white-collar crime

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In June of 2002, Arthur Andersen LLP ("Andersen") was convicted in a jury trial in the U.S. District Court in Houston, Texas, of "corruptly persuading" employees to destroy Enron-related documents in anticipation of an SEC investigation (see indictment...

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Hollinger International, Inc. (“Hollinger”), owner of the Chicago Sun-Times, came under governmental suspicion in 1998 when it began executing non-competition agreements in connection with the sale of most of its smaller newspapers. See United States v...

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The concept of entity liability allows a corporation to be held liable for the criminal misdeeds of its agents if (1) the agent is acting within the actual or apparent scope of their employment or authority and (2) if the agents intend, at...

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Pinkerton liability allows an actor to be held liable for substantive crimes committed by his coconspirators in certain circumstances. A defendant can be held vicariously liable for a substantive offense committed by another member of a conspiracy if...

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Lawrence Eugene Shaw was convicted under 18 U.S.C. § 1344(1) for executing a scheme to obtain funds from a Bank of America (“BoA”) account belonging to Stanley Hsu, a Taiwanese businessman. See United States v. Shaw, 781 F.3d 1130, 1133 (9th Cir. 2015...

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Overview

White-collar crime generally encompasses a variety of nonviolent crimes usually committed in commercial situations for financial gain.

The following is an inclusive list of white-collar offenses : antitrust violations, bankruptcy...

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Wire fraud occurs when interstate wirings are used in furtherance of a criminal act. In order for a defendant to be convicted under 18 U.S.C. 1343 for committing wire fraud, the follow elements must be satisified: (1) the defendant must have been...