05-071 C.M.R. ch. 131, § 1 - ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

Current through 2022-14, April 6, 2022

CONTENT STANDARD AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

1. READING
1.1 WORD IDENTIFICATION SKILLS and STRATEGIES (R-1)

Grade 2

1.1.1 :Students apply word identification and decoding strategies by ...

( R-2-1)

1.1.1.1 Identifying regularly spelled multi-syllabic words, by using knowledge of sounds, syllable types, or word patterns (including most common spellings for consonants and vowels, e.g., knot, catch, float, fight; or common suffixes )

(R-2-1.1)

EXAMPLES: Students might be asked to match words to pictures or to match words to words with similar sounds (e.g. flower and shower)

EXAMPLES: (multi-syllabic words): happiness, shower, sunshine

Grade 3

1.1.2 Students apply word identification/ decoding strategies by ...

(R-3-1)

1.1.2.1 Identifying multi-syllabic words, by using knowledge of sounds, syllable types, or word patterns (including prefixes, suffixes, or variant spellings for consonants or vowels, e.g., bought) (R-3-1.1)

EXAMPLES: Students might be asked to match words to words with similar sounds, such as which word rhymes with the word in the box or which word has the same vowel sound as the word in the box.

EXAMPLES (multi-syllabic words): pretending, discussion

1.2 VOCABULARY

1.2.1 VOCABULARY STRATEGIES (R-2)

Grade 2

1.2.1.1 Students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by...

( R-2-2)

1.2.1.1.1 Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word structure, including common base words and suffixes, such as "thickest," "hope-ful;" or context clues, including illustrations and diagrams; or prior knowledge) (R-2-2.1)

Grade 3

1.2.1.2 Students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by...

(R-3-2)

1.2.1.2.1 Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word structure, including prefixes/suffixes and base words, such as "un-covered;" or context clues; or other resources, such as dictionaries, glossaries; or prior knowledge) (R-3-2.1)

Grade 4

1.2.1.3 Students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by...

( R-4-2)

1.2.1.3.1 Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word structure, including prefixes/suffixes and base words; or context clues; or other resources, such as dictionaries, glossaries; or prior knowledge) (R-4-2.1)

Grade 5

1.2.1.4 Students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by...

(R-5-2)

1.2.1.4.1 Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word structure, including prefixes/suffixes and base words; or context clues; or other resources, such as dictionaries, glossaries; or prior knowledge (R-5-2.1)

Grade 6

1.2.1.5 Students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by...

(R-6-2)

1.2.1.5.1 Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word structure, including prefixes/suffixes and base words; or context clues; or other resources, such as dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses; or prior knowledge) (R-6-2.1)

Grade 7

1.2.1.6 Students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by...

(R-7-2)

1.2.1.6.1 Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word structure, including prefixes/suffixes, base words, common roots, or word origins; or context clues; or other resources, such as, dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses; or prior knowledge) (R-7-2.1)

EXAMPLE (of common root ): inspection (in -spec- tion)

Grades 9-Diploma

1.2.1.7 Students identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary by...

(R-10-2)

1.2.1.7.1 Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word structure) including prefixes/suffixes, common roots, or word origins; or context clues; or resources including dictionaries, glossaries, or thesauruses to determine definition, pronunciation, etymology, or usage of words; or prior knowledge)

(R-10-2.1)

(Assumes a variety of text and increasing text complexity across grade levels)

1.2.2 BREADTH OF VOCABULARY (R3)

Grade 2

1.2.2.1 Students show breadth of vocabulary knowledge, demonstrating understanding of word meanings or relationships by ...

( R-2-3)

1.2.2.1.1 Identifying synonyms or antonyms; or categorizing words (R-2-3.1)

EXAMPLES (of categorizing): Given a T-chart with two "categories" of words listed (e.g., shapes and sizes), students would identify another word to add to the chart that describes shapes or sizes; or in a multiple choice item, select the best category title for the words listed

1.2.2.1.2 Selecting appropriate words to use in context, including words specific to the content of the text (R-2-3.2)

EXAMPLE: In a short passage about Native American homes, students might encounter the words longhouse and igloo, and then be asked to show that they know the difference between them.

Grade 3

1.2.2.2 Students show breadth of vocabulary knowledge, demonstrating understanding of word meanings or relationships by ...

(R-3-3)

1.2.2.2.1 Identifying synonyms, antonyms, or homonyms/ homophones; or categorizing words (R-3-3.1)

1.2.2.2.2 Selecting appropriate words to use in context, including content specific vocabulary (e.g., predator/prey), or words with multiple meanings) (R-3-3.2)

EXAMPLE (multiple meanings): Students identify the intended meaning of words found in text - The word "fall" can mean a time of the year or losing your step. What words from the passage help you to know what "fall" means in this story"

EXAMPLE (multiple meanings): The word "fall" has many different meanings. Which sentence below uses the word "fall" to mean a time of the year" OR Which sentence below uses "fall" with the same meaning as it is used in the poem"

Grade 4

1.2.2.3 Students show breadth of vocabulary knowledge through demonstrating understanding of word meanings or relationships by ...

(R-4-3)

1.2.2.3.1 Identifying synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/ homophones, or shades of meaning (R-4-3.1)

EXAMPLE (of shades of meaning): cold, freezing

1.2.2.3.2 Selecting appropriate words to use in context, including content specific vocabulary, words with multiple meanings, or precise vocabulary (R-4-3.2)

EXAMPLE (precise vocabulary): In this passage, the bear could best be described as acting:

(A) excited (B) playful (C) harmful (D) curious

Grade 5

1.2.2.4 Students show breadth of vocabulary knowledge through demonstrating understanding of word meanings or relationships by ...

(R-5-3)

1.2.2.4.1 Identifying synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/ homophones, or shades of meaning (R-5-3.1)

EXAMPLE (of shades of meaning): tired, exhausted

1.2.2.4.2 Selecting appropriate words or explaining the use of words in context, including, content specific vocabulary, words with multiple meanings, or precise vocabulary (R-5-3.2)

EXAMPLE (multiple meanings): Students explain the intended meanings of words found in text - Based on the way "spring" is used in this passage, would having a "spring" be necessary for survival" Explain how you know.

Grade 6

1.2.2.5 Students show breadth of vocabulary knowledge through demonstrating understanding of word meanings and relationships by...

(R-6-3)

1.2.2.5.1 Identifying synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/ homophones or shades of meaning, or simple analogies (R-6-3.1)

EXAMPLE (simple analogy): parent:child as cat:kitten

1.2.2.5.2 Selecting appropriate words or explaining the use of words in context, including content specific vocabulary, words with multiple meanings, or precise vocabulary (R-6-3.2)

Grade 7

1.2.2.6 Students show breadth of vocabulary knowledge through demonstrating understanding of word meanings and relationships by...

(R-7-3)

1.2.2.6.1 Identifying synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/ homophones or shades of meaning, or analogies (R-7-3.1)

EXAMPLE (analogy): map:locate as recipe:cook

1.2.2.6.2 Selecting appropriate words or explaining the use of words in context, including content specific vocabulary, words with multiple meanings, or precise vocabulary (R-7-3.2)

Grades 9-Diploma

1.2.2.7 Students show breadth of vocabulary knowledge through demonstrating understanding of word meanings and relationships by...

(R-10-3)

1.2.2.7.1 Identifying synonyms, antonyms, homonyms/ homophones, shades of meaning, idioms, or word origins, including words from dialects, or other languages that have been adopted into our language/standard English (R-10-3.1)

1.2.2.7.2 Selecting appropriate words or explaining the use of words in context, including connotation or denotation, shades of meanings of words/nuances, or idioms; or use of content-specific vocabulary, words with multiple meanings, precise language, or technical vocabulary (R-10-3.2)

EXAMPLE Students might be asked to explain the meaning of terminology appropriate to the content of the subject area as used in a text passage

(Assumes a variety of text and increasing text complexity across grade levels.)

1.3 LITERARY TEXTS

1.3.1 INITIAL UNDERSTANDING of LITERARY TEXTS (R-4)

Grade 2

1.3.1.1 Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by...

(R-2-4)

1.3.1.1.1 Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem, solution, or major events as appropriate to text. (R-2-4.1)

Grade 3

1.3.1.2 Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by...

(R-3-4)

1.3.1.2.1 Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/solution, major events, or plot as appropriate to text. (R-3-4.1)

1.3.1.2.2 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot with events sequenced as appropriate to text. (R-3-4.2)

Grade 4

1.3.1.3 Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by...

(R-4-4)

1.3.1.3.1 Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/solution, major events, or plot as appropriate to text or identifying any significant changes in character(s) over time. (R-4-4.1)

1.3.1.3.2 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot with major events sequenced, as appropriate to text. (R-4-4.2)

Grade 5

1.3.1.4 Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by...

(R-5-4)

1.3.1.4.1 Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/ solution, major events, or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in character(s) over time (R-5-4.1)

1.3.1.4.2 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot, with major events sequenced, as appropriate to text (R-5-4.2)

Grade 6

1.3.1.5 Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by...

(R-6-4)

1.3.1.5.1 Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/ solution, or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in character or setting over time (R-6-4.1)

EXAMPLE (of setting changing): In this poem, how does the farm's appearance change over the years"

1.3.1.5.2 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot, with major events sequenced, as appropriate to text (R-6-4.2)

Grade 7

1.3.1.6 Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by...

(R-7-4)

1.3.1.6.1 Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/ solution, or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in character or setting over time; or identifying rising action, climax, or falling action (R-7-4.1)

1.3.1.6.2 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot, with major events sequenced, as appropriate to text (R-7-4.2)

Grades 9-Diploma

1.3.1.7 Students demonstrate initial understanding of elements of literary texts by...

(R-10-4)

1.3.1.7.1 Identifying, describing, or making logical predictions about character (such as protagonist or antagonist), setting, problem/solution, or plots/subplots, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in character, relationships, or setting over time; or identifying rising action, climax, or falling action (R-10-4.1)

1.3.1.7.2 Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot, with major events sequenced, as appropriate to text (R-10-4.2)

(Assumes a variety of text and increasing text complexity across grade levels.)

1.3.2 ANALYSIS and INTERPRETATION OF LITERARY TEXTS, CITING EVIDENCE (R-5)

Grade 2

1.3.2.1 Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-2-5)

1.3.2.1.1 Making logical predictions (R-2-5.1)

EXAMPLE: What might happen next"

1.3.2.1.2 Identifying relevant physical characteristics or personality traits of main characters (R-2-5.2)

1.3.2.1.3 Making basic inferences about problem or solution (R-2-5.3)

EXAMPLES: What helped Luke to solve his problem in the story" What was Jane's problem"

Grade 3

1.3.2.2 . Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-3-5)

1.3.2.2.1 Making logical predictions (R-3-5.1)

1.3.2.2.2 Describing main characters' physical characteristics or personality traits; or providing examples of thoughts, words or actions that reveal characters' personality traits (R-3-5.2)

1.3.2.2.3 Making basic inferences about problem, conflict, or solution (e.g., cause-effect relationships) (R-3-5.3)

EXAMPLE: How might the story have been different if."

1.3.2.2.4 Identifying the author's basic message (R-3-5.5)

EXAMPLE: In this story, Jon learned an important lesson about what to do when lost in the woods. What lesson did Jon learn"

Grade 4

1.3.2.3 Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-4-5)

1.3.2.3.1 Making logical predictions (R-4-5.1)

1.3.2.3.2 Describing main characters' physical characteristics or personality traits; or providing examples of thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters' personality traits (R-4-5.2)

1.3.2.3.3 Making inferences about problem, conflict, or solution (R-4-5.3)

EXAMPLE: What influenced the father's decision to let his son try the climb"

1.3.2.3.4 Identifying who is telling the story (R-4-5.4)

1.3.2.3.5 Identifying author's message or theme (R-4-5.5)

EXAMPLE: What was the author trying to say about friendship in this story" (e.g., friendship begins with accepting differences)

Grade 5

1.3.2.4 Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-5-5)

1.3.2.4.1 Making logical predictions (R-5-5.1)

EXAMPLE: Which event is most likely to happen next" (e.g., providing evidence from text to explain why something is likely to happen next)

1.3.2.4.2 Describing characters' physical characteristics, personality traits, or interactions; or providing examples of thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters' personality traits or their changes over time (R-5-5.2)

1.3.2.4.3 Making inferences about problem, conflict, solution, or the relationship among elements (plot, character, setting) within text (e.g., how the setting affects a character or plot development) (R-5-5.3)

1.3.2.4.4 Identifying the narrator (R-5-5.4)

1.3.2.4.5 Identifying author's message or theme (implied or stated, as in a fable) (R-5-5.5)

1.3.2.5 Students analyze and interpret author's craft, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-5-6)

1.3.2.5.1 Demonstrating knowledge of use of literary elements and devices (i.e., imagery, exaggeration) to analyze literary works (R-5-6.1)

Grade 6

1.3.2.6 Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-6-5)

1.3.2.6.1 Explaining or supporting logical predictions (e.g., providing evidence from text to explain why something is likely to happen next (R-6-5.1)

1.3.2.6.2 Describing characters' traits, motivation, or interactions, citing thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters' traits, motivations, or their changes over time (R-6-5.2)

1.3.2.6.3 Making inferences about cause/effect, external conflicts (e.g., person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship among elements within text (e.g., how the historical era influences the characters' actions or thinking) (R-6-5.3)

1.3.2.6.4 Explaining how the narrator's point of view affects the reader's interpretation (R-6-5.4)

EXAMPLE:This story is told from Ted's point of view. What do you know about how Ted feels because he tells the story"

1.3.2.6.5 Identifying author's message or theme (R-6-5.5)

1.3.2.7 Students analyze and interpret author's craft, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-6-6)

1.3.2.7.1 Demonstrating knowledge of use of literary elements and devices (i.e., imagery, exaggeration, simile, metaphor, foreshadowing, or suspense) to analyze literary works (R-6-6.1)

Grade 7

1.3.2.8 Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-7-5)

1.3.2.8.1 Explaining or supporting logical predictions (R-7-5.1)

1.3.2.8.2 Describing characters' traits, motivation, or interactions, citing thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters' traits, motivations, or their changes over time (R-7-5.2)

1.3.2.8.3 Making inferences about cause/effect (e.g., explaining how an event gives rise to the next), internal or external conflicts (e.g., person versus self, person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship among elements within text (R-7-5.3)

1.3.2.8.4 Explaining how the narrator's point of view affects the reader's interpretation (R-7-5.4)

1.3.2.8.5 Explaining how the author's message or theme is supported within the text (R-7-5.5)

1.3.2.9 Students analyze and interpret author's craft, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-7-6)

1.3.2.9.1 Demonstrating knowledge of use of literary elements and devices (i.e., imagery, exaggeration, repetition, flashback, foreshadowing, personification) to analyze literary works (R-7-6.1)

EXAMPLE: Why did the author choose to use flashback in this story"

Grades 9-Diploma

1.3.2.10 Students analyze and interpret elements of literary texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-10-5)

1.3.2.10.1 Explaining and supporting logical predictions or logical outcomes (e.g., drawing conclusions based on interactions between characters or evolving plot) (R-10-5.1)

1.3.2.10.2 Examining characterization (e.g., stereotype, antagonist, protagonist), motivation, or interactions (including relationships), citing thoughts, words, or actions that reveal character traits, motivations, or changes over time (R-10-5.2)

1.3.2.10.3 Making inferences about cause/effect, internal or external conflicts (e.g., person versus self, person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship among elements within text (e.g., describing the interaction among plot/subplots) (R-10-5.3)

1.3.2.10.4 Explaining how the narrator's point of view or author's style is evident and affects the reader's interpretation (R-10-5.4)

EXAMPLE: If this story were told from another character's point of view, how would the reader's interpretation be different"

1.3.2.10.5 Explaining how the author's purpose (e.g., to entertain, inform or persuade) message or theme (which may include universal themes) is supported within the text (R-10-5.5)

1.3.2.11 Students analyze and interpret author's craft, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-10-6)

1.3.2.11.1 Demonstrating knowledge of author's style or use of literary elements and devices (i.e., imagery, repetition, flashback, foreshadowing, personification, hyperbole, symbolism, analogy, allusion, diction, syntax, or use of punctuation) to analyze literary works (R-10-6.1)

(Assumes a variety of text and increasing text complexity across grade levels)

1.4 INFORMATIONAL TEXTS

1.4.1 INITIAL UNDERSTANDING of INFORMATIONAL TEXT (Expository and Practical Text across Content Areas) (R-7)

Grade 2

1.4.1.1 Students demonstrate initial understanding of informational texts (expository and practical texts) by...

(R-2-7)

1.4.1.1.1 Obtaining information, from text features (e.g., simple table of contents, glossary, charts, graphs, diagrams, or illustrations) (R-2-7.1)

EXAMPLE: On what page would you find information about snakes"

1.4.1.1.2 Using explicitly stated information to answer questions (R-2-7.2)

EXAMPLE: According to this report, what do dolphins eat"

Grade 3

1.4.1.2 Students demonstrate initial understanding of informational texts (expository and practical texts) by...

(R-3-7)

1.4.1.2.1 Obtaining information, from text features (e.g., table of contents, glossary, basic transition words, bold or italicized text, headings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations) (R-3-7.1)

EXAMPLES: What words does the author want you to notice on this page" What is the last step of the directions"

1.4.1.2.2 Using information from the text to answer questions related to explicitly stated main/central ideas or details (R-3-7.2)

1.4.1.2.3 Organizing information to show understanding (e.g., representing main/central ideas or details within text through charting or mapping) (R-3-7.3)

EXAMPLE: Given a chart (with headings filled in), students are asked to provide examples from the text to show physical characteristics of two different places or things

Grade 4

1.4.1.3 Students demonstrate initial understanding of informational texts (expository and practical texts) by...

(R-4-7)

1.4.1.3.1 Obtaining information from text features (e.g., table of contents, glossary, index, transition words/phrases, bold or italicized text, headings, subheadings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations) (R-4-7.1)

1.4.1.3.2 Using information from the text to answer questions related to explicitly stated main/central ideas or key details (R-4-7.2)

1.4.1.3.3 Organizing information to show understanding (e.g., representing main/central ideas or details within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, or summarizing) (R-4-7.3)

Grade 5

1.4.1.4 Students demonstrate initial understanding of informational texts (expository and practical texts) by...

(R-5-7)

1.4.1.4.1 Obtaining information from text features (e.g., table of contents, glossary, index, transition words /phrases, bold or italicized text, headings, subheadings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations) (R-5-7.1)

1.4.1.4.2 Using information from the text to answer questions related to main/central ideas or key details (R-5-7.2)

1.4.1.4.3 Organizing information to show understanding (e.g., representing main/central ideas or details within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting)

(R-5-7.3)

Grade 6

1.4.1.5 Students demonstrate initial understanding of informational texts (expository and practical texts) by...

(R-6-7)

1.4.1.5.1 Obtaining information from text features (e.g., table of contents, glossary, index, transition words /phrases, bold or italicized text, headings, subheadings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations) (R-6-7.1)

1.4.1.5.2 Using information from the text to answer questions related to main/central ideas or key details (R-6-7.2)

1.4.1.5.3 Organizing information to show understanding (e.g., representing main/central ideas or details within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting) (R-6-7.3)

Grade 7

1.4.1.6 Students demonstrate initial understanding of informational texts (expository and practical texts) by...

(R-7-7)

1.4.1.6.1 Obtaining information from text features (e.g., table of contents, glossary, index, transition words /phrases, transitional devices, bold or italicized text, headings, subheadings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations) (R-7-7.1)

1.4.1.6.2 Using information from the text to answer questions, to state the main/central ideas, or to provide supporting details (R-7-7.2)

1.4.1.6.3 Organizing information to show understanding (e.g., representing main/central ideas or details within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, or comparing/contrasting) (R-7-7.30

Grades 9-Diploma

1.4.1.7 Students demonstrate initial understanding of informational texts (expository and practical texts) by...

(R-10-7)

1.4.1.7.1Obtaining information from text features[e.g., table of contents, glossary, index, transition words/phrases, transitional devices (including use of white space), bold or italicized text, headings, subheadings, graphic organizers, charts, graphs, or illustrations] (R-10-7.1)

1.4.1.7.2Using information from the text to answer questions; to state the main/central ideas; to provide supporting details; to explain visual components supporting the text; or, to interpret maps, charts, timelines, tables, or diagrams (R-10-7.2)

1.4.1.7.3Organizing information to show understanding or relationships among facts, ideas, and events (e.g., representing main/central ideas or details within text through charting, mapping, paraphrasing, summarizing, comparing/contrasting, outlining) (R-10-7.3)

(Assumes increasing text complexity across grade levels.)

1.4.2 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF INFORMATIONAL TEXTS (EXPOSITORY AND PRACTICAL TEXT ACROSS CONTENT AREAS) CITING EVIDENCE (R-8)

Grade 2

1.4.2.1 Analyze and interpret informational text, citing evidence as appropriate by...

(R-2-8)

1.4.2.1.1 Connecting information within a text (R-2-8.1)

EXAMPLE: Combining or comparing facts and details presented - What food is eaten by both kinds of fish"

1.4.2.1.2 Recognizing generalizations about text (e.g., identifying appropriate titles or main/central ideas) (R-2-8.2)

1.4.2.1.3 Making basic inferences or drawing basic conclusions (R-2-8.3)

EXAMPLE: Based on this report, do turtles make good pets"

1.4.2.1.4 Making inferences about causes or effects, when signal words are present (R-2-8.5)

EXAMPLE: "The sun came out. Then the puddle dried up." What made the puddle dry up"

Grade 3

1.4.2.2 Students analyze and interpret informational texts, citing evidence where appropriate by...

(R-3-8)

1.4.2.2.1 Connecting information within a text (R-3-8.1)

EXAMPLE: Combining, comparing, or using information found in both the written text and in a caption in a text

1.4.2.2.2 Recognizing generalizations about text (e.g., identifying appropriate titles, assertions, or controlling ideas) (R-3-8.2)

1.4.2.2.3 Making basic inferences, drawing basic conclusions, or forming judgments/opinions about central ideas that are relevant (R-3-8.3)

1.4.2.2.4 Distinguishing fact from opinion (R-3-8.4)

1.4.2.2.5 Making inferences about causes or effects (R-3-8.5)

EXAMPLE: What probably caused the fire to start in the garage"

Grade 4

1.4.2.3 Students analyze and interpret informational text, citing evidence as appropriate by...

(R-4-8)

1.4.2.3.1 Connecting information within a text or across texts (R-4-8.1)

1.4.2.3.2 Synthesizing information within or across text(s) (e.g., constructing appropriate titles; or formulating assertions or controlling ideas) (R-4-8.2)

1.4.2.3.3 Drawing inferences about text, including author's purpose (e.g., to inform, explain, entertain) or message; or drawing basic conclusions; or forming judgments/opinions about central ideas that are relevant (R-4-8.3)

1. 4.2.3.4 Distinguishing fact from opinion (R-4-8.4)

1. 4.2.3.5 Making inferences about causes or effects (R-4-8.5)

Grade 5

1.4.2.4 Students analyze and interpret informational text, citing evidence as appropriate by...

(R-5-8)

1.4.2.4.1 Connecting information within a text or across texts(R-5-8.1)

1.4.2.4.2 Synthesizing information within or across text(s) (e.g., constructing appropriate titles; or formulating assertions or controlling ideas) (R-5-8.2)

1.4.2.4.3 Drawing inferences about text, including author's purpose (e.g., to inform, explain, entertain, persuade) or message; or forming and supporting opinions/judgments and assertions about central ideas that are relevant

(R-5-8.3)

1.4.2.4.4 Distinguishing fact from opinion (R-5-8.4)

1.4.2.4.5 Making inferences about causes or effects (R-5-8.5)

Grade 6

1.4.2.5 Students analyze and interpret informational text, citing evidence as appropriate by...

(R-6-8)

1.4.2.5.1 Connecting information within a text or across texts (R-6-8.1)

1.4.2.5.2 Synthesizing information within or across text(s) (e.g., constructing appropriate titles; or formulating assertions or controlling ideas (R-6-8.2)

1.4.2.5.3 Drawing inferences about text, including author's purpose (e.g., to inform, explain, entertain, persuade) or message; or forming and supporting opinions/judgments and assertions about central ideas that are relevant (R-6-8.3)

1.4.2.5.4 Distinguishing fact from opinion, and identifying possible bias/propaganda (R-6-8.4)

1.4.2.5.5 Making inferences about causes or effects (R-6-8.5)

Grade 7

1.4.2.6 Students analyze and interpret informational text, citing evidence as appropriate by...

(R-7-8)

1.4.2.6.1 Explaining connections about information within a text, across texts, or to related ideas (R-7-8.1)

1.4.2.6.2 Synthesizing and evaluating information within or across text(s) (e.g., constructing appropriate titles; or formulating assertions or controlling ideas (R-7-8.2)

1.4.2.6.3 Drawing inferences about text, including author's purpose (e.g., to inform, explain, entertain, persuade) or message; or using supporting evidence to form or evaluate opinions/judgments and assertions about the central ideas that are relevant (R-7-8.3)

EXAMPLE (of evaluating): Given a statement (opinion, judgment, or assertion), students provide evidence from the text that this statement does/does not support the author's purpose in writing the piece.

1.4.2.6.4 Distinguishing fact from opinion, and identifying possible bias/propaganda or conflicting information within or across texts (R-7-8.4)

1.4.2.6.5 Making inferences about causes or effects (R-7-8.5)

Grades 9-Diploma

1.4.2.7 Students analyze and interpret informational text, citing evidence as appropriate by...

(R-10-8)

1.4.2.7.1 Explaining connections about information within a text, across texts, or to related ideas (R-10-8.1)

EXAMPLE:Students are asked to compare information presented in two textual excerpts.

1.4.2.7.2 Synthesizing and evaluating information within or across text(s) (e.g., constructing appropriate titles; or formulating assertions or controlling ideas)

(R-10-8.2)

EXAMPLE:How does the title of the article reflect the author's perspective"

1.4.2.7.3 Drawing inferences about text, including author's purpose (e.g., to inform, explain, entertain, persuade) or message; or explaining how purpose may affect the interpretation of the text; or using supporting evidence to form or evaluate opinions/judgments and assertions about central ideas that are relevant (R-10-8.3)

1.4.2.7.4 Distinguishing fact from opinion, and evaluating possible bias/propaganda or conflicting information within or across texts (R-10-8.4)

1.4.2.7.5 Making inferences about causes and/or effects (R-10-8.5)

1.4.2.7.6 Evaluating the clarity and accuracy of information (e.g. consistency, effectiveness of organizational pattern, or logic of arguments) R-10-8.6

(Assumes increasing text complexity across grade levels.)

Notes

05-071 C.M.R. ch. 131, § 1

The following state regulations pages link to this page.



State regulations are updated quarterly; we currently have two versions available. Below is a comparison between our most recent version and the prior quarterly release. More comparison features will be added as we have more versions to compare.