32 Miss. Code. R. § 22-3.14 - POST-SECONDARY EDUCATION SERVICES

  1. § 32-22-3.14.1 - Post-Secondary Training Sponsorship Guidelines
  2. § 32-22-3.14.2 - Accreditation Standards
  3. § 32-22-3.14.3 - Client's Responsibility
  4. § 32-22-3.14.4 - Liaison Counselors/Case Transfer
  5. § 32-22-3.14.5 - Support Services
  6. § 32-22-3.14.6 - (§ 32-22-3.14.6.1 to 32-22-3.14.6.6)

Current through December 27, 2021

Post-secondary education (PSED) includes various training programs in which the Agency clients may choose to participate after completion of their secondary (high school) education. The training should be required for the person to achieve his/her employment objective. This objective should reflect the individual's interests and "informed choice" to the extent these factors are consistent with his/her strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, and capabilities.

When the employment objective has been determined, the counselor and client should investigate job market projections in the occupational area being considered and the various training resources available. It is important to train persons for occupations where there is a reasonable demand projected. The client's willingness to relocate should be explored if job opportunities are more readily available away from the home area. The case file should be documented to reflect this.

The length of the individual training program should not exceed that necessary to prepare the client for entering his/her chosen employment objective. The need for extensions must be substantiated and documented in the case record.

Types of post-secondary education programs:

Academic - Successful completion of course work leads to an Associate in Arts (A.A.), Baccalaureate, or higher degree.

Business - Successful completion of course work leads to a certificate in a particular business skill area (e.g., dictation, tax preparation, typing, shorthand, software application, etc.). It usually provides specific short-term job-related instruction but does not include broad-based academic courses. Courses such as these are not usually accepted for credit by academic degree programs. Business training that leads to an academic or technical degree should be classified as such.

Technical - Successful completion of combined academic and technical course work leads to an Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) or Associate in Advanced Technology (A.A.T.) degree.

Vocational - Successful completion of course work leads to a license or certificate in a specific job skill (e.g., auto mechanics, barber - cosmetology - hair design, computer repair, truck driving, TV repair, welding, etc.) but does not include broad-based academic courses. Courses such as these are not accepted for credit by academic degree programs.

There are short term, highly concentrated training programs for occupations such as auctioneer, gunsmith, taxidermist, etc. that are not offered in state-supported schools. The District Manager should review these programs on an individual basis.

Notes

32 Miss. Code. R. § 22-3.14

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