N.M. Code R. § 6.29.11.21 - ANCHOR STANDARDS AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR HIGH SCHOOL UNITED STATES HISTORY

A. Geography.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of movement, population, and systems by:
(a) analyzing and predicting how locations, places, and regions impact the evolution of human perspective and identity;
(b) predicting future social, political, economic, cultural, religious, spiritual, and environmental opportunities, and obstacles associated with movement, population, decision-making, and perspectives in a given place or region between 1945 and 1975;
(c) describing how particular historical events and developments shape human processes and systems in World War II;
(d) predicting future social, political, economic, cultural, religious, spiritual, and environmental opportunities, and obstacles associated with movement, population, decision-making, and perspectives in World War II; and
(e) describing how particular historical events and developments shape human processes and systems in a given place or region over time, between 1945 and 1975.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of human-environmental interactions and sustainability by:
(a) assessing how social, economic, politic, and environmental developments at global, national, regional, and local levels affect the sustainability of modern and traditional cultures between 1865 and 1877;
(b) describing how particular historical events and developments shape human processes and systems in a given place or region over time, between 1890 and 1920;
(c) analyzing how the forces of cooperation and conflict within and among people, nations, and empires influence the division and control of the Earth's surface and resources between 1920 and 1929;
(d) analyzing how the forces of cooperation and conflict within and among people, nations, and empires influence the division and control of the Earth's surface and resources between 1929 and 1941;
(e) analyzing how the forces of cooperation and conflict within and among people, nations, and empires influence the division and control of the Earth's surface and resources between 1945 and 1975; and
(f) assessing how social, economic, political, and environmental developments at global, national, regional, and local levels affect the sustainability of modern and traditional cultures between 2008 and the present.
B. High school United States history.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of historical change, continuity, context, and reconciliation by:
(a) evaluating the long-term consequences of the end of reconstruction and the rise of Jim Crow on formerly enslaved people and their descendants in all regions of the country;
(b) examining immigration policy in the United States;
(c) evaluating what an efficient, equitable, equal, and just economic system would look like in the United States;
(d) examining labor struggles and populist movements in the United States and comparing to other movements around the world;
(e) examining United States imperialist policies and practices;
(f) analyzing the influence of cultural, literary, and artistic movements between 1890 and 1920;
(g) examining the ethics of the suppression of civil liberties and human rights during times of conflict and war, past and present;
(h) analyzing the role of the United States in the world and the balance of foreign and domestic priorities;
(i) analyzing the influence of cultural, literacy, and artistic movements during the progressive era and World War I;
(j) exploring the change between traditionalism and modernity in American society in the past and compare it with today;
(k) evaluating new deal programs and their impact on diverse groups of people in Americas;
(l) analyzing the influence of cultural, literary, and artistic movements between 1929 and 1941;
(m) analyzing the similarities, differences, and connections between the racial social order in the United States, Germany, and other countries during World War II;
(n) analyzing the influence of cultural, literary, and artistic movements during World War II;
(o) exploring the legacy of "othering" in the United States, including boarding schools, internment camps, and detention centers;
(p) examining the short- and long-term effects of central intelligence agency involvement in Latin America;
(q) analyzing the impact of cold war rhetoric and ideology on social movements and activists in the United States;
(r) examining how evolving global and domestic understanding of, and respect for, universal human rights affected in the development of the civil rights movement in the United States;
(s) analyzing issues related to race relations in the United States since the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965;
(t) evaluating the role of McCarthyism on the civil rights movement;
(u) evaluating the influence of 1960s cultural and artistic movements from past to present day;
(v) assessing the short- and long-term social and political impacts of conservatism and liberalism in the United States;
(w) examining the short- and long-term impacts of criminal justice policy implemented during the presidencies of Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton;
(x) examining the push-pull relationship between conservatism and liberalism in America over time;
(y) evaluating whether the cold war definitively ended in 1991;
(z) analyzing the influence of cultural, literary, and artistic movements between 2008 and the present; and
(aa) analyzing major trends, issues, and advances to address healthcare disparities in the past, present, and future.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of causes and consequences by:
(a) analyzing the short- and long-term effects of the end of the civil war and reconstruction period;
(b) examining the impact of the end of the civil war on the settlement of the west, and on the relationships between the United States and the indigenous nations of the west;
(c) explaining the various causes of the industrial revolution;
(d) evaluating the consequences of the industrial revolution;
(e) analyzing social, political, and economic reasons groups migrated to and within the United States, including push and pull factors;
(f) analyzing the causes and course of the growing role of the United States in world affairs from the civil war to World War I;
(g) distinguishing between the long-term causes and triggering events that led the United States into World War I;
(h) explaining the course and significance of Woodrow Wilson's wartime diplomacy, including his fourteen points, the league of nations, and the failure of the treaty of Versailles;
(i) assessing how new technology in transportation, communication, and finance impacted American society;
(j) describing the multiple causes and consequences of the global and the United States depression of the 1930s;
(k) assessing the impact and legacy of new deal relief, recovery, and reform programs;
(l) explaining the reasons for American involvement in World War II and the key actions and events leading up to declarations of war against Japan and Germany;
(m) explaining the rise of fascism and the forms it took in Germany and Italy, including ideas and policies that led to the Holocaust, also known as Shoah;
(n) analyzing the events that led to World War II, the major battles of the war, use of nuclear weapons, and the Holocaust, also known as Shoah;
(o) analyzing the consequences of World War II, including the conferences of allied leaders following the war, and the development of human rights;
(p) assessing the social, political, and economic transformation of the United States during World War II.;
(q) analyzing the causes, conflicts, and consequences of the cold war;
(r) evaluating the policy of containment as a response by the United States to Soviet expansionist policies;
(s) analyzing how United States foreign policy during the cold war shaped conflicts in Asia and the Americas;
(t) analyzing the roots of domestic communism and anti-communism in the 1950s, the origins and consequences of, and the resistance to McCarthyism;
(u) analyzing the origin, goals, and outcomes of civil rights groups in the 1950s and the 1960s, and their influence on contemporary civil rights movements;
(v) evaluating resistance to integration in white communities, protests to end segregation, and the supreme court decisions on civil rights;
(w) analyzing the social, political, and economic conditions of the 1960s and 1970s that led to a rise in conservatism and its overall impact on society; and
(x) analyzing how communist economic policies and United States-sponsored resistance to Soviet military and diplomatic initiatives contributed to the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989 and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of critical consciousness and perspectives by:
(a) evaluating how the events of reconstruction impacted people from diverse groups;
(b) exploring African American economic, political, and sociocultural (educational, artistic, literary) responses to emancipation and reconstruction;
(c) identifying the ways in which gender roles were changing and unchanged during the 19th century;
(d) evaluating the effects of the entry of women into the workforce after the civil war and analyzing women's political organizations;
(e) analyzing the consequences of the continuing westward expansion of the American people after the civil war;
(f) evaluating the impact of the 14th Amendment on indigenous people and Asian and European immigrant men and women;
(g) examining the ways that the great migration changed America, and exploring the ways that African Americans adapted and resisted;
(h) evaluating how events during imperialism impacted people from diverse groups;
(i) examining the ways in which art, journalism, literature, and cultural artifacts served as forms of resistance and contributed to the anti-imperialist movement;
(j) evaluating major reform movements and reformers during the progressive era;
(k) evaluating the inclusivity and exclusivity of progressive era reform movements;
(l) analyzing the campaign for, and the opposition to, women's suffrage in the late 19th and early 20th centuries;
(m) analyzing the strategies of African Americans to achieve basic civil rights in the early 20th century;
(n) analyzing how ideologies of the progressive movement impacted indigenous people in the United States;
(o) evaluating how the events of the 1920s impacted people from diverse groups;
(p) exploring the arts, entrepreneurship, and philanthropy of the Harlem renaissance and its connections to the great migration;
(q) evaluating the passage of the 19th amendment from the perspective of diverse groups in American society;
(r) examining the ways in which gender role norms changed and stayed the same in 1920s America;
(s) examining the lives and experiences of Latinos and other diverse groups and the relationship of the United States to Mexico;
(t) evaluating how the events of this time period, during World War II, impacted people from diverse groups;
(u) examining the ways in which gender roles changed and stayed the same for women during World War II;
(v) evaluating how the events during the cold war impacted people from diverse groups;
(w) examining the ways in which gender roles changed and stayed the same during World War II;
(x) evaluating how the events of the civil rights movement impacted people from diverse groups;
(y) analyzing the causes, course, and impact on American politics and society of new social and political movements, including consideration of the role of protest, advocacy organizations, and active citizen participation;
(z) evaluating how major world events between 1968 and 2008, such as 9/11, and the rise of global terrorism impacted people from diverse groups;
(aa) examining the ways in which gender roles changed and stayed the same between 1945 and 1975;
(bb) evaluating the significance of the federal 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act;
(cc) examining the experiences, activism, and legislation impacting the LGBTQIA+ community;
(dd) evaluating how the events between 2008 and the present impact people from diverse groups; and
(ee) examining the ways in which gender roles changed and stayed the same between 1968 and 2008.
(4) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of power dynamics, leadership, and agency by:
(a) exploring the efforts of the federal government, African Americans, and civil society reformers to create a new political and social order after emancipation;
(b) explaining what progressivism meant in the early 20th century through the ideas, actions, and experiences of progressive leaders;
(c) analyzing the governmental policies of the progressive period, determine which problems they were designed to solve, and assessing long- and short-term effectiveness;
(d) analyzing the role of the United States in World War I;
(e) examining the conflict between traditionalism and modernity as manifested in the major political and economic events in the first two decades of the 20th century;
(f) summarizing United States diplomatic and military policies during the cold war;
(g) analyzing the important policies and events that took place during the presidencies of John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and Richard Nixon;
(h) analyzing the rise of conservatism and liberalism in American politics and society;
(i) evaluating the role of the United States in contemporary global issues;
(j) evaluating the impacts of contemporary global issues on the United States;
(k) analyzing the current state and health of American democracy;
(l) analyzing some of the major technological and social trends and issues of the late 20th and early 21st centuries;
(m) evaluating the effectiveness of the federal government's response to international and domestic terrorism in the 21st century;
(n) examining contemporary civil and human rights struggles and successes; and
(o) analyzing United States government policies to reduce climate disruption.
C. Ethnic, cultural, and identity studies.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of diversity and identity by:
(a) investigating how identity groups and society address systemic inequity through individual actions, individual champions, social movements, and local community, national, and global advocacy;
(b) identifying and exploring how current traditions, rites, and norms of identity groups have or are changing over time;
(c) comparing and contrasting the various origins - indigenous, forced, voluntary - of identity groups in the United States;
(d) examining the role assimilation plays in the loss of cultural, ethnic, racial, and religious identities and language, between 1865 and 1920;
(e) examining the impact of historical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social factors, which resulted in unequal power relations among identity groups, between 1890 and 1920;
(f) examining the impact of historical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social factors, which resulted in unequal power relations among identity groups, during the progressive era and World War I;
(g) examining the role assimilation plays in the loss of cultural, ethnic, racial, and religious identities and language, during the progressive era and World War I;
(h) examining the impact of historical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social factors, which resulted in unequal power relations among identity groups, between 1920 and 1929;
(i) examining the impact of historical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social factors, which resulted in unequal power relations among identity groups, between 1929 and 1941; and
(j) assessing how social policies and economic forces offer privilege or systemic inequity in accessing social, political, and economic opportunity for identity groups in education, government, healthcare, industry, and law enforcement.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of community identity in history by examining the impact of historical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social factors that resulted in unequal power relations among identity groups.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of community equity building by:
(a) examining historical and contemporary cultural, economic, political, and social contributions to society by individuals or groups within an identity group;
(b) examining the impact of historical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social factors, which resulted in unequal power relations among identity groups, during World War II;
(c) investigating how identity groups and society address systemic identity through individual actions, individual champions, social movements, and local community, national, and global advocacy;
(d) examining historical and contemporary cultural, economic, intellectual, political, and social contribution to society by individuals or groups within an identity group;
(e) investigating how identity groups and society address systemic inequity through individual actions, individual champions, social movements, and local community, national, and global advocacy; and
(f) evaluating the role of racial social construct in the structure and function of a 21st century American society;
D. Inquiry.
(1) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of constructing compelling and supporting questions by:
(a) creating compelling questions representing key ideas within the disciplines; and
(b) developing supporting questions that contribute to an inquiry and demonstrate how, through engaging source work, new compelling and supporting questions emerge.
(2) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of gathering and evaluating sources by:
(a) gathering relevant information from multiple sources representing a wide range of views while using the origin, authority, structure, context, and corroborative value of the sources to guide the selection; and
(b) evaluating the credibility of a source by examining how experts value the source.
(3) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of developing claims by:
(a) identifying evidence that draws information directly and substantively from multiple sources to detect inconsistencies in evidence to revise or strengthen claims; and
(b) refining claims and counterclaims attending to precision, significance, and knowledge conveyed through the claim while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both.
(4) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of communicating and critiquing conclusions by:
(a) constructing arguments using precise and knowledgeable claims, with evidence from multiple sources, while acknowledging counterclaims and evidentiary weaknesses;
(b) constructing explanations using reasoning, correct sequence, examples, and details with significant and pertinent information and data, while acknowledging the strengths and weaknesses of the explanations given its purpose;
(c) presenting adaptations of arguments and explanations that feature evocative ideas and perspectives on issues and topics to reach a range of audiences and venues outside the classroom using print, oral, and digital technologies; and
(d) critiquing the use of claims and evidence in arguments for credibility.
(5) The student shall demonstrate an understanding of taking informed action by:
(a) using disciplinary and interdisciplinary lenses to understand the characteristics and causes of local, regional, and global problems; instances of such problems in multiple contexts; and challenges and opportunities faced by those trying to address these problems over time and place; and
(b) applying a range of deliberative and democratic strategies and procedures to make decisions and take action in their classrooms, schools, and out-of-school contexts.

Notes

N.M. Code R. § 6.29.11.21
Adopted by New Mexico Register, Volume XXXIII, Issue 04, February 22, 2022, eff. 2/22/2022

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