into an additional training program; and

(b) linking the participants with other community services that may be necessary to assure a successful transition from school to work;

(7) collecting and analyzing information regarding post-program outcomes of participants in the Career Opportunities program, to the extent practicable, on the basis of socioeconomic status, race, gender, ethnicity, culture, and disability, and on the basis of whether the participants are students with limited-English proficiency, school dropouts, disadvantaged students, or academically talented students; and

(8) linking youth development activities with employer and industry strategies for upgrading the skills of their workers.

Administrative Costs

A regional partnership may not use more than 10 percent of expenditures for administrative costs.

The term "administrative costs" means the activities of a partnership that are necessary for the proper and efficient performance of its duties pursuant to the School-to-Work Opportunities Act that are not directly related to the provision of services to participants or otherwise allocable to the program's allowable activities listed in the Act. Administrative costs may be personnel and non-personnel costs. Costs of administration include, but are not limited to, such categories as:

(1) Costs of salaries, wages, and related costs of the grantee's staff engaged in-

* Overall system management, system coordination, and general administrative functions;

* Monitoring of sub-recipients;

* Procurement activities, including the award of specific sub-grants, contracts, and purchase orders;

* Developing systems and procedures, including management information systems, for ensuring compliance with the requirements under the Act;

* Preparing reports and other documents related to the Act;

* Coordinating the resolution of audit findings.

(2) Costs for goods and services required for administration of the Career Opportunities system, such as the fiscal agent fee;

(3) Costs of system-wide management functions; and

(4) Travel costs incurred for official business in carrying out grants management or administrative activities.

All staff members whose salaries fall within the Personnel line item of the Career Opportunities line item budget are required to document their administrative time. This can best be done by indicating administrative and programmatic hours on a timesheet. Records of time allocation should be maintained at the office of the fiscal agent.

In addition, staff members who work on Career Opportunities and other programs must document the amount of time spent on Career Opportunities and the amount of time spent on the other programs.

Safeguards

Career Opportunities programs must apply the following safeguards, as required under Section 601 of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act:

* No student participating in a Career Opportunities program shall displace any currently employed worker (including a partial displacement, such as a reduction in the hours of non-overtime work, wages, or employment benefits).

* No Career Opportunities program shall impair existing contracts for services or collective bargaining agreements, and no such program that would be inconsistent with the terms of a collective bargaining agreement shall be undertaken without the written concurrence of the labor organization and employer concerned.

* No student participating in a Career Opportunities program shall be employed or fill a job-

(A) when any other individual is on temporary layoff, with the clear possibility of recall, from the same or any substantially equivalent job with the participating employer; or

(B) when the employer has terminated the employment of any regular employee or otherwise reduced the workforce of the employer with the intention of filling the vacancy so created with the student.

* Students participating in Career Opportunities programs shall be provided with adequate and safe equipment and safe and healthful workplaces in conformity with all health and safety requirements of Federal, State, and local law.

* Funds appropriated under authority of this Act shall not be expended for wages of students or workplace mentors participating in such programs.

Reports

Quarterly Report: Each regional partnership is required to submit quarterly programmatic and financial reports. The data provided in the quarterly reports justify regional partnership expenditures and budget requests. These reports are due in the state office on January 15, April 15, July 15, and October 15 of each year.

Annual Accountability Report: Accountability reports justify regional partnership expenditures and budget requests. An oral presentation of the Accountability reports is made by the regional partnerships to the state staff.

Annual Application for Funds: A new application for regional partnership funding is required annually. An equal amount of basal funding is awarded annually to each of the nine regional partnerships. The end-of-year accountability report and quarterly report performance data are used in awarding additional incentive funding to the regional partnerships that achieve performance goals.

Monitoring

State staff will make annual on-site regional partnership reviews. Both programmatic and fiscal reviews will be conducted.

Accountability

Each Career Opportunities partnership is required to maintain an accountability system. The accountability system should document student participation rates, along with participation in each of the program components. Accountability is measured on a quarterly basis with the regional quarterly reports, and annually with the end-of-year accountability report.

RELATED LINK:

Go to http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CTECareerOpportunitiesindex.htm for Career Opportunities forms, regional directory, etc.

SUPPORT-GUIDANCE AND SPECIAL NEEDS

Why do career planning in your schools?

The Arkansas Department of Education Rules and Regulations Governing Public School Student Services states:

8.0 Documentation of Services

8.01 Each building based school site in all school districts shall submit annual reports indicating services provided through the Student Services Plan to the Department of Education....

8.03 Each school counselor serving students in buildings housing students in grades 8-12 shall provide a career planning process for each student. During the five-year process documentation of the information provided must be maintained as to whether the information was discussed with the student in individual or group settings. Each counselor is to develop a form to document these activities which can be a form used district-wide. A copy of the form and a statement of how services were provided must be submitted to the Department of Education as part of the annual report required in 8.01.

The Federal Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-332) says:

Sec. 134. Local Plan for Vocational and Technical Education Programs

" (a) Local Plan Required. -Any eligible recipient desiring financial assistance under this part shall, in accordance with requirements established by the eligible agency (in consultation with such other educational entities as the eligible agency determines to be appropriate) submit a local plan to the eligible agency. Such local plan shall cover the same period of time as the period of time applicable to the State plan submitted under section 122.

" (b) Contents. - The eligible agency shall determine requirement for local plans, except that each local plan shall -

" (1) describe how the vocational and technical education programs required under section 135(b) will be carried out with funds received under this title;

" (2) describe how the vocational and technical education activities will be carried out with respect to meeting State adjusted levels of performance established under section 113;

" (3) describe how the eligible recipient will -

" (A) improve the academic and technical skills of students participating in vocational and technical education programs by strengthening the academic, and vocational and technical components of such programs through the integration of academics with vocational and technical education programs through a coherent sequence of courses to ensure learning in the core academic, and vocational and technical subjects;

" (B) provide students with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of an industry; and

" (C) ensure that students who participate in such vocational and technical education programs are taught to the same challenging academic proficiencies as are taught for all other students;

" (4) describe how parents, students, teachers, representatives of business and industry, labor organizations, representatives of special populations, and other interested individuals are involved in the development, implementation, and evaluation of vocational and technical education programs assisted under this title, and how such individuals and entities are effectively informed about, and assisted in understanding, the requirements of this title;

" (5) provide assurances that the eligible recipient will provide a vocational and technical education program that is of such size, scope, and quality to bring about improvement in the quality of vocational and technical education programs;

" (6) describe the process that will be used to independently evaluate and continuously improve the performance of the eligible recipient;

" (7) describe how the eligible recipient -

" (A) will review vocational and technical education programs, and identify and adopt strategies to overcome barriers that result in lowering relates of access to or lowering success in the programs, for special populations; and

" (B) will provide programs that are designed to enable the special populations to meet the State adjusted levels of performance;

" (8) describe how individuals who are members of special populations will not be discriminated against on the basis of their status as members of the special populations;

" (9) describe how funds will be used to promote preparation for nontraditional training and employment; and

" (10) describe how comprehensive professional development (including initial teacher preparation) for vocational and technical, academic, guidance, and administrative personnel will be provided.

Sec. 135. Local Uses of Funds

" (a) GENERAL AUTHORITY. - Each eligible recipient that receives funds under this part shall use such funds to improve vocational and technical education programs.

" (b) REQUIREMENTS FOR USES OF FUNDS. - Funds made available to eligible recipients under this part shall be used to support vocational and technical education programs that -

" (1) strengthen the academic, and vocational and technical skills of students participating in vocational and technical education programs by strengthening the academic, and vocational and technical components of such programs through the integration of academics with vocational and technical education programs through a coherent sequence of courses to ensure learning in the core academic, and vocational and technical subjects;

" (2) provide students with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of an industry;

" (3) develop, improve, or expand the use of technology in vocational and technical education, which may include -

" (A) training of vocational and technical education personnel to use state-of-the-art technology, which may include distance learning;;

" (B) providing vocational and technical education students with the academic, and vocational and technical skills that lead to entry into the high technology and telecommunications field; or

" (C) encouraging schools to work with high technology industries to offer voluntary internships and mentoring programs;

The Arkansas Department of Workforce Education "State Plan for Vocational and Technical Education" for 1999-2004 says:

2.26 Preparing Students for Further Education or Entry into High Skill, High Wage Jobs in Current and Emerging Occupations. [Section 122(c)(1)(C)]

Helping students understand the many career and education all opportunities that are available to them is the first step in helping them prepare for postsecondary education and their chosen career. The career guidance and counseling model being promoted by the Department of Workforce Education is Career Action Planning (CAP). The purpose of CAP is to help students and their parents explore educational and occupational possibilities and make appropriate career decisions based on a solid base of information. The CAP program involves teachers as advisors to work with all students and their parents in developing and maintaining individualized career plans and portfolios. CAP begins in grade eight with students beginning to build their career portfolio that includes scores on standardized tests, learning styles, career interests, as well as previous grades.

Each advisor is assigned a group of students for the year. The basic program elements are as follows:

(1) Students meet monthly with their advisor. During these meetings, students learn about career opportunities and follow a comprehensive guidance curriculum that includes printed information and videos.

(2) Advisors assist the students in developing a career portfolio and an individualized career plan.

(3) Advisors meet with the students in grades 8-11 and their parents each spring to update the career portfolio, evaluate progress toward a planned program of study, and set short-term and long-term goals.

(4) In grades 8 through 10, students participate in career assessment. As a result of the CAP program, a phenomenally high percent of the parents of the students in grades 8 through 11 attend the annual conferences to help plan their sons' and daughters' career paths. For seniors, special "Senior Seminars" put them in touch with local employers and postsecondary opportunities. Students in schools that have implemented the CAP program are taking higher level courses, completing coherent programs of study with an academic or vocational focus, and remaining more focused on their post-high school goals. ...

... Students enrolled in vocational and technical education programs will be prepared for post-high school opportunities by ensuring they are equipped with (1) a solid foundation of academic skills and the ability to apply those skills in advanced education, training, and employment; (2) workplace skills, including work ethic, employability skills, and higher-order thinking skills; and (3) technical competencies, including computer proficiencies.

RELATED LINKS:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CTESCTEGuidanceSpecialneeds.htm

http://ed.gov/offices/OVAEA/ocEd/lnfoBoard/legis.html

Coordinated Career Education and Coordinated Compensatory Vocational Education

Program Description

These programs are designed specifically for students with disabilities, academically disadvantaged students, students with Limited English Proficiencies (LEP) who need specifically designed instruction or students who need a more supportive environment to be successful. The program design includes courses in Coordinated Compensatory Vocational Education (CCVE) and Coordinated Career Education (CCE) I and II.

Teacher Qualifications

The qualifications for a CCE teacher require (1) A teaching certificate in a vocational/ occupational specialty area and (2) 12 college credit hours in Special Education and/or Vocational Special Populations Courses.

Teachers with Special Education certificates shall have 12 college credit hours in Vocational Education courses. Examples of these courses include History and Principles of Vocational Education, Strategies for Cooperative Education, Methods in Vocational Education, Career Orientation Programs, Curriculum Development in Vocational Education and Evaluation and Program Planning.

These hours must be obtained at a rate of six hours per school year until all deficiencies have been removed.

CCVE teachers shall have a valid/current teaching certificate.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type

1. Coordinated Compensatory Vocational Education (CCVE) is a course designed to serve students with disabilities and academically disadvantaged students in secondary schools. It is a course of basic instruction based on identified student needs. Instruction will include the areas of math, reading, language arts, science, social studies, and life-skills. That is, the seventh and eighth grade basic skills class shall have a vocational focus or orientation with emphasis on entry level competencies. Ninth through twelfth grade basic skills classes shall be related to the career focus program of study (occupational specialty) in which the student is or will be enrolled.

2. Coordinated Career Education (CCE I) and Coordinated Career Education II (CCE II) are cooperative courses which combine classroom instruction with on the job training.

Note: Start-up of new or expanded CCVE or CCE programs is no longer being considered.

B. Length of Course

1. Coordinated Compensatory Vocational Education (CCVE) may be designed as a one semester, or a one-year course.

2. Coordinated Career Education (CCE I and II) is designed as a one and/or a two-year program.

C. Eligibility of Students

1. Students with disabilities and academically disadvantaged students enrolled in grades 7-12 shall be eligible for the Coordinated Compensatory Vocational Education (CCVE) course.

2. Eleventh and twelfth grade students with disabilities and academically disadvantaged students who are at least 16 years of age (to meet wage and hour law requirements) and who have adequate employability skills for entry-level competitive or sheltered employment will be eligible for the Coordinated Career Education (CCE) program. Students shall be employed and compensated in accordance with state and federal wage regulations.

D. Curriculum/Content Frameworks

Each CCE/CCVE teacher shall follow approved State curriculum/content frameworks for each course approved by the Department of Workforce Education.

E. Course Credits

It is recommended that the equivalent of one unit of credit per year be given to completers of the Coordinated Compensatory Vocational Education (CCVE) course and three units of credit for cooperative program completers.

Facilities and Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be secured from Guidance and Special Needs Unit and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

The career and technical student organization Coordinated Career Education Chapters of Arkansas (CCECA) shall be an integral part of the Coordinated Career Education cooperative instructional program and shall follow the same guidelines, goals, and objectives, and activities as the Arkansas State Chapter.

RELATED LINKS:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CTECoordinatedCompenVocEd.html

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CTECCE.html

Jobs for Arkansas' Graduates (JAG)

Program Description

Jobs for Arkansas' Graduates (JAG) is a new program that is designed to assist career and technical students whose ability to successfully graduate from high school and obtain meaningful employment is in jeopardy.

Teacher Qualifications

The JAG Specialist is to be secondary licensedjn a vocational or any core academic area and endorsed through the completion of program management training developed and approved by the Department of Workforce Education.

(Existing GCE, CCE, and CCVE coordinators and instructors are eligible to "grandfather" into the program by completing the designated program management training.)

It is strongly recommended that during the first year of operation the JAG Specialist be employed on a contract of a minimum of 215 days. It is also strongly recommended that during each subsequent year the Specialist be employed on a contract of a minimum of 225 days.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type

Jobs for Arkansas' Graduates (JAG) can be utilized in any program of study and can count as credit toward a student's career focus/major. The program's goal is to ensure student graduation (or GED) and prepare them for workplace success whether their career begins immediately upon high school graduation, entry into military service or requires them to complete post-secondary education/training.

B. Length of Course

Jobs for Arkansas' Graduates (JAG) is designed as a one year (Senior School-to Career Application) or as a two year (Multi-Year Dropout Prevention Application) program.

C. Eligibility of Students

Eleventh and twelfth grade career and technical students with multiple identified barriers shall apply for acceptance to the JAG program. The Specialist identifies a student's barriers prior to placement into the program. Students are to have an identified career focus/major and have completed at least 1 unit and be enrolled in 2nd unit of the identified career focus/major.

D. Curriculum/Content Frameworks

The Jobs for Arkansas Graduates (JAG) Specialists shall follow approved State and National curriculum/content frameworks approved by the Department of Workforce Education and Jobs for America's Graduates.

E. Course Credits

One unit of credit per year is to be given for Jobs for Arkansas' Graduates (JAG) participants. A student's maximum length of enrollment in the JAG program shall be two years depending on the application of the model. JAG may be utilized as a related option of any program of study. It is not a stand-alone program of study or career focus/major.

Part time employment is not a requirement of the JAG program but credit can be given at the discretion of the individual school district. Schools who grant credit for work-based learning shall follow the course credit guidelines for the Workforce Education Internship program.

Facilities and Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be secured from the Guidance and Special Needs Section and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

Career and Technical Student Organization

While National Jobs for America's Graduates' (JAG) asks that elements of their career association (National Career Association) be included in the curriculum, Arkansas JAG Specialists will provide support to the students and advisors in the student's career focus Career and Technical Student Organization. JAG students are strongly encouraged to hold membership in the student organization that represents their chosen career focus/major area. The Specialists will assist the JAG students in the activities of their chosen CTSO. The NCA activities will be utilized as classroom management tools.

RELATED LINK:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/JAG.html

PROVE

Providing Real Opportunities for Vocational Education

Program Description

This secondary program is individualized to meet the specific academic needs of career and technical students who are members of a special population. This program provides a versatile spectrum of instruction with the intent of improving vocational and academic scores and/or skills. Student eligibility is to be discussed with the student, parents, PROVE instructor and/or counselor prior to enrollment.

Teacher Qualifications

The PROVE instructor is to be secondary licensed in any vocational area and/or either hold certification in Reading, Math, or Language Arts and endorsed through the completion of program management training developed and approved by the Department of Workforce Education.

Existing CCVE instructors with teaching certificates may "grandfather" as PROVE instructors by completing the designated program management training by completing the designated program management training.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type

PROVE is a recommended course for students, in the ninth and/or tenth grades in secondary schools, who are academically disadvantaged, and/or are Limited English Proficient. It is a course of basic instruction based on identified student needs. Instruction will include the areas of math, reading, language arts, and life-skills. The basic skills instruction shall be related to the vocational program of study/career focus in which the student is or will be enrolled. The administration of a pre- and post-assessment tool (TABE) is required of all students. Documentation of student achievement is required.

B. Length of Course

PROVE is designed to meet the individual needs of the student. It is recommended as a one-year course.

C. Eligibility of Students

Students who are members of the special population are defined as students who score between the 15th and 35th percentile on standardized tests in reading, mathematics, or language arts; and/or students of Limited English Proficiency (LEP). This ninth or tenth grade student is or will be enrolled in a vocational program or study/career focus.

Student eligibility shall be discussed with the student, parents, PROVE instructor and/or counselor prior to enrollment.

D. Course Credits

It is recommended that a student may earn the equivalent of one unit of credit per year for the successful completion of the PROVE course. This course will not count as a credit towards a students career focus major.

E. Facilities and Equipment

Facilities and equipment requirements may be secured from Support - Guidance and Special Needs Unit and must be met within the specified time for program approval.

APPLIED SCIENCES

Program Description

Career and Technical Education instruction is designed to prepare specialized workers at the technician level in occupational fields that include the technology supportive to professional engineers, scientists, physicians, and managers. Usually technology implies an extensive concentration in a particular occupational field along with the associated mathematics (algebra, as a minimum) and science (usually physics). Consequently, many technical programs are usually offered in a two-year postsecondary education environment. However, to prepare students for a technological society and to prepare them with the academic skills and technical principles sufficient to allow them to succeed in advanced technical programs, a "Principles of Technology - Applied Physics" program is available at the secondary level.

Course Description

Principles of Technology (PT) is an instructional program for secondary students interested in technical careers and other students wishing to further their understanding of the physical principles underlying modern technology. The program provides instruction in mechanical, fluid, electrical and thermal principles on which modern equipment operates and the mathematics associated with these principles. This program may be taught to provide an alternative for increased course work in science and to provide two units of applied and laboratory science toward graduation.

Teacher Qualifications

A qualified teacher of PT must hold a valid teaching license, be licensed in Physical Earth Science (A.Y.A) in secondary education, be certified in physics or have physics approval, and complete a Department of Workforce Education workshop in teaching methods for PT.

Instructional Program

A. Course Type, Length, Curriculum, and Course Credit

PT is designed as a hands-on, activity based, applied physics program normally requiring two years to complete. Students will receive information and experiences from a balance of sources such as class lecture, demonstration and discussions, the text and workbook, audio/video/visual aids, math skills labs, hands-on physics applications labs and review.

The PT teacher shall follow the Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD) teacher manuals, which are used as the course content guide for the PT program. Since the Science Frameworks published by the Department of Education are not as specific as the CORD PT objectives, the end of course tests for PT are correlated to the objectives found in the CORD PT curriculum.

One physics (science) credit toward graduation requirements shall be given students who complete the two-year PT program (PT I and PT II). One elective vocational credit or one physical science credit shall be given students who complete only one year of the PT program.

B. Eligibility of Students

Students in the tenth, eleventh, and 12 grade shall have the option of choosing the PT program, but students shall have a sound understanding of mathematics including Algebra I prior to entering the PT program.

Facilities and Equipment

The facility requirements are similar to the science classroom/laboratory requirements for physics; see facilities requirements as published by Department of Education. Water and drain, compressed air and electricity are required; gas is desirable.

Career and Technical Student Organizations

PT students are encouraged to join the Skills USA - VICA student organization.

APPRENTICESHIP

Apprenticeship is a structured training and educational system designed to prepare individuals for specific occupations. It combines on-the-job training (OJT) under the supervision of experienced journey workers at the work site along with education conducted by qualified instructors in related classroom instruction. Apprenticeship programs are driven by business and industry employers who specify the competencies or processes required for mastery in the occupations; these become the standards for which the apprentices will master. Apprenticeship programs require at minimum one year of training and education, but usually require four or five years. Specific apprenticeship programs require registry with the U.S. Department of Labor/Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (USDOL/BAT). Apprentices who successfully complete the prescribed number of hours in OJT and classroom instruction in a registered apprenticeship program are awarded certificates of completion and are then considered journeyman. Apprentices may also receive post-secondary certificates, diplomas, and degrees as a result of completing their specific apprenticeship program.

Qualifications of the apprentice vary according to the requirements of the occupation. However, all apprenticeship programs require applicants to be at least 16 years old and physically able to perform the job. All companies prefer and most require a high school diploma or equivalent certificate. Some training and education beyond high school may enhance the apprentice's opportunities in an apprenticeship program and allow the apprentice to progress through a program more quickly and easily.

The State of Arkansas recognizes the significance of apprenticeship programs in enhancing the skill levels of the employees and workers in Arkansas businesses and industries. Three methods of providing improvement funds are available for employers and apprentices: Traditional Apprenticeship, Youth Apprenticeship, and Construction Training.

Traditional Apprenticeship

The term "Traditional Apprenticeship" is used to designate the adult apprenticeship programs that are registered with the USDOL/BAT and that receive State Improvement Funds based upon hours of related classroom instruction. These programs are operated by employers, employer associations, or jointly by management and labor on a voluntary basis. The State Apprenticeship Office (SAO), within the Department of Workforce Education, monitors the related classroom instruction portion of USDOL/BAT registered apprenticeship programs that apply and are approved for State Improvement Funds.

The Arkansas Apprenticeship Coordination Steering Committee (AACSC) provides guidance to and coordinates with the SAO to effectively promote and enhance apprenticeship programs in Arkansas. The AACSC is composed of 20 voting members, appointed by the Governor's Office, from business/industry, labor, education, and female minority sector, and six non-voting, advisory members appointed by government and education agencies.

Teachers or instructors of Traditional Apprenticeship related classroom instruction are chosen by the local apprenticeship committee based upon the instructor's experience and teaching abilities. Instructors are usually selected from the technical programs at high schools, technical institutes or colleges, and business/industry companies. The instructional materials are frequently developed by and available from labor associations and curriculum centers or developed locally by the employers and experienced journey workers.

The standards (or implementation plan) for each apprenticeship program is written in a specific format by the local committee and submitted to the USDOL/BAT for approval and registry- This document states how and when the learning processes will occur, what the responsibilities are of the employer and apprentice, and what wages will be awarded upon completion of each level of mastery. The employer and each apprentice then signs their respective employer agreement and apprentice agreement which are also registered with the USDOL/BAT. If an apprenticeship program is properly registered with the USDOL/BAT, then the program is eligible to apply for State Improvement Funds.

Youth Apprenticeship

The term "Youth Apprenticeship" is a shorten version of the term Youth Apprenticeship/Work-Based Learning or YA/WBL. These terms designate the high school and post-secondary youth apprenticeship programs that are approved by the Department of Workforce Education/State Apprenticeship Office (DWE/SAO) and that receive State Improvement Funds based upon a performance based budget. The youth apprentice or work-based learning student is usually 16 to 21 years old, entered the YA/WBL program while in high school, has a six year career plan that includes high school and post-secondary education and training, agreed to a three year (minimum) apprenticeship program, and will obtain not only certification/license in his/her occupation but a high school diploma and a post-secondary certificate, diploma, or degree. These programs are operated by consortia of employers, employer associations, and educational institutions. The SAO monitors and provides guidance, in both the training and education portions, to youth apprenticeship consortia that apply and are approved for State Improvement Funds.

The instructors in YA/WBL programs are usually secondary licensed or team-teach with a secondary licensed teacher so that the youth apprentice will receive high school credit toward graduation. These instructors are usually selected from the technical programs at high schools, technical institutes or colleges, and business/industry companies. The instructional materials are usually in place at participating high and post-secondary schools, but are sometimes acquired from labor associations, professional associations, and curriculum centers. In a few cases the instructional materials are developed locally by the employers, experienced journey workers, and the high and post-secondary instructors. In either case, the applicable occupational specialist or program manager at the Department of Workforce Education/Career and Technical Education will review and approve the instructional materials.

The implementation plan for each occupational apprenticeship program, the employer agreements, the apprentice agreements, and the apprentice six year career plans will be completed and maintained at the YA/WBL consortia for review and approval by the SAO. Additionally, the YA/WBL apprenticeship consortia are expected to achieve and maintain seven common design principles and six essential elements to be approved for State Improvement Funds.

The seven common design principles are:

1) The creation of a strong infrastructure that represents local and state actors, including employers, organized labor, government, secondary schools, and two-year and four-year institutes, colleges, and universities.

2A) A system that is industry-driven, where employers and their representatives help set occupational skill standards, collaborate on curriculum, provide paid work experience and workplace instructors for apprentices, and certify mastery of skills leading to the award of a portable credential;

2B) Focus on learning about "all aspects" of a broad industry cluster rather than mastering a narrow set of occupational skills.

3A) Articulation of programs between high schools and post-secondary, credit-granting institutions;

3B) Program length must be a minimum of three years, at least one/two high school years and two/one post-secondary years, and the program must constitute the core of the students education during those years.

4) Structured integration between the workplace and the classroom and between academic learning and vocation training.

5) Priority on the provision of and training for high quality jobs with employers committed to the concept of "high performance work organizations".

6) Adequate, effective support system for participants.

7) A model that is replicable, can reach significant scale, and is central to education reform strategies.

The six essential elements are:

1) Employers provide paid work experience and guided work site learning.

2) Schools integrate academic and occupational/vocational learning.

3) School and workplace learning are coordinated and integrated.

4) Programs articulate high school and post-secondary learning and are at least three years in duration.

5) Completers receive widely recognized credentials of both academic and occupational skill mastery.

6) Programs are governed by broad coalitions of institutional partners.

Approved YA/WBL consortia are also expected to submit quarterly narrative and expenditure reports by the 15th day following the closeout of a yearly quarter and to maintain an efficient program with a performance based budget at or below $2,000 per youth apprentice.

Construction Training

Recent legislation in the form of Act 474 of 1999 provides for a construction industry craft training education program in vocational schools, technical schools, and colleges. It imposes a construction permit surcharge to fund this program. Rules and Regulations were developed which outline the application and award process. The Department of Workforce Education/State Apprenticeship Office along with the Arkansas Apprenticeship Coordination Steering Committee will administer this program as sufficient funds are accumulated in the specially designated account.

RELATED LINK:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/apprenticeship%20index.html

TECH PREP ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS (TPAD)

GUIDELINES

These guidelines have been established to provide consistency and insure that all

consortia are in compliance with the Perkins Act of 1998 and the Arkansas State Plan

(Seehttp://www.ed.gov/offices/OVAE/grntprgm.html and http://www.work-ed.state.ar.usweb sites for copies).

CONSORTIUM MEMBERSHIP

Must include one or more secondary schools offering vocational and technical education programs of study; and

1. One or more non-profit postsecondary schools that offer 2-year associate degree, certificate, or apprenticeship programs; or

2. One or more postsecondary proprietary institutions that offer a 2-year associate degree program.

Additional membership may include 4-year postsecondary schools and employer/labor organizations. Schools may be members of more than one consortium and may be located inside or outside the State.

REQUIRED PROGRAM CONTENTS

Each tech-prep program shall -

* be carried out under an articulation agreement between the participants in the consortium;

* consist of at least 2 years of secondary school preceding graduation and 2 years or more of higher education, or an apprenticeship program of at least 2 years following secondary instruction, with a common core of required proficiency in mathematics, science, reading, writing, communication, and technologies designed to lead to an associate's degree or a postsecondary certificate in a specific career field;

* include the development of tech-prep programs for both secondary and postsecondary, including consortium, participants in the consortium that-

1. meets academic standards developed by the State;

2. links secondary schools and 2-year postsecondary institutions, and if possible and practicable, 4-year institutions of higher education through non-duplicative sequences of courses in career fields, including the investigation of opportunities for tech-prep secondary students to enroll concurrently in secondary and postsecondary coursework;

3. uses, if appropriate and available, work-based or worksite learning in conjunction with business and all aspects of an industry; and

4. uses educational technology and distance learning, as appropriate, to involve all the consortium partners more fully in the development and operation of programs;

* include in-service training for teachers that -

1. is designed to train vocational and technical teachers to effectively implement tech-prep programs;

2. provides for joint training for teachers in the tech-prep consortium;

3. is designed to ensure that teachers and administrators stay current with the needs, expectations, and methods of business and all aspects of an industry;

4. focuses on training postsecondary education faculty in the use of contextual and applied curricula and instruction; and

5. provides training in the use and application of technology;

* include training programs for counselors designed to enable counselors to more effectively -

1. provide information to students regarding tech-prep education programs;

2. support student progress in completing tech-prep programs;

3. provide information on related employment opportunities;

4. ensure that such students are placed in appropriate employment; and

5. stay current with the needs, expectations, and methods of business and all aspects of an industry;

* provide equal access, to the full range of technical preparation programs, to individuals who are members of special populations, including the development of tech-prep program services appropriate to the needs of special populations; and

* provide for preparatory services that assist participants in tech-prep programs.

* Additional Authorized Activities.-Each tech-prep program may-

1. provide for the acquisition of tech-prep equipment;

2. acquire technical assistance State or local entities that have designed, established, and operated tech-prep programs that have effectively used educational technology and distance learning in the delivery of curricula and services and in the articulation process; and

3. establish articulation agreements with institutions of higher education, labor organizations, or businesses located inside or outside the State served by the consortium, especially with regard to using distance learning education technology to provide for the delivery of services and programs.

Special Consideration. -The eligible agency, as appropriate, shall give special consideration to applications that -

1. provide for effective employment placement activities or the transfer of students to baccalaureate degree programs;

2. are developed in consultation with business, industry, institutions of higher education, and labor organizations;

3. address effectively the issues of school dropout prevention and reentry and the needs of special populations;

4. provide education and training in areas or skills in which there are significant workforce shortages, including the information technology industry; and

5. demonstrate how tech-prep programs will help students meet high academic and employability competencies.

CAREER FOCUS PROGRAM OF STUDY

A TPAD program of study must include an articulation agreement and combine a minimum of two years of secondary and two years of postsecondary (associate degree, certificate, apprenticeship or two years of a four year program.) education. The program must be designed around the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education (DWE) Career Focus programs of study and the prescribed DWE career clusters and majors. A program must begin in grades 9, 10, or 11 and continue through the completion of a postsecondary component. Entry into the TPAD program requires a career focus program of study signed by the student and parent. This program of study must be reviewed and signed annually until completion of the secondary component.

NOTE: 18 month technical certificate programs are accepted for the postsecondary component.

ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS

General Articulation Agreements: Agreements that involve only the general principle of cooperation and working together, or the general concept of transfer credit. NOTE: For maximum enrollments this agreement should state that only documented TPAD students shall be eligible for articulated credit.

Specific Articulation Agreements: Articulation agreements that focus on specific occupational specialties, programs. These agreements must be true credit granting or time-shortened (partial credit) articulation agreements that do not rely on testing. Credit shall be granted upon enrollment, completion of no more than12 hours, or completion of one semester at the postsecondary institution.

TPAD STUDENT

Secondary: A student who is participating in an approved TPAD sequence of courses and has indicated intent (4-6 year program of study signed by student and parent on file) to follow the approved career focus. The major identifier is the intent to follow a recommended career focus.

NOTE: A student is not required to be secondary vocational completer to continue in grades 13 and 14 of their recommended career focus.

NOTE: Academic dual credit courses are accepted for one year of the two years required at the secondary level.

Postsecondary: A student who has matriculated from the secondary program and continues to pursue a career focus which is an extension of an approved secondary TPAD program. The student will be receiving articulated college credit. Many postsecondary schools do not list student majors in grades 13 and 14, the major identifier is the intent to follow a recommended pathway.

Completer: A student who has completed an associate degree, two-year certificate or apprenticeship, or enrolled in grade 15 of a four-year program.

REPORTS

Time Distribution Sheet: Time distribution sheets are required quarterly for each TPAD employee paid with funds from more than one source. Time sheets are due the end of the month following each quarter.

Mid-year Accountability Report: A narrative report describing consortia July-December activities is required each January 31.

Annual Expenditure Report: Report of expenditures by budget category. Report and warrant for unexpended funds are due July 31. (Contact DWE if a later date is needed.)

Annual Accountability Report: Accountability reports justify consortia expenditures and budget requests. An oral presentation of the Accountability Reports will be made by the consortia to state staff.

Annual Application: A new request for consortia funding is required annually. The end-of-year accountability report will be used in budget approval. Basal funding is based on student data. (New consortia receive a base minimum for three years.)

MONITORING

State staff will make annual on-site consortia reviews which will include validation/review of:

* random samples of student Social Security Numbers,

* parental involvement/attempt on agreements,

* capital equipment inventory for the previous three years,

* minutes of consortia meetings,

* accountability system and reports,

* business/industry involvement, and

* Perkins Title II required program contents.

ACCOUNTABILITY

Each consortia is required to maintain an accountability system. The Accountability Report will be used to justify consortium expenditures and in determining funding amounts. Basal funding will be based on TPAD student data for secondary students, postsecondary students, and completers.

NOTE: Final budget adjustments may be required to ensure that the combined consortia budget total does not exceed the state allotment of Perkins Title II funds.

Basal funding may be adjusted based on the following activities:

1. Consortium expansion

2. Articulation

3. Completers transferred to 4-year degree program or placed in employment within six months of completing TPAD program

4. Nontraditional recruitment and placement

5. Student retention (dropout prevention)

6. Providing education/training in areas/skills in which there are significant workforce shortages, including the information technology industry

7. Helping students meet high academic and employability competencies

8. Activities to support High Schools That Work and/or Career Academies

Penalty Items:

There will be a reduction in basal funding for each of the following items not provided or addressed:

Activities, etc. required by Perkins

Articulation matrix

Copies of articulation agreements

Accountability system requirements

TPAD Student Data: Student SSNs are required for DWE to track students and obtain demographic, special populations, career focus, secondary completer, etc. data. This is a mandatory item for accountability and funding. Failing to provide student SSN data will result in the report not being accepted.

RELATED LINKS:

Go to http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CTETPAD.htm for TPAD forms, consortia directory, etc.

SPECIAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RELATING TO SECONDARY AREA CENTERS

I. Application/Approval

A. Secondary Area Center Approval

1. An application for a new secondary area center must be submitted to the Associate Director of Workforce Training in the Department of Workforce Education on or before October 1, prior to the school year in which the center is scheduled to open. Guidelines and application forms for a new secondary area center may be obtained by contacting the Associate Director of Workforce Training, #3 Capitol Mall, Luther S. Hardin Bldg., Little Rock, AR 72201-1083, or by calling (501) 682-1505.

2. Priority will be given to areas not currently being served by a center. A center will not be approved within 25 miles of an existing center unless it can be demonstrated that the creation of a new center will not adversely impact adjoining centers.

3. A sponsoring institution/entity (public high school, postsecondary technical institute, two-year college, or educational service cooperative)_that has been approved as an area center may begin operation with three occupation specific programs, but must have five or more in operation by the start of the fourth year. Only occupational specific programs will be eligible for area center funding. Other programs will not be eligible for vocational center aid.

4. An area center that closes and desires to resume operation must submit a new application to the State Board of Workforce Education and Career Opportunities (SBWECO) for approval. A center that is approved by SBWECO for start-up, but fails to begin operation within a two-year period, shall be considered null and void.

B. New or Expanded Programs

1. For new or expanded program approval, the sponsoring institution/entity shall submit a proposal to the Deputy Director of_Career and Technical Education, Department of Workforce Education prior to October 1, preceding the year in which the program(s) is to be implemented. Guidelines for preparation of this proposal may be requested from the appropriate Career and Technical Education program manager or Workforce Training office.

2. New programs must be approved by the Associate Director of Workforce Training before the center can draw vocational center aid.

C. Satellite Locations

1. An existing secondary area center or proposed center, approved by the SBWECO may provide satellite location(s) to school districts that are located outside the 25 miles or 30 minutes of driving time. Satellite locations must be shared by more than one school district. Satellite locations will be eligible for funding in the same manner as center programs.

2. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) shall be completed, signed by cooperating parties, and on file in the director's office concerning the operation of satellite locations.

3. All applications for a satellite location require the approval of SBWECO.

II. Finance

A. Funding

1. The education/training fee will be set at a minimum of one-half the Base

Local Revenue per Full-Time Equivalent (FTE). The education/training fee will be collected from each sending school by the secondary area center.

2. Vocational center aid will be calculated and distributed by the Department of Workforce Education based upon each center's ADM_FTE enrollment.

3. No existing local program will be permitted to convert to an area center program.

4. Funding modifications shall be approved by the SBWECO.

B. Supplemental Funds

1. Secondary area centers shall be eligible for new program start-up funds as outlined in Program Policies and Procedures for Secondary Programs (available on the Workforce Education website at http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us).

2. Secondary area centers shall be eligible for capital equipment grants. (See the above-mentioned policies.)

3. Secondary area centers may from time-to-time be eligible for federal vocational funds. The Department of Workforce Education will inform secondary area center directors of these as soon as they become available.

4. Secondary area centers may apply for and receive on its own merits any special grant funds from other agencies. Funding of secondary area centers is not limited to state funding as described above.

C. Policies for Start-up and Special Equipment Funds

1. See Program Policies and Procedures for Secondary Programs.

III. Expenditures

A. Reporting

1. An annual expenditure report is to be completed and sent to the Department of Workforce Education.

2. Enrollment data shall be submitted to DWE each semester. Each center will include enrollment verification from each participating high school. Enrollment and verification forms are available on the Secondary Area Center website.

3. Funds not expended in accordance with Act 819 of 2001 shall be carried forward into the succeeding year.

IV. Operations

A. Secondary Area Center Responsibility

1. The management, maintenance, and operation of a secondary area center shall be the responsibility of the sponsoring institution or entity in accordance with the policies established by the SBWECO.

2. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) shall be completed, signed by cooperating parties, and on file in the director's office concerning the operation of satellite locations. (Section A.2. is moved to section I.C.2.)

3. Failure to properly maintain and operate a secondary area center may result, by recommendation to the SBWECO, closure of the center.

B. Designation of Secondary Area Center Director

1. Each secondary area center having a minimum of five programs shall employ a vocational director on a half time or full-time basis.

C. Secondary Area Center Council

1. Each secondary center shall have an active area center council. The council shall be comprised of superintendents of the sponsoring and local school districts participating in the secondary area center along with the director of the center. When a postsecondary institution is designated as a secondary area center, the director or president/chancellor of that institution shall be a member. Additionally, where secondary area centers are sponsored by an education service cooperative, the director shall be a member of the council. The secondary area center council shall serve in an advisory capacity for the area center in all areas of administration and operation, e.g., scheduling, student discipline, program design, etc. The center council may also assist with determining the capacity of a center.

2. An active advisory council is recommended for each occupational program area.

D. Instructor Qualifications

1. Instructors shall be required to meet the certification/qualifications as outlined for each occupational area. Documentation of these qualifications shall be on file in the certification office of the Department of Education.

Postsecondary instructors who teach secondary students must meet the certification requirements for teaching secondary students.

E. Employee Policies

1. The sponsoring institution/entity shall adopt official employee policies and procedures, including a salary schedule, sick leave, inclement weather, grievance, benefits, and other policies. These must be adopted by the start of the second semester of operation.

F. Student Handbook

1. The sponsoring institution/entity shall adopt a student handbook outlining the rules and regulations relating to discipline, attendance, hand tools, textbooks, OCR Grievance Procedures, and other matters. These must be adopted by the start of the second semester of operation.

G. Class Periods

1. Occupation-specific programs offered at a secondary area center may be one, two, or three 50-minute periods in length depending on the approved program structure. When only two 50-minute periods are scheduled, there shall not be a scheduled class break. Class periods of 100 to 129 minutes shall be considered as two periods. Three period classes shall meet a minimum of 130 minutes. In order to restructure a program of study, the vocational center may work with the Department of Workforce Education to implement course design and class lengths.

H. Instruction

1. Each approved program offered must follow curriculum content frameworks and administer student competency tests.

I. Transportation

1. Responsibility for transporting students to and from the local school to an area center shall be determined by the secondary area center director and the administration of the local school district.

J. Exceptions

1. Expansion of secondary area centers into areas not being served is a priority of the Department of Workforce Education. The director may, upon request, make exceptions to the above stated policies when such requests are supported by adequate justification.

V. Definitions

* Access is an attempt for every high school student in Arkansas to have the opportunity to participate in any of a minimum of three occupation specific vocational programs offered within 25 miles or 30 minutes of the home schools.

* Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) shall be considered the equivalent of one student attending class for six class periods, e.g., one student attending a three period class the full year would equal one-half FTE.

* Capacity of a vocational center is determined by multiplying the number of blocks of occupation-specific programs (two or three hours) by 20.

* Local districts are the districts in the locality, which are eligible to participate in vocational center programs.

* Occupation-specific vocational education programs are a vocational or technical program which have paid employment in specific occupations as their objective.

* Private and/or home-schooled students are eligible to participate in secondary area center programs through the local school district in which they officially reside.

* Satellite location is the extension of a secondary area center located outside the boundaries of an existing center (25 miles or 30 minutes of driving time) or to students in isolated areas. Satellite locations will be provided by an approved secondary area center, and must be shared by more than one school district. All satellite locations require the approval of the SBWECO.

* Secondary area center is a public secondary vocational institution organized for the specific purpose of educating high school students in specific occupational/vocational areas. A center will serve students from more than one participating school district. Students eligible to attend a secondary area center will generally come from a twenty-five (25) mile radius or thirty minute driving time from the local school. A secondary area center must be comprised of three specific vocational programs to begin operation. Also, it must have at least five programs in operation by the start of the fourth year.

* Short-term adult vocational classes are specialized classes organized for the purpose of providing training, retraining, and upgrading of skills for which there is an identified demand in the employment market.

* Sponsoring institution is a comprehensive high school, a postsecondary vocational technical institute, a two-year or community/technical college, an education service cooperative, or any other entity authorized by law that has been approved by the SBWECO. The sponsoring institution will function as the fiscal agent, manage, and administer the secondary area center. (Reference Act 788 of 1985 and Act 819 of 2001)

RELATED LINKS for Secondary Vocational Centers:

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/postsecond.html

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/about.html

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CTEIogopage.htm

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/CTESCTENewandExpandedPrograms.htm

http://www.work-ed.state.ar.us/sacdirectorinformation.html

http://uark.edu/depts/awecc/content/listing.html

http://www.uark.edu/misc/sct/

(6/10/2002)

The following state regulations pages link to this page.