19 CSR 30-87.030 - Sanitation Requirements for Food Service

Current through Register Vol. 47, No. 7, April 1, 2022

PURPOSE: This rule establishes standards related to food supplies, food protection and storage, food preparation and handling, food service, food equipment and utensils, dishwashing methods and other general requirements related to the food preparation and service area. These rules have been adapted from the 1976 recommended ordinance governing food service establishments and established by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

PUBLISHER'S NOTE: The secretary of state has determined that the publication of the entire text of the material which is incorporated by reference as a portion of this rule would be unduly cumbersome or expensive. This material as incorporated by reference in this rule shall be maintained by the agency at its headquarters and shall be made available to the public for inspection and copying at no more than the actual cost of reproduction. This note applies only to the reference material. The entire text of the rule is printed here.

(1) Employees shall maintain a high degree of personal cleanliness and shall conform to good hygienic practices during all working periods. II/III
(2) Employees shall thoroughly wash their hands and the exposed portions of their arms with soap and warm water before starting work, during work as often as is necessary to keep them clean and after smoking, eating, drinking or using the toilet. Employees shall keep their fingernails clean and trimmed. II/III
(3) The outer clothing of all employees shall be clean and employees shall use effective hair restraints to prevent the contamination of food or food-contact surfaces. III
(4) Employees shall consume food only in designated dining areas. An employee dining area shall not be so designated if consuming food there may result in contamination of other food, equipment, utensils or other items needing protection. Nothing in this section shall prohibit staff from dining with residents when the facility utilizes the social model for mealtime. III
(5) Employees shall not use tobacco in any form while engaged in food preparation or service, nor while in areas used for equipment or utensil washing or for food preparation. Employees shall use tobacco only in designated areas. An employee tobacco-use area shall not be designated for that purpose if the use of tobacco there may result in contamination of food, equipment, utensils or other items needing protection. III
(6) The traffic of unnecessary persons through the food-preparation and utensil-washing areas is prohibited. III
(7) Food preparation and storage shall not be conducted in any room used as living or sleeping quarters. In a facility licensed for more than twelve (12) residents, except in an existing residential care facility, food service operations shall be separated from living or sleeping quarters by complete partitioning and solid, self-closing doors. Nothing in this section shall prohibit an assisted living facility from providing kitchen and family style eating areas for use by residents. III
(8) Maintenance and cleaning tools such as brooms, mops, vacuum cleaners and similar equipment shall be maintained and stored in a way that does not contaminate food, utensils, equipment or linens and shall be stored in an orderly manner. III
(9) Live animals, including birds and turtles shall be excluded from the food storage service and preparation areas. This exclusion does not apply to edible fish, crustacea, shellfish or to fish in aquariums. Patrol dogs accompanying security or police officers, or service or guide dogs assisting residents or visitors shall be permitted in dining areas. Other dogs and cats may be permitted in the dining area if food service sanitation is not compromised and residents do not object. III
(10) Birds within enclosed aviaries may be in the dining area with the following stipulations:
(A) The facility ensures the aviary is cleaned at least twice a week and more often as needed to maintain a clean environment; III
(B) The facility provides proper hand washing instructions to those staff having access to the birds and monitors to ensure compliance; and III
(C) The facility contacts the local or county Health Department and informs that department that an aviary has been installed. III
(11) Food shall be in sound condition, free from spoilage, filth or other contamination and shall be safe for human consumption. Food shall be obtained from sources that comply with all laws relating to food and food labeling. The use of food in hermetically sealed containers that was not prepared in a food processing establishment is prohibited. Nothing in this section shall prohibit facilities from using fresh vegetables or fruits purchased from farmers' markets or obtained from the facility garden or residents' family gardens. I/II
(12) Fluid milk and fluid milk products used or served shall be pasteurized and shall meet the Grade A quality standards as established by law. Dry milk and dry milk products shall be made from pasteurized milk products. I/II
(13) At all times, including while being stored, prepared, displayed, served or transported to or from the facility, food shall be protected from potential contamination, including dust, insects, rodents, unclean equipment and utensils, unnecessary handling, coughs and sneezes, flooding, drainage and overhead leakage or overhead drippage from condensation. The temperature of potentially hazardous food shall be forty-five degrees Fahrenheit (45oF) or below or one hundred forty degrees Fahrenheit (140oF) or above at all times, except as otherwise provided in this section. In the event of a fire, flood, power outage or similar event that might result in the contamination of food, or that might prevent potentially hazardous food from being held at required temperatures, the person in charge shall immediately contact the Department of Health and Senior Services (the department). Upon receiving notice of this occurrence, the department shall take whatever action that it deems necessary to protect the residents. II/III
(14) Food, whether raw or prepared, if removed from the container or package in which it was obtained, shall be stored in a clean covered container except during necessary periods of preparation or service. Container covers shall be impervious and nonabsorbent except that linens or napkins may be used for lining or covering bread or roll containers. III
(15) Containers of food shall be stored above the floor in a manner that protects the food from splash and other contamination and that permits easy cleaning of the storage area, except that metal pressurized beverage containers, and cased food packaged in cans, glass or other waterproof containers need not be elevated when the food container is not exposed to floor moisture; and containers may be stored on dollies, racks or pallets, provided the equipment is easily movable. III
(16) Food and containers of food shall be stored in a manner which protect it from contamination. The storage of food in toilet rooms or vestibules is prohibited. II/III
(17) Unless its identity is unmistakable, bulk food, such as cooking oil, syrup, salt, sugar or flour not stored in the product container or package in which it was obtained, shall be stored in a container identifying the food by common name. III
(18) Enough conveniently located refrigeration facilities or effectively insulated facilities shall be provided to assure the maintenance of potentially hazardous food at required temperatures during storage. Each mechanically refrigerated facility storing potentially hazardous food shall be provided with a numerically scaled indicating thermometer, accurate to plus or minus three degrees Fahrenheit (+-3oF), located to measure the air temperature in the warmest part of the refrigerated facility and located to be easily readable. Recording thermometers, accurate to plus or minus three degrees Fahrenheit (+-3oF), may be used in lieu of indicating thermometers. III
(19) Potentially hazardous food requiring refrigeration after preparation shall be rapidly cooled to an internal temperature of forty-five degrees Fahrenheit (45oF) or below, utilizing such methods as shallow pans, agitation, quick chilling or water circulation external to the food container so that the cooling period shall not exceed four (4) hours. Potentially hazardous food to be transported shall be prechilled and held at a temperature of forty-five degrees Fahrenheit (45oF) or below. I/II
(20) Frozen food shall be kept frozen and should be stored at a temperature of zero degrees Fahrenheit (0oF) or below. III
(21) Ice intended for human consumption shall not be used as a medium for cooling stored food, food containers or food utensils, except that such ice may be used for cooling tubes conveying beverages or beverage ingredients to a dispenser head. Ice used for cooling stored food and food containers shall not be used for human consumption. III
(22) Tubing conveying beverages or beverage ingredients to dispensing heads may be in contact with stored ice provided that, the tubing is fabricated from safe materials, is grom-meted at entry and exit points to preclude moisture (condensation) from entering the ice machine or the ice storage bin and is kept clean. Drainage or drainage tubes from dispensing units shall not pass through the ice machine or the ice storage bin. III
(23) Enough conveniently located hot food storage facilities shall be provided to assure the maintenance of food at the required temperature during storage. Each hot food facility storing potentially hazardous food shall be provided with a numerically scaled indicating thermometer, accurate to plus or minus three degrees Fahrenheit (+-3oF), located to measure the air temperature in the coolest part of the hot food storage facility and located to be easily readable. Recording thermometers, accurate to plus or minus three degrees Fahrenheit (+-3oF), may be used in lieu of indicating thermometers. Where it is impractical to install thermometers on equipment such as bains-maries, steam tables, steam kettles, heat lamps, calrod units or insulated food transport carriers, a product thermometer must be available and used to check internal food temperature. III
(24) The internal temperature of potentially hazardous foods requiring hot storage shall be one hundred forty degrees Fahrenheit (140oF) or above, except during periods of preparation. Potentially hazardous food to be transported shall be held at a temperature of one hundred forty degrees Fahrenheit (140oF) or above. I/II
(25) Raw fruits and vegetables shall be thoroughly washed with potable water before being cooked or served. II/III
(26) Potentially hazardous foods requiring cooking shall be cooked to heat all parts of the food to a temperature of at least one hundred forty degrees Fahrenheit (140oF), except that poultry, poultry stuffings, stuffed meats and stuffings containing meat shall be cooked to heat all parts of the food to at least one hundred sixty-five degrees Fahrenheit (165oF) with no interruption of the cooking process. Pork and food containing pork shall be cooked to heat all parts of the food to at least one hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit (150oF); rare roast beef shall be cooked to an internal temperature of at least one hundred thirty degrees Fahrenheit (130oF); and rare beef steak shall be cooked to a temperature of one hundred thirty degrees Fahrenheit (130oF) unless otherwise ordered by the resident. II/III
(27) Liquid, frozen, dry eggs and egg products shall be used only for cooking and baking purposes. II/III
(28) Only clean whole eggs, with shell intact and without cracks or checks, or pasteurized liquid or frozen, or dry eggs or pasteurized dry egg products shall be used, except that hard-boiled, peeled eggs, commercially prepared and packaged, may be used. II
(29) Potentially hazardous foods that have been cooked and then refrigerated shall be reheated rapidly to one hundred sixty-five degrees Fahrenheit (165oF) or higher throughout before being served or before being placed in a hot food-storage facility. II
(30) Steam tables, bains-maries, warmers and similar hot food-holding facilities are prohibited for the rapid reheating of potentially hazardous foods. II/III
(31) Nondairy creaming, whitening or whipping agents may be reconstituted on the premises only when they will be stored in sanitized, covered containers not exceeding one (1) gallon in capacity and cooled to forty-five degrees Fahrenheit (45oF) or below within four (4) hours after preparation. II/III
(32) Metal stem-type numerically scaled indicating thermometers, accurate to plus or minus two degrees Fahrenheit (+-2oF), shall be provided and used to assure the attainment and maintenance of proper internal cooking, holding or refrigeration temperatures of all potentially hazardous foods. II/III
(33) Potentially hazardous foods shall be thawed in refrigerated units at a temperature not to exceed forty-five degrees Fahrenheit (45oF); or under potable running water at a temperature of seventy degrees Fahrenheit (70oF) or below, with sufficient water velocity to agitate and float off loose food particles into the overflow; or in a microwave oven only when the food will be immediately transferred to conventional cooking facilities as part of a continuous cooking process or when the entire, uninterrupted cooking process takes place in the microwave oven; or as part of the conventional cooking process. II/III
(34) At time of service to the resident, food shall be at least one hundred twenty degrees Fahrenheit (120oF) or forty-five degrees Fahrenheit (45oF) or below. II/III
(35) Milk and milk products for drinking purposes shall be provided to the resident in an unopened, commercially filled package not exceeding one (1) pint in capacity, or shall be drawn from a commercially filled container stored in a mechanically refrigerated bulk milk dispenser, or shall be poured directly into glass(es) to be used by the resident(s) from a commercially filled gallon or half-gallon container provided the container is completely emptied in the process and then discarded, or if a portion of milk remains, that no milk may be returned to that container and is immediately refrigerated. Where a bulk dispenser for milk and milk products is not available and portions of less than one-half (1/2) pint are required for mixed drinks, cereal or dessert service, milk and milk products may be poured from a commercially filled container of not more than one (1) gallon capacity and no milk may be returned to that container. II/III
(36) Reconstituted dry milk and dry milk products shall not be used for drinking purposes but may be used in instant desserts and whipped products, or for cooking and baking purposes. III
(37) Cream or half-and-half or nondairy creaming agents or whitening agents shall be provided in an individual service container, protected pour-type pitcher or drawn from a refrigerated dispenser designed for such service. III
(38) Condiments, seasoning and dressings for self-service use shall be provided in individual packages, from dispensers or from protected containers. III
(39) Condiments provided for table or counter service shall be individually portioned, except that catsup and other sauces may be served in the original container or pour-type dispenser. Sugar for consumer shall be provided in individual packages or in pour-type dispensers. III
(40) Ice shall be dispensed only with scoops, tongs or other ice-dispensing utensils or through automatic self-service, ice-dispensing equipment. Ice-dispensing utensils shall be stored on a clean surface or in the ice with the dispensing utensil's handle extended out of the ice. Between uses, ice transfer receptacles shall be stored in a way that protects them from contamination. Ice storage bins shall be drained through an air gap. III
(41) To avoid unnecessary manual contact with food, suitable preparation and dispensing utensils shall be used by employees or provided to consumers who serve themselves. Between uses, during service, dispensing utensils shall be stored in a manner which would prevent contamination. III
(42) Once served to a resident, portions of leftover food shall not be served again except that packaged food, other than potentially hazardous food, that is still packaged and is still in sound condition may be re-served. III
(43) Food on display shall be protected from resident contamination by the use of packaging or by the use of easily cleanable counter, serving line or salad bar protector devices, display cases or by other effective means. Enough hot or cold food facilities shall be available to maintain the required temperature of potentially hazardous foods on display. III
(44) Equipment and utensils shall be constructed and repaired with safe materials including finishing materials; shall be corrosion-resistant and nonabsorbent; and shall be smooth, easily cleanable and durable under conditions of normal use. Single-service articles shall be made from clean, sanitary, safe materials. Equipment utensils and single-service articles shall not impart odors, color or taste nor contribute to the contamination of food. III
(45) Hard maple or equivalently nonab-sorbent material may be used for cutting blocks, cutting boards, salad bowls and baker's tables. The use of wood as a food-contact surface under other circumstances is prohibited. III
(46) Safe plastic or safe rubber or safe rubber-like materials that are resistant under normal conditions of use to scratching, scoring, decomposition, crazing, chipping and distortion, that are of sufficient weight and thickness to permit cleaning and sanitizing by normal dishwashing methods, and which meet the general requirements of this rule, are permitted for repeated use. III
(47) Re-use of single service articles is prohibited. III
(48) Food-contact surfaces shall be easily cleanable, smooth and free of breaks, open seams, cracks, chips, pits and similar imperfections and free of difficult-to-clean internal corners and crevices. Cast iron may be used as a food-contact surface only if the surface is heated, such as in grills, griddle tops and skillets. Threads shall be designed to facilitate cleaning; ordinary "V" type threads are prohibited in food-contact surfaces, except that in equipment such as ice makers or hot oil-cooking equipment and hot oil-filtering systems, these threads shall be minimized. III
(49) Equipment containing bearings and gears requiring unsafe lubricants shall be designed and constructed so that the lubricant cannot leak, drip or be forced into food or onto food-contact surfaces. Only safe lubricants shall be used on equipment designed to receive lubrication of bearings and gears on or within food-contact surfaces. III
(50) All sinks and drain boards shall be self-draining. III
(51) Unless designed for in-place cleaning, food-contact surfaces shall be accessible for cleaning and inspection without being disassembled; or by disassembling without the use of tools; or by easy disassembling with the use of only simple tools such as a mallet, a screwdriver or an open-end wrench kept available near the equipment. III
(52) Equipment intended for in-place cleaning shall be so designed and fabricated that cleaning and sanitizing solutions can be circulated throughout a fixed system using an effective cleaning and sanitizing regimen; cleaning and sanitizing solutions will contact all interior food-contact surfaces; and the system is self-draining or capable of being completely evacuated. III
(53) Fixed equipment designed and fabricated to be cleaned and sanitized by pressure spray methods shall have sealed electrical wiring, switches and connections. III
(54) Surfaces of equipment not intended for contact with food, but which are exposed to splash or food debris or which otherwise require frequent cleaning, shall be designed and fabricated to be smooth, washable, free of unnecessary ledges, projections or crevices, and readily accessible for cleaning, and shall be of such material and in a repair as to be easily maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. III
(55) Ventilation hoods and devices shall be designed to prevent grease or condensation from collecting on walls and ceilings and from dripping into food or onto food-contact surfaces. Filters or other grease-extracting equipment shall be readily removable for cleaning and replacement if not designed to be cleaned in place. III
(56) Equipment that was installed in an existing licensed facility and that does not fully meet all of the design and fabrication requirements shall be deemed acceptable in that establishment if it is in good repair, capable of being maintained in a sanitary condition and the food-contact surfaces are nontoxic. Replacement equipment and new equipment shall meet the requirements for design and fabrication. III
(57) Equipment that is placed on tables or counters, unless portable, shall be sealed to the table or counter or elevated on legs to provide clearance between the table or counter and equipment and shall be installed to facilitate the cleaning of the equipment adjacent areas. Equipment is portable if it is small and light enough to be moved easily by one (1) person; and it has no utility connection, or has a utility connection that disconnects quickly, or has a flexible utility connection line of sufficient length to permit the equipment to be moved for easy cleaning. III
(58) Floor-mounted equipment, unless readily movable, shall be sealed to the floor; or installed on a raised platform of concrete or other smooth masonry in a way that meets all of the requirements for sealing or floor clearance; or elevated on legs to provide clearance between the floor and equipment, except that vertically-mounted floor mixers may be elevated to provide at least a four inch (4")-clearance between the floor and equipment if no part of the floor under the mixer is more than six inches (6") from the cleaning access. Equipment is easily movable if it is mounted on wheels or casters; and it has no utility connection or has a utility connection that disconnects quickly, or has a flexible utility line of sufficient length to permit the equipment to be moved for easy cleaning. III
(59) Unless sufficient space is provided for easy cleaning between, behind and above each unit of fixed equipment, the space between it and adjoining equipment units and adjacent walls or ceilings shall not be more than one-thirty-second inch (1/32"); or if exposed to seepage, the equipment shall be sealed to the adjoining equipment or adjacent walls or ceilings. III
(60) Aisles and working spaces between units of equipment and walls shall be unobstructed and of sufficient width to permit employees to perform their duties readily without contamination of food or food-contact surfaces by clothing or personal contact. All easily movable storage equipment such as pallets, racks and dollies shall be positioned to provide accessibility to working areas. III
(61) Tableware shall be washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use. II
(62) Kitchenware and food-contact surfaces of equipment shall be washed, rinsed and sanitized after each use and following any interruption of operations during which time contamination may have occurred. Water pitchers which are for individual resident use shall be sanitized daily. II/III
(63) Where equipment and utensils are used for the preparation of potentially hazardous foods on a continuous or production-line basis, utensils and the food-contact surfaces of equipment shall be washed, rinsed and sanitized at intervals throughout the day on a schedule based on food temperature, type of food and amount of food particle accumulation. III
(64) The food-contact surfaces of grills, griddles and similar cooking devices and the cavities and door seals of microwave ovens shall be cleaned at least once a day, except that this shall not apply to hot oil-cooking equipment and hot oil-filtering systems. The food-contact surfaces of all cooking equipment shall be kept free of encrusted grease deposits and other accumulated soil. III
(65) Nonfood-contact surfaces of equipment shall be cleaned as often as is necessary to keep the equipment free of accumulation of dust, dirt, food particles and other debris. III
(66) Cloths used for wiping food spills on tableware, such as plates or bowls being served to the consumer, shall be clean, dry and used for no other purpose. III
(67) Moist cloths or sponges used for wiping food spills on kitchenware and food-contact surfaces of equipment shall be clean and rinsed frequently in one (1) of the permitted sanitizing solutions and used for no other purpose. These cloths and sponges shall be stored in the sanitizing solution between uses. Moist cloths or sponges used for cleaning nonfood-contact surfaces of equipment such as counters, dining table tops and shelves shall be clean and rinsed and used for no other purpose. These cloths and sponges shall be stored in the sanitizing solution between uses. III
(68) For manual washing, rinsing and sanitizing of utensils and equipment, a sink with not fewer than three (3) compartments shall be provided and used. Sink compartments shall be large enough to permit the accommodation of the equipment and utensils and each compartment of the sink shall be supplied with hot and cold potable running water, except that in an existing licensed facility, the use of a two (2)-vat sink and a supplementary portable container to be used for sanitization is acceptable. Fixed equipment and utensils and equipment too large to be cleaned in sink compartment shall be washed manually or cleaned through pressure spray methods. III
(69) Drain boards or easily movable dish tables of adequate size shall be provided for proper handling of soiled utensils prior to washing and for cleaned utensils following sanitizing and shall be located so as not to interfere with the proper use of the dishwashing facilities. III
(70) Equipment and utensils shall be pre-flushed or prescraped and, when necessary, presoaked to remove gross food particles and soil. III
(71) Except for fixed equipment and utensils too large to be cleaned in sink compartments, manual washing, rinsing and sanitizing shall be conducted in the following sequence: sinks shall be cleaned prior to use; equipment and utensils shall be thoroughly washed in the first compartment with hot detergent solution that is kept clean; equipment and utensils shall be rinsed free of detergent and abrasives with clean water in the second compartment; and equipment and utensils shall be sanitized in the third compartment. III
(72) The food-contact surfaces of all equipment and utensils shall be sanitized by immersion for at least one-half (1/2) minute in clean, hot water at a temperature of at least one hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit (170oF); or immersion for at least one (1) minute in a clean solution containing at least fifty (50) parts per million of available chlorine as a hypochlorite and at a temperature of at least seventy-five degrees Fahrenheit (75oF); or immersion for at least one (1) minute in a clean solution containing at least twelve and one-half (12.5) parts per million of available iodine and having a pH not higher than five (5.0) and at a temperature of at least seventy-five degrees Fahrenheit (75oF); or immersion in a clean solution containing any other chemical sanitizing agent allowed under 21 CFR 178.1010 of the (Revised 2005), Food and Drug Code of the United States Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: 202-619-0257, Toll Free: 1-877-696-6775, that will provide the equivalent bactericidal effect of a solution containing at least fifty (50) parts per million of available chlorine as a hypochlorite at a temperature of at least seventy-five degrees Fahrenheit (75oF); or treatment with steam, free from materials or additives other than those specified in 21 CFR 173.310 of the (Revised 2005), Food and Drug Code of the of the United States Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, in the case of equipment too large to sanitize by immersion, but in which steam can be confined; or rinsing, spraying or swabbing with a chemical sanitizing solution of at least twice the strength required for that particular sanitizing solution in the case of equipment too large to sanitize by immersion. ( 21 CFR 178.1010 (Revised 2005) and 21 CFR 173.310 (Revised 2005) are incorporated by reference in this rule and available by Internet at: www.access.gpo.gov. This rule does not incorporate any subsequent amendments or additions.) II/III
(73) When hot water is used for sanitizing, as allowed by section (72) of this rule, the following facilities shall be provided and used: an integral heating device or fixture installed in, on or under the sanitizing compartment of the sink capable of maintaining the water at a temperature of at least one hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit (170oF); and a numerically scaled indicating thermometer, accurate to plus or minus three degrees Fahrenheit (+-3oF), convenient to the sink for frequent checks of water temperature; and dish baskets of such size and design to permit complete immersion of the tableware, kitchenware and equipment in the hot water. II/III
(74) When chemicals are used for sanitiza-tion, they shall not have concentrations higher than the maximum permitted under 21 CFR 178.1010 of the (Revised 2005), Food and Drug Code of the United States Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services, and a test kit or other device that accurately measures the parts per million concentration of the solution shall be provided and used. III
(75) Cleaning and sanitizing may be done by spray-type or immersion dishwashing machines or by any other type of machine or device if it is demonstrated that it thoroughly cleans and sanitizes equipment and utensils. In a facility with a licensed capacity of twelve (12) or fewer beds, a home-type dishwashing machine shall be acceptable. If a new machine is purchased, it shall be one with sanitizing capabilities. In a facility licensed for a larger capacity, if a dishwasher is used, it shall meet the requirements in sections (72)-(74) of this rule. Machines and devices shall be properly installed and maintained in good repair; shall be operated in accordance with manufacturers' instructions; and utensils and equipment placed in the machine shall be exposed to all dishwashing cycles. Automatic detergent dispensers, wetting agent dispensers and liquid sanitizer injectors, if any, shall be properly installed and maintained. II/III
(76) The pressure of final rinse water supplied to spray-type dishwashing machines shall not be less than fifteen (15) nor more than twenty-five (25) pounds per square inch measured in the water line immediately adjacent to the final rinse control valve. A one-fourth inch (1/4") IPS valve shall be provided immediately upstream from the final rinse control valve to permit checking the flow pressure of the final rinse water. III
(77) Machine- or water line-mounted numerically scaled indicating thermometers, accurate to plus or minus three degrees Fahrenheit (+-3oF), shall be provided to indicate the temperature of the water in each tank of the machine and the temperature of the final rinse water as it enters the manifold. III
(78) Rinse water tanks shall be protected by baffles, curtains or other effective means of minimizing the entry of wash water into the rinse water. Conveyors in dishwashing machines shall be accurately timed to assure proper exposure times in wash and rinse cycles in accordance with manufacturers' specifications attached to the machines. III
(79) Drain boards shall be provided and be of adequate size for the proper handling of soiled utensils prior to washing and of cleaned utensils following sanitization and shall be so located and constructed as not to interfere with the proper use of the dishwashing facilities. This does not preclude the use of easily movable dish tables for the storage of soiled utensils or the use of each movable dish table for the storage of clean utensils following sanitization. III
(80) Equipment and utensils shall be flushed or scraped and, when necessary, soaked to remove gross food particles and soil prior to being washed in a dishwashing machine unless a prewash cycle is a part of the dishwashing machine operation. Equipment and utensils shall be placed in racks, trays or baskets, or on conveyors, in a way that food-contact surfaces are exposed to the unobstructed application of detergent wash and clean rinse waters and that permits free draining. III
(81) Machines (single-tank, stationary-rack, door-type machines and spray-type glass washes) using chemicals for sanitization may be used provided that-the temperature of the wash water is not less than one hundred twenty degrees Fahrenheit (120oF), the wash water is kept clean, chemicals added for san-itization purposes are automatically dispensed; utensils and equipment are exposed to the final chemical sanitizing rinse in accordance with manufacturers' specifications for time and concentration, the chemical sanitizing rinse water temperature is not less than seventy-five degrees Fahrenheit (75oF) nor less than the temperature specified by the machine's manufacturer; chemical sanitizers used shall meet the requirements of 21 CFR 178.1010 (Revised 2005), Food and Drug Code of the United States Food and Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services and a test kit or other device that accurately measures the parts per million concentration of the solution is available and is used. II/III
(82) Machines using hot water for sanitizing may be used provided that they are operated in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions and are maintained in good repair. II/III
(83) All dishwashing machines shall be thoroughly cleaned at least once a day or more often when necessary to maintain them in a satisfactory operating condition. III
(84) After mechanical or manual sanitization, all equipment and utensils shall be air dried.

All utensils shall be stored in a self-draining position. III

(85) Cleaned and sanitized equipment and utensils shall be handled in a way that protects them from contamination. Spoons, knives and forks shall be touched only by their handles. Cups, glasses, bowls, plates and similar items shall be handled without contact with inside surfaces or surfaces that contact the user's mouth. III
(86) Cleaned and sanitized utensils and equipment shall be stored above the floor in a clean, dry location in a way that protects them from contamination by splash, dust and other means. The food-contact surfaces of fixed equipment shall also be protected from contamination. III
(87) Glasses and cups shall be stored inverted. Other stored utensils shall be covered or inverted, wherever practical. Facilities for the storage of knives, forks and spoons shall be designed and used to present the handle to the employee or consumer. Unless tableware is prewrapped, holders for knives, forks and spoons at self-service locations shall protect these articles from contamination and present the handle of the utensil to the consumer. III
(88) Single-service articles shall be stored above the floor in closed cartons or containers which protect them from contamination. III
(89) Single-service articles shall be handled and dispensed in a manner that prevents contamination of surfaces which may come in contact with food or with the mouth of the user. III
(90) Single-service knives, forks and spoons packaged in bulk shall be inserted into holders or be wrapped by a person who has washed his/her hands immediately prior to sorting or wrapping utensils. Unless single-service knives, forks and spoons are prewrapped or prepackaged, holders shall be provided to protect these items from contamination. III
(91) Prohibited Storage Area. The storage of food equipment, utensils or single-service articles in toilet rooms or vestibules is prohibited. III
(92) All storage and installation of equipment under exposed sewage or water line, except for automatic fire protection sprinkler heads, is prohibited. II
(93) Permanently fixed artificial light sources shall be installed to provide at least twenty (20) footcandles of light on all food preparation surfaces and at equipment or utensil-washing work levels. III
(94) Permanently fixed artificial light sources shall be installed to provide, at a distance of thirty inches (30") from the floor, at least twenty (20) footcandles of light in utensil and equipment storage areas and in lavatory and toilet areas, and at least ten (10) footcandles of light in walk-in refrigerating units, dry food-storage areas and in all other areas. This shall also include dining areas during cleaning operations. III
(95) Shielding to protect against broken glass falling onto food shall be provided for all artificial lighting fixtures located over, by or within food storage, preparation, service and display facilities, and facilities where utensils and equipment are cleaned and stored. III
(96) Infrared or other heat lamps shall be protected against breakage by a shield surrounding and extending beyond the bulb, leaving only the face of the bulb exposed. III
(97) Nothing in this rule shall prohibit a facility from hosting a resident/family picnic, carry-in dinner, fish fry or barbecue or allowing a local community or church group to sponsor such activities for residents. Reasonable practices shall be used for maintaining sanitation and appropriate temperatures of food brought to the facility. III

Notes

19 CSR 30-87.030
AUTHORITY: sections 198.009, 198.076 and 198.079, RSMo 2000 and 198.005 and 198.073, RSMo Supp. 2006.* This rule originally filed as 13 CSR 15-17.030. Original rule filed July 13, 1983, effective Oct. 13, 1983. Emergency amendment filed Aug. 1, 1984, effective Aug. 13, 1984, expired Dec. 10, 1984. Amended: Filed Sept. 12, 1984, effective Dec. 13, 1984. Amended: Filed Aug. 1, 1988, effective Nov. 11 , 1988. Moved to 19 CSR 30-87.030, effective Aug. 28, 2001. Amended: Filed Aug. 23, 2006, effective April 30, 2007.

All rules relating to long-term care facilities licensed by the department are followed by a Roman Numeral notation which refers to the class (either Class I, II or III) of standard as designated in section 198.085.1, RSMo.

*Original authority: 198.005, RSMo 2006; 198.009, RSMo 1979, amended 1993, 1995; 198.073, RSMo 1979, amended 1984, 1992, 1999, 2006; 198.076, RSMo 1979, amended 1984; and 198.079, RSMo 1979.

The following state regulations pages link to this page.



State regulations are updated quarterly; we currently have two versions available. Below is a comparison between our most recent version and the prior quarterly release. More comparison features will be added as we have more versions to compare.