N.M. Code R. § 6.29.11.16 - ANCHOR STANDARDS AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR EIGHTH GRADE

A. Civics.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of civic and political institutions by:
(a) comparing indigenous government structures to those of the United States today;
(b) describing the ways indigenous people organize themselves and their societies;
(c) discussing the relationship between a ruler of a nation-state and the citizens of its colonies;
(d) examining how challenges the government faced because of the articles of confederation resolved at the constitutional convention;
(e) evaluating how individuals and groups addressed specific problems at various levels to form a new republic;
(f) identifying and applying the function of the bill of rights; and
(g) discussing the nature of civil wars in general, and the role of border states and territories in the United States civil war specifically, and exploring the role the territory of New Mexico played.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of processes, rules, and laws by:
(a) identifying policies of this era that define the relationship between federal, state, and tribal governments through treaties, court decisions, and land acquisition statutes;
(b) evaluating the efficacy of formal United States policies of expansion, their effects on sovereign tribal nations' ability to self-govern, and indigenous resistance efforts to preserve tribal sovereignty;
(c) comparing the federal government's response to the southern states' call for independence with that of the original 13 colonies;
(d) discussing the impact of significant legislation and judicial precedents in formally perpetuating systemic oppression; and
(e) analyzing the impact of individuals and reform movements that advocated for greater civil rights and liberties throughout early United States history.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of civic dispositions and democratic principles by:
(a) describing the role of community members in ensuring the long-term survival of their community, including cooperation, obligations, rights, and responsibilities;
(b) assessing the responses of various groups to British policies in the 13 colonies;
(c) identifying parallels in language or intent (i.e. construct or content) between enlightenment philosophies and the ideas expressed in the founding documents of the United States;
(d) citing specific examples of precedents established in the early republic that impact American lives today; and
(e) critiquing citizens' responses to changing political and social policies during the early19th century.
(4) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of roles and responsibilities of a civic life by investigating the causes and effects of diverse ideologies on politics, society, and culture that are associated with immigration and migration.
B. Economics and personal financial literacy.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of economic decision-making by:
(a) identifying and analyzing the economic specializations of the 13 colonies; and
(b) identifying and explaining the economic differences between the north and the south.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of incentives and choices by analyzing the benefits and challenges associated with rapidly growing urban areas because of industrialization.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of economic systems and models by illustrating significant European economic theories and their connection to the colonization of the western hemisphere.
(4) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of money and markets by:
(a) summarizing a significant economic warfare initiative of the civil war through creative expression; and
(b) explaining how union army strategies and other socio-economic changes at the end of the civil war led to an economic depression in the southeast United States.
(5) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of personal financial literacy by:
(a) determining the relationship between long-term goals and opportunity cost;
(b) identifying ways insurance may minimize personal financial risk; and
(c) illustrating the power of compounding to highlight the importance of investing at a young age.
C. Geography.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of geographic representations and reasoning by:
(a) using the five themes of geography (i.e. location, place, movement, human-environmental interaction, and region) to describe a specific sovereign tribal nation or indigenous people group of North America;
(b) analyzing how historic events are shaped by geography; and
(c) synthesizing geographic information about the significance of the 13 colonies to the British empire.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of location, place, and region by defining a region by its human and physical characteristics.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of movement, population, and systems by:
(a) describing the causes and effects of exploration and expansion into the Americas, by the Europeans during the15th and 16th centuries;
(b) comparing and contrasting reasons why people moved to and left the 13 colonies; and
(c) identifying immigration and emigration factors that motivated groups to move to and within the United States during time periods of mass immigration.
(4) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of human-environmental interactions and sustainability by:
(a) describing how indigenous people of North America adapted to their environment;
(b) critiquing the ideas and belief systems related to land and resource-use among indigenous people and Europeans; and
(c) describing a human-created environmental concern related to western expansion, including different contemporary perspectives and other historical context between 1815 CE and 1850 CE.
D. History.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of historical change, continuity, context, and reconciliation by:
(a) identifying key people, places, and ideas from major European nations of the 15th and16th centuries;
(b) identifying and describing the structure and function of the three branches of government, as laid out in the United States constitution;
(c) comparing and contrasting indigenous and Hispanic peoples' assimilation experiences with later immigrants' experiences as part of expansion across the territorial United States;
(d) analyzing the development of the women's suffrage movement over time and its legacy; and
(e) making personal connections to immigration stories and experiences in the past and present.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of causes and consequences by:
(a) evaluating the impacts of European colonization on indigenous populations;
(b) describing the impact of slavery on African populations in Africa and the Americas;
(c) identifying indigenous alliances during and after the American revolutionary war;
(d) comparing and contrasting the efforts of the American and British governments to gain the services of African Americans with recruitment of indigenous people;
(e) describing the causes and effects of the Mexican American war and its consequences on residents living in the "new" United States territories;
(f) examining the ways the United States acquired new territories, including purchases, forced relocation, treaties, annexation, and war;
(g) demonstrating how conflicts over slavery led the north and the south to war; and
(h) evaluating the impact of science and technology during the civil war period.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of historical thinking by:
(a) comparing and contrasting the causes, demographics, and results of the American revolution;
(b) discussing the role of religion in the 13 colonies and its impact on developing American identity;
(c) comparing and contrasting the causes, demographics, and results of the American revolution with the French and Latin American revolutions; and
(d) comparing and contrasting the causes, demographics, and results of the Haitian revolution and enslaved peoples' rebellions between 1830 CE and 1860 CE.
(4) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of critical consciousness and perspective by:
(a) demonstrating why different people may have different perspectives of the same historical event and why multiple interpretations should be considered to avoid historical linearity and inevitability; and
(b) examining both sides in debate or academic discussion of politics in response to immigration.
(5) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of power dynamics, leadership, and agency by:
(a) describing how white supremacist organizations in the United States arose with the intention of maintaining the oppression of specific groups through informal institutions;
(b) describing demographic shifts because of the civil war and reconstruction; and
(c) analyzing why and how indigenous people resisted United States territorial expansion.
E. Ethnic, cultural, and identity studies.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of diversity and identity by:
(a) describing how knowledge and perspectives of indigenous people can help inform solutions to environmental and human rights issues;
(b) drawing a diagram or making a model to illustrate how indigenous people have preserved their histories;
(c) examining how enslaved people adapted within and resisted their captivity;
(d) describing the formation of African American cultures and identities in free and enslaved communities; and
(e) identifying and exploring how current traditions, rites, and norms or identity groups have changed or are changing over time.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of identity in history by:
(a) comparing and contrasting the various origins - indigenous, forced, voluntary - of identity groups in the United States;
(b) examining the impact of historical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social factors, which resulted in unequal power relations among identity groups;
(c) examining historical and contemporary cultural, economic, intellectual, political, and social contributions to society by individuals or groups within an identity group between c. 1400 CE and 1500 CE;
(d) examining historical and contemporary cultural, economic, intellectual, political, and social contributions to society by individuals or groups within an identity group between 1490 CE and 1750 CE;
(e) examining the demographics of the 13 colonies in the years leading to, and during, the American revolution;
(f) describing the influence of diverse ideologies on politics, society, and culture in early United States history;
(g) analyzing the motivations of various groups and their impacts of western expansion and the settlement of the United States;
(h) examining the role assimilation plays in the loss of cultural, ethnic, racial, and religious identities and language;
(i) deconstructing the emancipation proclamation to determine its contemporary purpose and current significance;
(j) discussing the impact of the western campaign on indigenous people;
(k) exploring and demonstrating the contemporary and current significance of Juneteenth; and
(l) assessing how social policies and economic forces offer privilege or systemic inequity in accessing social, political, and economic opportunity for identity groups in education, government, healthcare, industry, and law enforcement.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of community equity building by:
(a) discussing how the exchanges of resources and culture across civilizations led to the emergence of a global society;
(b) identifying and analyzing cultural, differently abled, ethnic, gender, national, political, racial, and religious identities and related perceptions and behaviors by society of these identities;
(c) discussing the similarities, differences, and interactions between civil rights and civil liberties;
(d) evaluating the role of racial social constructs in the structures and functions of a 21st century American society;
(e) applying knowledge of an event of the sectionalism and reform era to analyze current issues and events; and
(f) investigating how identity groups and society address systemic inequity through individual actions, individual champions, social movements, and local, community, national, and global advocacy.
F. Inquiry.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of constructing compelling and supporting questions by:
(a) developing compelling questions about a relevant topic of interest; and
(b) creating supporting questions from credible sources to expand upon the compelling question.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of gathering and evaluating sources by:
(a) identifying, locating, and gathering reliable and relevant primary and secondary sources from a variety of media, such as print, digital, multimedia, artifacts, and oral traditions;
(b) evaluating primary and secondary sources for the author's bias, perspective of the creator, and relevance to the topic;
(c) describing how geographic representations can express both geo-spatial locations and human bias; and
(d) using a coherent system or structure to evaluate the credibility of a source by determining its relevance and intended use.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of developing claims by:
(a) categorizing and sequencing significant people, places, events, and ideas in history using both chronological and conceptual graphic organizers;
(b) formulating a claim based on evidence from primary and secondary sources in response to a question;
(c) citing specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources;
(d) using primary and secondary sources to analyze conflicting and diverse points of views on a certain topic;
(e) making connections between current events, historical materials, and personal experience; and
(f) examining how and why diverse groups have been denied equality and opportunity, both institutionally and informally.
(4) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of communicating and critiquing conclusions by:
(a) engaging in discussion, debate, or academic conversation analyzing multiple viewpoints on public issues;
(b) creating maps, charts, infographics, or other visual media that communicate research findings or other significant information digitally or on paper;
(c) developing informational texts, including analyses of historical and current events;
(d) portraying historical people, places, events, and ideologies of the time to examine history from the perspective of the participants through creative expression;
(e) using applicable presentation technology to communicate research findings or other significant information; and
(f) conducting a research project to answer a self-generated question of historical significance, and applying problem-solving skills for historical research.
(5) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of taking informed action by:
(a) recognizing and valuing the student's group identities without perceiving or treating others as inferior;
(b) identifying facets of personal identity, determining how the student wants to present themselves to the world as a person belonging to an identity group, and brainstorming how to address negative perceptions.
(c) describing ways in which stereotyping can be a barrier to acting as an ally and engaging in positive civic behaviors in classrooms, schools, and the broader community;
(d) explaining the challenges and opportunities people face when taking action to address problems, including predicting possible results; and
(e) synthesizing historical and local knowledge to take age-appropriate action toward mending, healing, and transforming the future.

Notes

N.M. Code R. § 6.29.11.16
Adopted by New Mexico Register, Volume XXXIII, Issue 04, February 22, 2022, eff. 2/22/2022

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