employee benefits

severance pay

Money paid to an employee who is laid off, fired or leaves by mutual agreement. Employers are not generally required to offer severance pay, although a few states require some severance pay for employees who lose their job in a plant closing or large layoff. Employers may also be obligated to provide severance pay if they promised to do so in an employment contract or employee handbook.

per diem

(per dee-um) Latin for "per day," per diem refers to payment of a set amount for each day's expenses for an employee or agent. Typically, a per diem is available only for travel away from home. For example, someone who goes on an overnight business trip for an employer might receive a per diem of $50 to cover meals and incidentals on the trip.

Older Workers Benefit Protection Act (OWBPA)

An amendment to the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the OWBPA is a federal law that requires employers to offer older workers (those who are at least 40 years old) benefits that are equal to or, in some cases, cost the employer as much as, the benefits it offers to younger workers. The OWBPA also sets minimum standards for an employee waiver of the right to sue for age discrimination, designed to ensure that the waiver is knowing and voluntary.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - employee benefits