constitutional law

house arrest

House arrest is a form of detention in which a person is confined to their residence for a specified period of time, typically as a result of a criminal conviction. The use of house arrest is governed by various state and federal laws,...

human rights

Human rights refer to fundamental rights to which all human beings are equally entitled. Unlike rights bestowed by governments, human rights are both inalienable and universal, and exist regardless of whether a state chooses to recognize them...

Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell (1988)

Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, 485 U.S. 46, is a U.S. Supreme Court case which ruled that First Amendment free speech protections require public figures to show that a publication contained a false statement of fact made with actual...

Immigration & Naturalization Service v. Delgado

466 U.S. 210 (1984)

The Supreme Court held that three factory surveys conducted by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) did not constitute a seizure of the entire work force under the Fourth Amendment. The Supreme Court also held that the...

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is a federal law enforcement agency under the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). In 2003, the Homeland Security Act separated ICE from the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)....

immunity

Immunity refers to legal protection that exempts a person from liability, punishment, or legal action that would otherwise apply. Immunity can be granted in various contexts, including criminal and civil cases, administrative proceedings, and...

impeachment

What is Impeachment?

Technically, impeachment is the Senate's quasi-criminal proceeding instituted to remove a public officer, not the actual act of removal. Most references to impeachment, however, encompass the entire process, beginning with the...

impeachment of a witness

Impeachment of a witness refers to the process of discrediting or undermining the credibility of a witness during a trial, by presenting evidence or asking questions that contradict their testimony or reveal a bias, inconsistency, or...

In re Gault (1967)

In re Gault, 387 U.S. 1 (1967), is a U.S. Supreme Court case in which the Court ruled that juvenile criminal defendants are entitled to Due Process protection under the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The Court opined that due...

inalienable

Inalienable means something that is not transferable or that is impossible to take away. Every constitution provides for fundamental rights which are inalienable rights. For example, the California Constitution's Inalienable Rights Clause...

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