environmental law

Clean Air Act (CAA)

The Clean Air Act (CAA) U.S.C. Title 42, Chapter 85

A part of Environmental Law, the CAA is a massive piece of legislation from the 1970s, that promulgates uniform national standards for a wide range of air pollutants and sources, through a handful of systems.  The CAA uses a two prong attack - in addition to regulating the air quality levels, it also allows regulate sources of pollution. 
 

 See EPA Website:  http://www.epa.gov/air/caa/

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA)

Overview

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act is better known as CERCLA. It is codified in 42 U.S.C. Chapter 103.

American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009

Also called the Waxman-Markey Bill, this legislation sought to address climate change while building a clean energy economy. Among other things, this bill established a national cap-and-trade system for greenhouse gases and promoted renewable sources of energy.

Carbon Offset

1) The idea that companies or individuals can neutralize the effect of their pollution by investing in pollution reduction efforts in other parts of the world. 2) A financial instrument whose purchase is aimed at the reduction of greenhouse gases. One carbon offset generally pays for the reduction of one metric ton of carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gases.    

SLAPP suit

Definition

Stands for Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation. Lawsuit filed strategically by a corporation against a group or activist opposing certain action taken by the corporation, usually in the realm of an environmental protest. Typical claims underlying a SLAPP suit are libel, slander or restraint of business. Many states have adopted anti-SLAPP statutes in the interest of protecting free speech that provide for speedy hearings of the claims and the possibility of the defendant recovering legal fees and punitive damages.

 

Environmental Impact Report (EIR)

A detailed, written analysis of all the effects that a land development or construction project would have on the local environment, such as on the air quality, noise levels, population, traffic patterns, fire danger, endangered species, archeological artifacts, and community beauty. Many states require submission of such reports to local governments, with a process for public comment, before a development or project can be approved.

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