the Constitution

unreasonable search and seizure

DefinitionAn unreasonable search and seizure is a search and seizure by a law enforcement officer without a search warrant and without probable cause to believe that evidence of a crime is present.OverviewAn unreasonable search and seizure is...

Vance v. Terrazas

444 U.S. 252 (1980)

The Supreme Court held that the U.S. government must prove intent to surrender U.S. citizenship and not just the voluntary commission of a expatriating act and that the appropriate standard of proof for analyzing the citizen’s...

Veto

The power of one person or body to prohibit a course of action chosen by another. In a political context, "veto" usually refers to the power of a chief executive to block or complicate passage of a legislative bill by refusing to sign it into law....

War and defense powers

Under Article I, Section 8, Congress has the power to declare war, raise and support Armies, provide and maintain a Navy, and organize, arm, discipline, and call forth a militia. This power gives Congress quite broad authority to undertake any measures...

War Powers

Article I, Section 8, Clause 11 of the U.S. Constitution grants Congress the power to declare war. The President, meanwhile, derives the power to direct the military after a Congressional declaration of war from Article II, Section 2, which names the...

Washington DC Voting Rights Amendment

Definition from Nolo’s Plain-English Law DictionaryAn attempt to amend the U.S. Constitution to give the citizens of the District of Columbia the same full representation in Congress as any state. Proposed in 1978, the amendment expired in 1985 and was...

Watkins v. United States (1957)

Watkins v. United States (1957) is the U.S. Supreme Court case holding that the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment limits Congress’s ability to conduct investigations, namely its ability to require testimony on inquiries unrelated to...

Woodson v. North Carolina (1976)

Woodson v. North Carolina (1976) is the U.S. Supreme Court case holding that North Carolina’s mandatory death penalty for individuals convicted of first-degree murder violated the Eighth Amendment. Find the full opinion here.

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