Or. Admin. R. 410-170-0090 - BRS Types of Care

(1) Shelter, Community Step-Down, and Independent Living Program:
(a) The BRS contractor or BRS provider may use either a residential care model or proctor care model for these BRS types of care;
(b) The BRS contractor providing one of these BRS types of care shall, and require that its BRS provider, ensure that a minimum of six hours of services are available per week to each BRS client as follows:
(A) One hour of individual counseling or individual skills-training provided by social service staff; and
(B) Five hours of any combination of individual or group counseling, crisis counseling, skills-training, or parent training.
(c) The BRS client is placed in a shelter type of care as a short-term intervention to develop necessary skills;
(d) The BRS client is placed in a community step-down type of care from a higher BRS level of care following a thorough Assessment and Evaluation Report and when the BRS client requires only six BRS hours of service but the same level of BRS structure and support;
(e) The BRS client placed in an independent living program type of care requires a structured, supervised setting prior to transitioning to a supported community placement or living independently.
(2) Enhanced Structure Independent Living Program:
(a) This BRS type of care follows a residential care model;
(b) The BRS contractor providing this BRS type of care shall, and require that its BRS provider, ensure that a minimum of six hours of services are available per week to each BRS client as follows:
(A) One hour of individual counseling or individual skills-training provided by social service staff; and
(B) Five hours of any combination of individual or group counseling, crisis counseling, skills-training, or parent training.
(c) The BRS client placed in an enhanced structure independent living program type of care requires a structured, supervised setting with increased staff supervision and support prior to transitioning to a supported community placement or living independently.
(d) The BRS client placed in an independent living program type of care requires a structured, supervised setting prior to transitioning to a supported community placement or independent living.
(3) Proctor Care, Proctor Enhanced Services, Assessment and Evaluation Proctor:
(a) These BRS types of care follow a proctor care model;
(b) The BRS contractor providing one of these BRS types of care shall, and require that its BRS provider, ensure that a minimum of 11 hours of services are available per week to each BRS client as follows:
(A) Two hours of individual counseling or individual skills-training, one of which is provided by social service staff; and
(B) Nine hours of any combination of individual or group counseling, crisis counseling, skills-training, or parent training.
(c) The BRS client placed in proctor care types of care requires structure, behavior management, and support services to develop the skills necessary to be successful in a less restrictive home setting with an approved proctor foster parent;
(d) The BRS client placed in proctor enhanced services types of care requires enhanced structure during the daytime hours. This level of care provides the structure of day treatment for necessary skill development with a less restrictive home setting with an approved proctor foster parent;
(e) The BRS client is placed in assessment and evaluation proctor type of care to identify deficiencies and develop necessary skills.
(4) Basic Residential, Rehabilitation Services, Intensive Residential, Intensive Rehabilitation Services, Assessment and Evaluation Residential, Short-Term Stabilization:
(a) These types of care follow a residential care model. The BRS contractor shall, and require that its BRS provider, provide 24-hour supervision of the BRS client by ensuring that at least one direct care staff is on duty and awake whenever a BRS client is present in its program;
(b) The BRS contractor providing these BRS types of care shall, and require that its BRS provider, ensure that a minimum of 11 hours of services are available per week to each BRS client as follows:
(A) Two hours of either individual counseling or individual skills-training, one of which is provided by social service staff; and
(B) Nine hours of any combination of individual or group counseling, crisis counseling, skills-training, or parent training.
(c) The BRS client placed in basic residential BRS types of care requires the structure, behavior management, and support services of a residential care model for necessary skill development;
(d) The BRS client placed in rehabilitation services types of care requires the structure, behavior management, and support services of a residential care model for necessary skill development;
(e) The BRS client is placed in assessment and evaluation residential BRS type of care to identify deficiencies and develop necessary skills;
(f) The BRS client placed in intensive residential or intensive rehabilitation services BRS types of care requires more intensive structure, behavior management, and support services than a BRS client in the basic residential or rehabilitation BRS types of care;
(g) The BRS client placed in short-term stabilization BRS type of care requires short-term intervention to provide behavioral stabilization.
(5) Intensive Behavioral Support:
(a) This type of care follows a residential care model. The BRS contractor shall, and require that its BRS provider, provide 24-hour supervision of the BRS client by ensuring that at least one direct care staff is on duty and awake whenever a BRS client is present in its program;
(b) The BRS contractor providing this level of care shall, and require that its BRS provider, ensure that a minimum of 11 hours of services are available per week to each BRS client as follows:
(A) Three hours of individual counseling or individual skills-training, two hours of which are provided by social service staff; and
(B) Eight hours of any combination of individual or group counseling, crisis counseling, skills-training, or parent training.
(c) BRS clients placed in the intensive behavioral support type of care have difficulty re-regulating their emotions due to the presence of complex developmental trauma or other mental health concerns. They require skill training and intensive behavioral support.

Notes

Or. Admin. R. 410-170-0090
DMAP 63-2013, f. 11-14-13, cert. ef. 1-1-14; DMAP 118-2018, amend filed 12/26/2018, effective 1/1/2019; DMAP 30-2020, temporary amend filed 06/26/2020, effective 7/1/2020 through 12/27/2020; DMAP 60-2020, amend filed 12/10/2020, effective 12/27/2020

Statutory/Other Authority: ORS 413.042 & 414.065

Statutes/Other Implemented: ORS 414.065

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