government

Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA)

A uniform law, adopted by many states, that allows an adult to give money or securities to a child but have the assets managed by someone of the donor's choosing, called a custodian. The gift is made during the donor's lifetime, not at death. The custodianship ends, and the property goes to the beneficiary outright, at an age set by state law, usually 18 or 21. Compare: Uniform Transfers to Minors Act

Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

A uniform law adopted by every state that governs organ and body donations. It covers such matters as how anatomical gifts can be made and offers a suggested form for making donations. It also provides a list of relatives who can authorize organ donation in the absence of donation arrangements made before death. States are free to adopt the act as written or to modify it through the state's legislative process.

trust fund recovery penalty (TFRP)

A penalty from the IRS for not paying "trust fund" taxes, which are taxes a company withholds from an employees paycheck, including Social Security and Medicare taxes and federal income (withholding) taxes. This penalty can be assessed against any owner, officer, or company employee whose job is related to accounts payable, payroll, or the financial operations of the business.

surveillance

The act of observing persons or groups either with notice or their knowledge (overt surveillance) or without their knowledge (covert surveillance). Intrusive surveillance by private citizens may give rise to claims of invasion of privacy. Police officers, as long as they are in a place they have a right to be, can use virtually any type of surveillance device to observe property. Police cannot use specialized heat-scanning surveillance devices to obtain evidence of criminal activity inside a home. Law enforcement officials acquired additional surveillance capability following enactment of The Patriot Act.

sunset law

A law that automatically terminates the agency or program it establishes unless the legislature expressly renews it. For example, a state law creating and funding a new drug rehabilitation program within state prisons may provide that the program will shut down in two years unless it is reviewed and approved by the state legislature.

status

Under immigration law, the name of the visa category a person has been assigned and the group of privileges received upon becoming either a permanent resident or a nonimmigrant (temporary visa holder). For example, a green card shows that the holder has the status of a permanent resident and the privilege of living and working in the United States on a permanent basis. An F-1 or M-1 visa indicates that the holder has the status of a student and the privilege of attending school in the United States until the study program is completed.

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