06- 096 C.M.R. ch. 115, § 7 - Ambient Air Quality Analysis

A. General requirement. It shall be the burden of any applicant to provide an affirmative demonstration that its emissions, in conjunction with all other sources, will not violate applicable ambient air quality standards, except that sources in nonattainment areas or which significantly impact a nonattainment area shall be required to demonstrate that the source's emissions are consistent with Reasonable Further Progress provisions of the State Implementation Plan. An applicant may use ambient air monitoring, modeling, or other assessment techniques as approved by the Department. New Source Review modeling required pursuant to subsection 7 (C and D) of this Chapter shall be consistent with EPA regulations and guidelines or other requirements under the CAA. The analyses shall include relevant emissions units at the source, as determined by the Department, meteorological and topographical data necessary to estimate such impacts, and shall consider the impact of fugitive emissions, to the extent quantifiable, secondary emissions, and emissions from other existing sources including increases in mobile and area source emissions impacting the same area.

The level of analysis shall depend upon the size of the source, the regulated air pollutants emitted, existing air quality, proximity to Class I or nonattainment areas, or areas where increment has been substantially consumed. (For the purposes of this subsection, the Class I area shall include any conservation easements under the jurisdiction of an appropriate Federal Land Manager as of August 7, 1977.) The air quality impact analysis, in general, will not be required of the applicant for those regulated pollutants that are not listed under "significant emissions increase" in 06-096 CMR 100. The analysis shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of subsection 7(E) of this Chapter, Prohibited Dispersion Techniques, 06-096 CMR 116 and Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models.

Air quality modeling conducted as part of the licensing of a new source or modification in the United States is substantially governed by the Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models. That modeling guidance was first promulgated in 1978 and by law, must be routinely updated by EPA. Thus, federal regulatory guidance on modeling and the list of acceptable models do change. The Department recognizes that air dispersion modeling guidance will be periodically updated, to reflect the latest federal guidance. To maintain an orderly licensing process in the State, applicants will be required to conform with those procedures and guidelines in effect at the time of Department approval of a written modeling protocol that meets all applicable requirements, and to complete modeling, as approved, and submit results within six (6) months of the date of approval of the protocol. If the protocol calls for collection of on-site meteorological data, then the starting date for the on-site data collection must be no later than 6 months after approval of the protocol and modeling results must be submitted within six (6) months of obtaining acceptable on-site meteorological monitoring data. Requests by the applicant to modify the modeling protocol will require conformance with current applicable air dispersion modeling guidance.

(1) Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Requirements. Monitoring done by the owner or operator shall conform to the requirements of 40 CFR Part 58, Appendix B and the Department's Quality Assurance Plan (or other plan approved by the Department) during the operation of monitoring stations. It is recommended that a written protocol shall be developed by the owner or operator and the Department when a source is required to conduct either pre-construction or post-construction monitoring. The protocol shall, at a minimum, specify the monitoring sites, frequency of sampling, data recovery, pollutants, and monitoring method(s).
(2) Air Quality Impact Modeling Requirements
(a) All estimates of ambient concentrations required by an ambient or increment impact analysis shall be based on the relevant air quality models, data bases, and other requirements specified in the current Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models, and in accordance with subsection 7(E) of this Chapter and 06-096 CMR 116. Fugitive emissions, to the extent quantifiable, shall be considered.
(b) All input, output and diagnostic files used in the final Class I and Class II ambient air quality standards and increment compliance modeling analyses and Class I AQRV and visibility modeling analyses shall be submitted to the Department on media approved by the Department.
(c) Where an air quality impact model specified in the Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 Guideline on Air Quality Models, is inappropriate, the model may be changed or another model substituted; such change or substitution shall be subject to public comment and the written approval of the Department and the Regional Administrator of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency or his designee. Methods like those outlined in the Protocol for Determining the Best Performing Model (EPA-454/R-92-025) and the Interim Procedures for Evaluating Air Quality Models: Experience with Implementation (EPA-450/4-85-006) should be used to determine the comparability of air quality models.
B. Renewal of a Minor or Major Source License
(1) A previously submitted impact analysis shall be acceptable unless:
(a) It has been found to be deficient with respect to requirements set forth in subsection 7(A) of this Chapter;
(b) The impact analysis fails to reflect available information with respect to ambient air quality levels in the area, which, based upon the Department's expertise, may reasonably be expected to be significantly impacted by the source;
(c) The source emits a regulated pollutant for which an ambient air quality standard has been adopted and whose impact was not addressed in the original impact analysis;
(d) The renewal of the source is in conjunction with a Minor or Major Modification which requires a modeling analysis pursuant to subsection 7(C) or (D) of this Chapter; or
(e) There are changes in stack or building configurations or other factors, which are determined to significantly alter the dispersion characteristics of the source.
(2) Continuation of an ambient air monitoring or meteorological monitoring program shall be made on a case-by-case basis at the time of the renewal. It shall be the burden of the applicant to demonstrate the adequacy of existing data, its relationship to past, present, and future facility operating conditions, and the adequacy of other means to document continuing compliance.
(3) An existing source shall be exempt from an impact analysis with respect to a regulated pollutant whose allowable emissions, after the application of control technology requirements specified in Section 4 of this Chapter, do not exceed the following, unless the source is located in or near a Class I area or an area where the available air quality is limited, or other extenuating circumstances exist:
(a) 50 tons per year (tpy) for SO2;
(b) 250 tpy for CO;
(c) 25 tpy for PM10;
(d) 15 tpy for PM2.5 direct emissions;
(e) 50 tpy for NOx (measured as NO2);
(f) 0.6 tpy for Lead (Pb); or
(g) 0.2 tpy of total Chromium.
C. New Minor Sources and Minor Modifications to Minor or Major Sources. This Section applies to any new Minor source or Minor Modification of a Minor or Major source.
(1) A new Minor source or an existing Minor or Major source that previously was not required to submit an air quality impact analysis for an air emissions license, but is undergoing a Minor Modification shall submit an air quality impact analysis for those regulated pollutants that the Minor or Major source emits or has the potential to emit at levels equal to or greater than the limits in subsection 7(B)(3) of this Chapter after the application of control technology requirements specified in this Chapter. The level of the air quality impact analysis and air quality monitoring shall be determined by the Department on a case-by-case basis considering:
(a) Air quality data available in or representative of the area;
(b) Good Engineering Practice stack height. A cavity and wake region modeling analysis may be required by the Department if a stack height is less than the formula Good Engineering Practice stack height.
(c) Similarity with other licensed sources in terms of size, emissions, and local topography;
(d) Location, including proximity to complex terrain, Class I areas, integral vistas, nonattainment areas or areas where increment has been substantially consumed; and
(e) The results of previous air quality analyses.
(2) The level of air quality analyses and air quality monitoring for any new Minor source, any Minor Modification to an existing Minor or Major source which emits or has the potential to emit regulated pollutants at a rate less than the emission levels in subsection 7(B)(3) of this Chapter or any Minor Modification to an existing Minor or Major source which emits or has the potential to emit regulated pollutants at a rate greater than the emission levels in subsection 7(B)(3) of this Chapter and has an air quality analysis incorporated into its existing air emission license shall be determined on a case-by-case basis considering:
(a) Air quality data available in or representative of the area;
(b) Good Engineering Practice stack height. An analysis may be required, even in cases resulting in no increases in emissions, if a stack height is less than Good EngineeringPractice or if there are changes in stack or building configurations or other factors which are determined to alter the dispersion characteristics of the Minor or Major source.
(c) Similarity with other licensed sources in terms of size, emissions, and local topography;
(d) Location, including proximity to, complex terrain, Class I areas integral vistas, nonattainment areas or areas where increment has been substantially consumed; and
(e) The results of previous air quality analyses.
D. New Major Sources and Major Modifications. This Section applies to any new Major source or any Major Modification which emits or has the potential to emit a significant emissions increase of any regulated pollutant.
(1) Pre-construction monitoring
(a) For those pollutants for which there is an ambient air quality standard, the analysis shall consist of continuous air quality monitoring data gathered over a period of one year and shall represent the year preceding the application. If the Department determines that a complete and adequate analysis can be accomplished with monitoring data gathered over a period shorter than one year, the application may be deemed acceptable for processing based on the data gathered over that shorter period. The period shall not be less than 4 months. The applicant must demonstrate that such shorter period, or period other than the preceding year, is representative of ambient concentrations under the seasonal conditions expected to record the highest concentrations.
(b) For those pollutants for which no ambient air quality standard exists, the analysis shall contain such air quality monitoring data as the Department determines is necessary and feasible in light of methods available to monitor such pollutants.
(c) In areas where meteorological monitoring data are not available or the Department determines that the available data are inadequate or not representative, the new Major source or Major Modification shall be required to collect preconstruction meteorological data sufficient for air quality modeling, as defined in Meteorological Monitoring Guidance for Regulatory Modeling Applications (EPA-454/R-99-05). At least one year of data is required to be used in the modeling to support the application.
(d) A new Major source or Major Modification shall be exempt from the preconstruction monitoring requirements of this subsection if the emissions increase of a pollutant would cause, in every area, air quality impacts less than the following amounts:
(i) Carbon monoxide - 575 µg/m3, 8-hr. average;
(ii) Nitrogen dioxide - 14 µg/m3, annual average;
(iii) Sulfur dioxide - 13 µg/m3, 24-hr. average;
(iv) Ozone - No de minimis air quality level is provided for ozone. Any Major sources having a net emissions increase of 100 tpy or more of Volatile Organic Compounds (excluding negligibly photochemically reactive VOC) shall conduct ambient air monitoring except that when such Major source satisfies the condition of 40 CFR Part 51, Appendix S, Section IV, postapproval monitoring data for ozone may be substituted for preconstruction data;
(v) Lead - 0.1 µg/m3, 24-hr. average;
(vi) Mercury - 0.25 µg/m3, 24-hr. average;
(vii) Beryllium - 0.0005 µg/m3, 24-hr. average;
(viii) Fluorides - 0.25 µg/m3, 24-hr. average;
(ix) Vinyl chloride - 15 µg/m3, 24-hr. average;
(x) Total reduced sulfur - 10 µg/m3, 1-hr. average;
(xi) Hydrogen sulfide - 0.04 µg/m3, 1-hr. average;
(xii) Reduced sulfur compounds - 10 µg/m3 1-hr;
(xiii) Chromium - 0.02 µg/m3, 24-hr. average;
(xiv) PM2.5 - 4 µg/m3, 24-hr. average; and
(xv) PM10 - 10 µg/m3, 24-hr. average.
(2) Ambient air quality standards analysis. An ambient air quality standards analysis shall be submitted which includes dispersion modeling for each pollutant for which there is an ambient standard (except nonmethane hydrocarbons). The analysis also shall include ambient air monitoring, meteorological and topographic data necessary to estimate such impact, as well as an analysis of the impact of all other sources in the area with actual emissions of 100 tpy or more of the same pollutant. At a minimum, this analysis shall include all such sources that emit more than 100 tpy of a given regulated pollutant located within the lesser of 10 km or the area, which, based upon the Department's expertise, may reasonably be expected to be significantly impacted by the new Major source or Major Modification. Conservative regional background concentrations for sources not explicitly included in the modeling analysis are available from the Department. If more refined background concentrations are necessary, the impact of sources not explicitly included in the modeling analysis shall be obtained through an analysis of ambient air quality data as outlined in the Department's guidelines for determination of background concentrations.
(3) Ambient increment analysis. An increment analysis shall be submitted for each pollutant for which there is an ambient increment standard. The analysis shall include meteorological and topographical data necessary to estimate such impacts, as well as an analysis of the air quality impacts and nature and extent of any or all general, commercial, residential, industrial and other growth, including increases in mobile source and area source emissions which has occurred since the baseline date, and therefore have consumed increment in the area where the new Major source or Major Modification will significantly impact. The analysis shall include emissions not included in baseline year emissions, even though an analysis may not have been previously required for those emissions. The Department will provide emissions data from other sources to the applicant for inclusion in the increment analysis. This analysis shall be conducted in accordance with the modeling provisions of this subsection.
(4) Additional impact analysis. The proposed new Major source or Major Modification shall provide an additional impact analysis of:
(a) The impairment to visibility, soils and vegetation that would occur as a result of the new Major source or Major Modification and general, commercial, residential, industrial and other growth associated with the new Major source or Major Modification, except that an analysis of the impact on vegetation having no significant commercial or recreational value is not required;
(b) The air quality impact projected for the area as a result of general commercial, residential, industrial and other growth associated with the facility or modification; and
(c) The impact, including visibility impairment, on any Class I area or integral vista (see 06-096 CMR 114(1)(C)(1)). This includes impacts of AQRVs, plume blight (for regions within a Class I area that are affected by plumes or layers that are viewed against a background (generally within 50 kilometers of the source)) and regional haze (for regions of a Class I area where visibility impairment from the source would cause a general alteration of the appearance of the scene (generally 50 kilometers or more away from the source or from the interaction of the emissions from multiple sources)) impacts that the Federal Land Manager and the Department agree should be assessed. (Consultation with the appropriate Federal Land Manager (potentially affected federal lands are listed in 06-096 CMR 114) and the Department on these requirements and how to perform these analyses should begin prior to submittal of the initial modeling protocol.)
(5) Post-construction monitoring. The owner or operator, shall after construction of the new Major source or Major Modification, conduct such ambient monitoring or meteorological monitoring as the Department determines is necessary to determine the effect emissions from the new Major source or Major Modification may have, or are having, on air quality in any area.

A Major source or Major Modification shall be exempt from the requirements of this subsection if its emissions do not significantly impact a Class I area or an area where the increment is known to be violated or substantially consumed, and

(a) The allowable emissions increase will be temporary, not to exceed 2 years; and
(b) Any licensed portable source shall not increase, nor exceed, the allowable emissions and reasonable notice of not less than 10 working days prior to the relocation shall be given to the Department concerning its proposed location and probable duration of operation at the new location.
E. Modeling/data collection protocol. Any air quality dispersion modeling or data collection program shall be developed consistent with the following requirements:
(1) Guidance. All air quality dispersion modeling and meteorological data collection shall be conducted consistent with Section 7 of this Chapter and Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models.

NOTE: For major sources and major modifications, the applicant should consult with the Department and Federal Land Managers (potentially affected federal lands are listed in 06-096 CMR 114) if Class I analyses are required, prior to submitting a modeling/data collection protocol. The applicant is responsible for obtaining the training necessary to perform the required air dispersion modeling and meteorological data collection.

(2) Variance from guidance. Upon an applicant's written request, the Department may grant a variance from any of the requirements set forth in Section 7 of this Chapter and Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models, when the Department finds that the alternative proposed by the applicant will not significantly affect the accuracy of the modeling, and/or when data collection results or compliance with the requirements specified in Section 7 of this Chapter and Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models is technically infeasible or economically unreasonable for the applicant. For any minor source subject to PSD review, the variance shall be subject to EPA review, written approval, and shall be subject to notice and opportunity for public comment pursuant to 40 CFR Parts 51.160(f)(2) and 51.166(1)(2).
(3) Significant impact modeling protocol for SO 2, NO 2, CO, PM2.5 and PM 10. Prior to undertaking significant impact modeling for SO2, NO2, CO, PM2.5 and PM10, the applicant shall provide in writing to the Department, a description of the following factors that the applicant proposes to use in the significant impact modeling demonstration (see Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models for more specific guidance):
(a) Operating scenarios, emission units and emission rates in English and metric units;
(b) Regulated air pollutants;
(c) Model(s) and methodologies;
(d) Origin and period of meteorological data, including location of collection site relative to facility, meteorological parameters, instrument height, recovery rates, substitution techniques and QA/QC procedures;
(e) Receptor grid (listing of coordinates and elevations, topographic maps covering the receptor grid area map of receptors). A listing of all Digital Elevation Model (DEM) quadrangles used, and method(s) used to convert DEM data to the proposed receptor grid shall also be included. If DEM data is being used to create a rectangular receptor grid, then the elevation of each receptor point shall be the highest elevation within the grid cell. The grid cell is defined as an area enclosed by boundaries located half way to the nearest receptor in each direction;
(f) Any special (e.g., fenceline, air intake or flagpole) receptors;
(g) Identity of emission units and emissions which are included in baseline;
(h) A properly scaled plot plan of the proposed facility with clearly marked true north indicator, building heights and an accurate scale ruler. Also, show the location of the source on a map or aerial photograph of the area; and

NOTE: An original plot plan is preferred, but if a photocopy is submitted, care should be taken to make sure that the scale is not changed on any area of the plot.

(i) Building dimension and Good Engineering Practice (GEP) analysis techniques. For each stack, all buildings that are large enough and close enough to influence the stack should be considered in the GEP analysis.

As expeditiously as possible and within thirty (30) calendar days of receipt of this information, the Department shall notify the applicant in writing that such information is complete and acceptable for modeling or notify the applicant in writing of the reason(s) why the information is not complete. If the information is not complete, the Department shall clearly identify the changes or additional information that must be submitted to complete the protocol requirements.

(4) Submittal of significant impact modeling
(a) Prior to undertaking the final air quality dispersion modeling demonstration, the applicant shall submit the following for review:
(i) Significant impact modeling results (If all modeled impacts of any regulated pollutant are below the significant impact levels for all averaging periods, then no further analysis is necessary for that pollutant);
(ii) Emissions data for regulated pollutants not in the significant impact modeling protocol;
(iii) A preliminary analysis of nearby sources that will not be included in the background concentration analysis;

NOTE: The Department is responsible for the final decision of off-site sources to be modeled. The Department will provide the applicant with a list of any additional sources that may have to be included in the final modeling analysis and the requisite model input data for these sources. This list will contain all data required for model input including source location(s), emission rates, stack parameters, and necessary building dimensions for the applicant to determine direction-specific building parameters.

(iv) Background concentration data. Conservative background values are available from the Department for all areas of the state. Should the applicant choose not to use the conservative background values supplied by the Department, the applicant shall be responsible for determining background values based on data normally supplied by and in consultation with the Department. For sources needing more refined background values, general guidance on determining background determinations based on monitoring data is provided in the most recent version of the Department's Guideline Document For Background Air Quality Determinations. Particular care must be taken when determining background values so that they do not implicitly include any impacts of the source(s) being modeled in order to avoid double counting; and
(v) Processed meteorological data base (if required by the Department). The use of five (5) consecutive years of off-site National Weather Service (NWS) meteorological data (or other data equivalent or better in accuracy and detail to the NWS data) or at least 1 year of site specific data is the minimum requirement for modeling applications. If more than one (1) year (and up to five (5) years) of acceptable data is available, it shall be used in the air quality analysis. If there is a gap in data from a catastrophic incident or a persistent but subtle problem that evades detection, a two (2), three (3), four (4) or five (5) year on-site meteorological database acceptable for modeling purposes need not be compiled from two (2), three (3), four (4) or five (5) consecutive years or twenty-four (24), thirty-six (36), forty-eight (48) or sixty (60) consecutive months of data. If this is the case, then the applicant shall write to the Department requesting an exemption from the consecutive two (2), three (3), four (4) or five (5) year database requirement. If data requirements, source configurations or characteristics of the surrounding area change, the database may need to be updated after consultation with the Department. However, a requirement to collect a new database will neither preclude the applicant's ability to use the existing database in the interim data collection period nor require the applicant to redo any previously submitted analyses that used the original database.
(b) Within thirty (30) calendar days of receipt of this information, the Department shall notify the applicant of the following in writing:
(i) The submitted information is complete and acceptable for modeling or the reason(s) why the information is not complete. If the information is not complete, the Department shall clearly identify the changes or additional information that must be submitted to complete the protocol requirements; and
(ii) For each regulated pollutant for which there are significant impacts, the Department shall specify which operating scenarios and other nearby sources, if any, needs to be further modeled.

If the applicant requests in writing, information in the possession of the Department that is required for modeling (for example, emissions which are included in baseline emissions, background data or other emissions data from nearby sources), the Department shall attempt to provide such information to the applicant within thirty (30) calendar days.

(5) Air quality dispersion modeling protocol. If impacts from SO2, NO2, CO, PM2.5 and PM10 are above significance or if there are other regulated pollutants to be modeled, then the applicant must provide in writing to the Department, a description of the following factors (if different from previously submitted data) that the applicant proposes to use in the air quality dispersion modeling (see Appendix W to 40 CFR Part 51 - Guideline on Air Quality Models for more specific guidance):
(a) Operating scenarios, emission units and emissions in English and metric units (including other nearby sources, if necessary);
(b) Regulated air pollutants;
(c) Model(s) and methodologies;
(d) Origin and period of meteorological data, including location of collection site relative to facility, meteorological parameters, instrument height, recovery rates, substitution techniques and QA/QC procedures;
(e) Receptor grid (listing of coordinates and elevations, topographic maps covering the receptor grid area, map of receptors and if applicable, a listing of all Digital Elevation Model (DEM) quadrangles used and method(s) used to convert DEM data to the proposed receptor grid). If DEM data is being used to create a rectangular grid, then the elevation of each receptor shall be the highest within the grid cell. The grid cell is defined as an area enclosed by boundaries located half way to the nearest receptor in each direction;
(f) Any special (e.g., fenceline, air intake or flagpole) receptors;
(g) Identity of emissions which are included in baseline emissions;
(h) A properly scaled plot plan of the proposed facility with clearly marked true north indicator, building heights and an accurate scale ruler. Also, show the location of the source on a map of the area;

NOTE: An original plot plan is preferred but if a photocopy is submitted care should be taken to make sure that the scale is not changed on any area of the plot.

(i) Building dimension and Good Engineering Practice (GEP) analysis techniques. For each stack, all buildings that are large enough and close enough to influence the stack shall be considered in the GEP analysis using the most recent version of any EPA-approved Building Profile Input Program (BPIP) software package. The applicant shall submit all input and output files on media approved by the Department. All tiers of a building will be input as tiers of that building, not as separate buildings; and
(j) Background concentration data.

Within thirty (30) calendar days of receipt of this information, the Department shall notify the applicant in writing that such information is complete and acceptable for modeling or notify the applicant in writing of the reason(s) why the information is not complete. If the information is not complete, the Department shall clearly identify the changes or additional information that must be submitted to complete the protocol requirements.

When all submitted information is considered complete and acceptable for modeling, the applicant shall perform air quality dispersion modeling and submit for review the air quality dispersion modeling analysis as part of the final application submittal.

(6) Presentation of final results

Once compliance with ambient air quality standards, ambient increments and other limitations has been demonstrated through modeling, the applicant shall prepare a written report documenting the source being modeled, the modeling effort, and a compliance demonstration. The following outline indicates the information required in the written report and information required to be submitted on media approved by the Department.

(a) Introduction (briefly give an overview of the project, the analyses conducted, and the results);
(b) Site and surroundings (describe the topography, demography, air quality control region and compliance status (attainment/nonattainment); include a topographic map section showing the site and a properly scaled plot plan of the proposed facility; include rural/urban classification and simple/complex terrain determination), topography and land-use need to be described in sufficient detail to specify roughness length if roughness length is a required input for the modeling system used in the analysis;
(c) Source description (provide an overview of the source, describe the process(es) involved);
(d) Description of each emission unit at the source (describe the equipment/operations, emission controls, emission limits; list emissions and stack parameters for each emission unit in English and metric units);
(e) Screening modeling (describe the screening analyses performed):
(i) Modeling approach/model(s) used;
(ii) Model version used;
(iii) Model switch selections;
(iv) Source data (affected source and other nearby sources);
(v) Meteorological data; and Receptor data; and
(vii) Screening results
(f) Final compliance modeling analysis (describe in detail modeling performed and results):
(i) Modeling approach/model(s) used;
(ii) Model version used;
(iii) Model switch selections;
(iv) Source data (affected source and other nearby sources);
(v) Meteorological data base. The meteorological data base shall be submitted on media approved by the Department if the applicant processed the meteorological data base;
(vi) Receptor data. A map of the receptor grid shall be submitted. (If applicable, all DEM data used to create the receptor grid shall be submitted on media approved by the Department); and
(vii) Modeling results. All input files needed to duplicate the final compliance model runs and all final compliance model output and diagnostic files shall be submitted on media approved by the Department.
(g) Compliance demonstration (describe how the predicted concentrations comply with all applicable ambient air quality standards and ambient increments):
(i) Background determination (include table of values);
(ii) Compliance with ambient air quality standards; and
(iii) Compliance with Class II Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) increments (if applicable).
(h) Class I area impact assessment (if required), (describe any analyses made for federal Class I areas):
(i) Basis for assessment;
(ii) Modeling approach/model(s) used;
(iii) Model version used;
(iv) Model switch selections;
(v) Class I areas affected;
(vi) Emissions and conditions of operating scenarios;
(vii)Meteorological data;
(viii)Receptor grid;
(ix) Computational grid;
(x) Air quality impacts (ambient air quality standards and ambient increments);
(xi) Visibility (plume blight assessment (for regions within a Class I area that are affected by plumes or layers that are viewed against a background (generally within 50 kilometers of the source)) and regional haze assessment (for regions of a Class I area where visibility impairment from the source would cause a general alteration of the appearance of the scene (generally 50 kilometers or more away from the source or from the interaction of the emissions from multiple sources)) and other assessments that the Federal Land Manager and the Department agree should be assessed; and
(xii)All input files needed to duplicate the final Class I analysis model runs and all final Class I analysis model output and diagnostic files shall be submitted on media approved by the Department.

NOTE: The Department recommends that any applicant likely to be required to conduct and submit an air quality dispersion modeling analysis meet once with the Department staff prior to submitting the information specified in subsection 7(E)(5) of this Chapter. A failure by the Department to notify or provide information to the applicant as specified in this subsection does not constitute an approval of the proposed protocol and/or modeling.

NOTE: If a source of NOx is subject to both the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and New Source Review (NSR) thresholds, the source shall comply with the nonattainment area NSR provisions for ozone as well as modeling requirements for the NO2 National Ambient Air Quality Standard, NO2 increment, and Class I areas analyses, etc.

Notes

06- 096 C.M.R. ch. 115, § 7

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