civil procedure

a fortiori

A Latin term meaning literally 'from [the] stronger'. Translated into English and used in the particular context of legal writing, the term often means 'from [the] stronger [argument]'. If a particular fact is true, then one can infer that a second...

a priori

Definition

A Latin term meaning "from what comes before." In legal arguments, a priori generally means that a particular idea is taken as a given.

a priori assumption

An a priori assumption is an assumption that is presumed to be true without any assessment of the facts or without further proof. A priori is a Latin term that refers to a theoretical deduction made on a subject without a precise and detailed...

ab initio

Definition

A Latin term meaning "from the beginning." Used to indicate that some fact existed from the start of a relevant time period.

abate

Abate is to eliminate or nullify.

The term is often used in relation to the elimination of a nuisance. For example, California Civil Code § 3491 provides that one of the “remedies against a public nuisance [is] abatement.”...

abatement

See abate.

[Last updated in November of 2021 by the Wex Definitions Team]

abscond

Abscond means leaving a jurisdiction secretly or suddenly, e.g. to avoid service of process, arrest, or prosecution; or leaving with another person's money or property. Absconding is generally a criminal offense which may lead to imprisonment...

absolute disparity

Definition

A calculation used to analyze a claim that a jury pool did not represent a fair cross-section of the community. Calculated by subtracting the percentage of a group in the jury pool from the percentage of that group in the general population...

absolute privilege

Definition

Absolute privilege, in defamation law, refers to the fact that in certain circumstances, an individual is immune from liability for defamatory statements..

Overview

Absolute privilege applies to statements made in certain contexts...

abstention

The abstention doctrine is an authority that precludes federal courts from hearing cases within its jurisdictions, instead, giving state courts authority over the case. The policy behind this doctrine is rooted in federalism, and the interest...

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