14 CFR § 151.13 - Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting landing aid requirements.

§ 151.13 Federal-aid Airport Program: Policy affecting landing aid requirements.

(a) Landing aid requirements. No project for developing or improving an airport may be approved for the Program unless it provides for acquiring or installing such of the following landing aids as the Administrator determines are needed for the safe and efficient use of the airport by aircraft, considering the category of the airport and the type and volume of traffic using it:

(1) Land needed for installing approach lighting systems (ALS).

(2) In-runway lighting.

(3) High intensity runway lighting.

(4) Runway distance markers.

For the purposes of this section “approach lighting system (ALS)” is a standard configuration of aeronautical ground lights in the approach area to a runway or channel to assist a pilot in making an approach to the runway or channel.

(b) Specific landing aid requirements. The landing aids set forth in paragraphs (a) (1) through (4) of this section are required for the safe and efficient use of airports by aircraft in the following cases:

(1) Lands for installing approach lighting systems are required as part of a project if the installing of the components of the system on the airport is in an approved FAA budget, unless the sponsor has already acquired the land necessary for the system or is otherwise undertaking to acquire that land. If the sponsor is otherwise undertaking to acquire the land, the grant agreement for the project must obligate the sponsor to complete the acquisition within a time limit prescribed by the Administrator. The Administrator immediately notifies a sponsor when a budget is approved providing for installing an approach lighting system at the airport concerned.

(2) In-runway lighting is required as part of a project:

(i) If the project includes:

(a) Construction of a new runway designated by the FAA as an instrument landing runway for which the installation of an IFR precision approach system including ALS and ILS, has been programmed by the FAA with funds then available therefor;

(b) An extension of 3,000 feet or more (usable for landing purposes) of the approach end of a designated instrument landing runway equipped, or programed by the FAA, with funds then available therefor, to be equipped, with an IFR precision approach system including ALS and ILS;

(c) Reconstruction of a designated instrument landing runway equipped, or programed by the FAA, with funds then available therefor, to be equipped with an IFR precision approach system including ALS and ILS, if the reconstruction requires the closing of the runway; or

(d) Any other airport development on an airport whose designated instrument landing runway is equipped, or programed by the FAA, with funds then available therefor, to be equipped with an IFR precision approach system including ALS and ILS; and

(ii) Only if a study of the airport shows that in-runway lighting is required for the safe and efficient use of the airport by aircraft, after the Administrator considers the following:

(a) The type and volume of flight activity;

(b) Other existing or planned navigational aids;

(c) Airport environmental factors such as local weather conditions and adjacent geographic profiles;

(d) Approach and departure paths;

(e) Effect on landing and takeoff minima; and

(f) In the case of projects under paragraph (b)(2)(i)(d) of this section, whether installing in-runway lighting requires closing the runway for so long a time that the adverse effect on safety of its closing would outweigh the contribution to safety that would be gained by the in-runway lights or whether it would unduly interfere with the efficiency of aircraft operations.

(3) High intensity runway edge lighting on the designated instrument landing runway is required as a part of a project whenever that runway is equipped or programmed for the installation of an ILS and high intensity runway edge lights are not then installed on the runway or included in another project. A project for extending a runway that has high intensity runway edge lights on the existing runway requires, as a part of the project, the extension of the high intensity runway edge lights.

(4) Runway distance markers whose design standards have been approved and published by the FAA are required as a part of a project on a case-by-case basis if, after reviewing the pertinent facts and circumstances of the case, the Administrator determines that they are needed for the safe and efficient use of the airport by aircraft.

[Doc. No. 1329, 27 FR 12350, Dec. 13, 1962, as amended by Amdt. 151-3, 28 FR 12613, Nov. 27, 1963; Amdt. 151-33, 34 FR 9708, June 21, 1969]