Nev. Admin. Code § 467.796 - Method of judging

Current through March 28, 2022

1. Each judge of a contest or exhibition of mixed martial arts that is being judged shall score the contest or exhibition and determine the winner through the use of a 10-point system. Under this system:
(a) If the unarmed combatants have competed for the entire round and there is no difference or advantage between the unarmed combatants, each unarmed combatant receives 10 points. This result is referred to as a 10-10 round and is subject to the following principles:
(1) A score of a 10-10 round should be extremely rare.
(2) A judge shall not score a round as a 10-10 round as an excuse because the judge cannot or will not assess the differences in the round.
(3) It is necessary to have a 10-10 round as a possible score, such as for scoring an incomplete round.
(4) If there is any discernible difference between the two unarmed combatants during the round, a judge shall not score the round as a 10-10 round.
(b) If an unarmed combatant wins the round by a close margin, the winning unarmed combatant receives 10 points, and the losing unarmed combatant receives 9 points. This result is referred to as a 10-9 round and is subject to the following principles:
(1) If a judge determines that an unarmed combatant has landed better strikes or utilized effective grappling during the round, even if by just one technique over the unarmed combatant's opponent, the judge shall score the round as a 10-9 round.
(2) A score of a 10-9 round is the most common score a judge assesses during a bout.
(3) It is imperative that a judge understand that a score of 9 should not be automatically given to the losing unarmed combatant of the round. A judge shall consider whether the losing unarmed combatant:
(I) Engaged in offensive actions during the round;
(II) Competed with the attitude of attempting to win the round; or
(III) Competed with the attitude of attempting just to survive the offensive actions of his or her opponent.
(c) If an unarmed combatant wins the round by a large margin, the winning unarmed combatant receives 10 points, and the losing unarmed combatant receives 8 points. This result is referred to as a 10-8 round and is subject to the following principles:
(1) For a round to be scored as a 10-8 round, the winning unarmed combatant must have:
(I) Dominated the action of the round;
(II) Had duration of the domination; and
(III) Impacted his or her opponent with effective strikes or effective grappling maneuvers, or both, that diminished the abilities of his or her opponent.
(2) A score of a 10-8 round is not the most common score for a round, but it is absolutely essential to the evolution of mixed martial arts and fairness to unarmed combatants that a judge understand and effectively use the score of a 10-8 round.
(3) A score of a 10-8 round does not require an unarmed combatant to dominate or to impact his or her opponent, or both, for the entire round.
(4) A score of a 10-8 round must be used by a judge when the judge sees verifiable results on the part of the unarmed combatant or both unarmed combatants.
(5) If an unarmed combatant has little or no offensive output during the round, the judge should normally award 8 points to the losing unarmed combatant instead of 9 points.
(6) In determining whether to score a round as a 10-8 round, a judge shall evaluate the three factors of impact, dominance and duration. If the judge assesses that two of the three factors are present, the judge shall seriously consider whether to score the round as a 10-8 round. If all three factors are present, the judge shall score the round as a 10-8 round.
(d) If one unarmed combatant completely overwhelms his or her opponent in effective striking or grappling, or both, and a stoppage of the bout may have been warranted, the winning unarmed combatant receives 10 points, and the losing unarmed combatant receives 7 points. This result is referred to as a 10-7 round and is subject to the following principles:
(1) For a round to be scored as a 10-7 round, the winning unarmed combatant must have:
(I) Landed multiple blows that diminished the unarmed combatant's opponent or executed grappling maneuvers that placed the unarmed combatant in dominant situations with impact being inflicted that visibly diminished the ability of the unarmed combatant's opponent to compete; and
(II) Overwhelmingly dominated the unarmed combatant's opponent during the entire round and inflicted such significant impact on the unarmed combatant's opponent that, at times, caused the judge to consider that the fight could have been stopped.
(2) A score of a 10-7 round should rarely be given by a judge.
(e) Each judge of a contest or exhibition of mixed martial arts that is being judged shall use the following judging criteria and priority for scoring a round:
(1) The judge shall first assess whether one of the unarmed combatants has an advantage in effective striking or grappling, or both.
(2) If, and only if, effective striking and grappling are even, the judge shall next assess effective aggression to determine the winner of the round. The judge shall not assess or consider effective aggression if effective striking and grappling are not even.
(3) If, and only if, the round is still even after considering the criteria set forth in subparagraphs (1) and (2), the judge shall assess cage or ring control to determine the winner of the round The judge shall not assess or consider cage or ring control if the criteria set forth in subparagraphs (1) and (2) are not even.

In assessing the effectiveness of striking, grappling or aggressiveness when an unarmed combatant is in the top position or bottom position, the effectiveness of the unarmed combatant must be based upon the impactful or effective result of his or her actions, not merely whether the unarmed combatant is in the top position or bottom position.

(f) No fraction of points may be given.
(g) Points for each round must be awarded immediately after the end of the period of unarmed combat in the round.
2. After the end of the contest or exhibition, the announcer shall pick up the scores of the judges from the Commission's desk.
3. The majority opinion is conclusive and, if there is no majority, the decision is a draw.
4. When the Commission's representative has checked the scores, he or she shall inform the announcer of the decision. The announcer shall inform the audience of the decision over the speaker system.
5. For the purposes of this section:
(a) "Cage or ring control" must be assessed by determining which unarmed combatant is dictating the pace, place and position of the bout.
(b) "Dominance" means:
(1) With respect to striking, when the unarmed combatant forces his or her opponent continually to defend, with no counters or reaction taken when openings present themselves.
(2) With respect to grappling, when an unarmed combatant takes dominant positions in the bout and utilizes those positions to attempt submissions to end the bout or to attack. Merely holding a dominant position must not be a primary factor in assessing dominance, but rather it is what the unarmed combatant does while holding those dominant positions that must be assessed.
(c) "Duration" means the time spent by one unarmed combatant effectively attacking, controlling and impacting his or her opponent, while his or her opponent offers little or no offensive output. A judge shall assess duration by recognizing the relative time in a round when one unarmed combatant takes and maintains full control of the effective offense. Duration may be assessed both standing and grounded.
(d) "Effective aggressiveness" means effectively and aggressively making attempts to finish the bout, with an emphasis on the effectiveness of such attempts. Chasing after an opponent with no effective result or impact must not be factored into a judge's assessment of effective aggressiveness.
(e) "Effective grappling" means the successful execution of takedowns, submission attempts and reversals and the achievement of advantageous positions that produce immediate or cumulative impact with the potential to contribute to the end of the match, with the immediacy of the impact being weighed more heavily than the cumulativeness of the impact.
(f) "Effective striking" means legal blows that have an immediate or cumulative impact with the potential to contribute to the end of the match, with the immediacy of the impact being weighed more heavily than the cumulativeness of the impact.
(g) "Impact" assesses whether an unarmed combatant impacts his or her opponent significantly in the round even if the unarmed combatant may not have dominated the action in the round. It is assessed by observing visible evidence such as swelling or lacerations. It is also assessed when an unarmed combatant's actions using striking or grappling, or both, lead to a diminishing of his or her opponent's energy, confidence, abilities and spirit. When an unarmed combatant is impacted by strikes, by lack of control or ability, it can create defining moments in the round and must be assessed with great value.

Notes

Nev. Admin. Code § 467.796
Added to NAC by Athletic Comm'n by R070-01, eff. 8-31-2001; A by R032-18A, eff. 1/30/2019
NRS 467.030

The following state regulations pages link to this page.



State regulations are updated quarterly; we currently have two versions available. Below is a comparison between our most recent version and the prior quarterly release. More comparison features will be added as we have more versions to compare.