19 CFR § 190.2 - Definitions.

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§ 190.2 Definitions.

For the purposes of this part:

Abstract. Abstract means the summary of the actual production records of the manufacturer.

Act. Act, unless indicated otherwise, means the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended.

Bill of materials. Bill of materials refers to a record that identifies each component incorporated into a manufactured or produced article (and includes components used in the manufacturing or production process). This may include a record kept in the normal course of business.

Designated merchandise. Designated merchandise means either eligible imported duty-paid merchandise or drawback products selected by the drawback claimant as the basis for a drawback claim under 19 U.S.C. 1313(b) or (j)(2), as applicable, or qualified articles selected by the claimant as the basis for drawback under 19 U.S.C. 1313(p).

Destruction. Destruction means the destruction of articles or merchandise to the extent that they have no commercial value. For purposes of 19 U.S.C. 1313(a), (b), (c), and (j), destruction also includes a process by which materials are recovered from imported merchandise or from an article manufactured from imported merchandise, as provided for in 19 U.S.C. 1313(x).

Direct identification drawback. Direct identification drawback includes drawback authorized pursuant to section 313(j)(1) of the Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1313(j)(1)), on imported merchandise exported, or destroyed under CBP supervision, without having been used in the United States (see also sections 313(c), (e), (f), (g), (h), and (q)). Direct identification is involved in manufacturing drawback pursuant to section 313(a) of the Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1313(a)), on imported merchandise used to manufacture or produce an article which is either exported or destroyed. Merchandise or articles may be identified for purposes of direct identification drawback by use of the accounting methods provided for in § 190.14.

Document. In this part, document has its normal meaning and includes information input into and contained within an electronic data field, and electronic versions of hard-copy documents.

Drawback. Drawback, as authorized for payment by CBP, means the refund, in whole or in part, of the duties, taxes, and/or fees paid on imported merchandise, which were imposed under Federal law upon entry or importation, and the refund of internal revenue taxes paid on domestic alcohol as prescribed in 19 U.S.C. 1313(d). More broadly, drawback also includes the refund or remission of other excise taxes pursuant to other provisions of law.

Drawback claim. Drawback claim, as authorized for payment by CBP, means the drawback entry and related documents required by regulation which together constitute the request for drawback payment. All drawback claims must be filed electronically through a CBP-authorized Electronic Data Interchange system. More broadly, drawback claim also includes claims for refund or remission of other excise taxes pursuant to other provisions of law.

Drawback entry. Drawback entry means the document containing a description of, and other required information concerning, the exported or destroyed article upon which a drawback claim is based and the designated imported merchandise for which drawback of the duties, taxes, and fees paid upon importation is claimed. Drawback entries must be filed electronically.

Drawback office. Drawback office means any of the locations where drawback claims and related applications or requests may be submitted. CBP may, in its discretion, transfer or share work between the different drawback offices even though the submission may have been to a particular office.

Drawback product. A drawback product means a finished or partially finished product manufactured in the United States under the procedures in this part for manufacturing drawback. A drawback product may be exported, or destroyed under CBP supervision with a claim for drawback, or it may be used in the further manufacture of other drawback products by manufacturers or producers operating under the procedures in this part for manufacturing drawback, in which case drawback may be claimed upon exportation or destruction of the ultimate product. Products manufactured or produced from substituted merchandise (imported or domestic) also become “drawback products” when applicable substitution requirements of the Act are met. For purposes of section 313(b) of the Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1313(b)), drawback products may be designated as the basis for drawback or deemed to be substituted merchandise (see 19 U.S.C. 1313(b)). For a drawback product to be designated as the basis for a drawback claim, any transfer of the product must be properly documented (see § 190.24).

Exportation. Exportation means the severance of goods from the mass of goods belonging to this country, with the intention of uniting them with the mass of goods belonging to some foreign country. An exportation may be deemed to have occurred when goods subject to drawback are admitted into a foreign trade zone in zone-restricted status, or are laden upon qualifying aircraft or vessels as aircraft or vessel supplies in accordance with section 309(b) of the Act, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1309(b)) (see §§ 10.59 through 10.65 of this chapter).

Exporter. Exporter means that person who, as the principal party in interest in the export transaction, has the power and responsibility for determining and controlling the sending of the items out of the United States. In the case of “deemed exportations” (see definition of exportation in this section), exporter means that person who, as the principal party in interest in the transaction deemed to be an exportation, has the power and responsibility for determining and controlling the transaction. In the case of aircraft or vessel supplies under 19 U.S.C. 1309(b), exporter means the party who has the power and responsibility for lading supplies on the qualifying aircraft or vessel.

Filing. Filing means the electronic delivery to CBP of any document or documentation, as provided for in this part.

Formula. Formula refers to records that identify the quantity of each element, material, chemical, mixture, or other substance incorporated into a manufactured article (and includes those used in the manufacturing or production process). This includes records kept in the normal course of business.

Fungible merchandise or articles. Fungible merchandise or articles means merchandise or articles which for commercial purposes are identical and interchangeable in all situations.

General manufacturing drawback ruling. A general manufacturing drawback ruling means a description of a manufacturing or production operation for drawback and the regulatory requirements and interpretations applicable to that operation (see § 190.7).

Intermediate party. Intermediate party means any party in the chain of commerce leading to the exporter (or destroyer) from the importer and who has acquired, purchased, or possessed the imported or substituted merchandise (or any intermediate or finished article, in the case of manufacturing drawback) as allowed under the applicable regulations for the type of drawback claimed, which authorize the transfer of the imported or other drawback eligible merchandise by that intermediate party to another party.

Manufacture or production. Manufacture or production means a process, including, but not limited to, an assembly, by which merchandise is either made into a new and different article having a distinctive name, character or use; or is made fit for a particular use even though it is not made into a new and different article.

Multiple products. Multiple products mean two or more products produced concurrently by a manufacture or production operation or operations.

Per unit averaging. Per unit averaging means the equal apportionment of the amount of duties, taxes, and fees eligible for drawback for all units covered by a single line item on an entry summary to each unit of merchandise. This method of refund calculation is required for certain substitution drawback claims (see § 190.51(b)(ii)), which may also be subject to additional limitations under the “lesser of” rules, if applicable (see § 190.22(a)(1)(ii) and 190.32(b)).

Possession. Possession, for purposes of substitution unused merchandise drawback (19 U.S.C. 1313(j)(2)), means physical or operational control of the merchandise, including ownership while in bailment, in leased facilities, in transit to, or in any other manner under the operational control of, the party claiming drawback.

Records. Records include, but are not limited to, written or electronic business records, statements, declarations, documents and electronically generated or machine readable data which pertain to a drawback claim or to the information contained in the records required by Chapter 4 of Title 19, United States Code, in connection with the filing of a drawback claim and which may include records normally kept in the ordinary course of business (see 19 U.S.C. 1508).

Relative value. Relative value means, except for purposes of § 190.51(b), the value of a product divided by the total value of all products which are necessarily manufactured or produced concurrently in the same operation. Relative value is based on the market value, or other value approved by CBP, of each such product determined as of the time it is first separated in the manufacturing or production process. Market value is generally measured by the selling price, not including any packaging, transportation, or other identifiable costs, which accrue after the product itself is processed. Drawback must be apportioned to each such product based on its relative value at the time of separation.

Schedule. A schedule means a document filed by a drawback claimant, under section 313(a) or (b), as amended (19 U.S.C. 1313(a) or (b)), showing the quantity of imported or substituted merchandise used in or appearing in each article exported or destroyed that justifies a claim for drawback.

Schedule B. Schedule B means the Department of Commerce Schedule B, Statistical Classification of Domestic and Foreign Commodities Exported from the United States.

Sought chemical element. A sought chemical element, under section 313(b), means an element listed in the Periodic Table of Elements that is imported into the United States or a chemical compound (a distinct substance formed by a chemical union of two or more elements in definite proportion by weight) consisting of those elements, either separately in elemental form or contained in source material.

Specific manufacturing drawback ruling. A specific manufacturing drawback ruling means a letter of approval (or its electronic equivalent) issued by CBP Headquarters in response to an application filed by a manufacturer or producer for a ruling on a specific manufacturing or production operation for drawback, as described in the format in Appendix B of this part. Specific manufacturing drawback rulings are subject to the provisions in part 177 of this chapter.

Substituted merchandise or articles. Substituted merchandise or articles means merchandise or articles that may be substituted as follows:

(1) For manufacturing drawback pursuant to section 1313(b), substituted merchandise must be classifiable under the same 8-digit HTSUS subheading number as the designated imported merchandise;

(2) For rejected merchandise drawback pursuant to section 1313(c)(2), substituted merchandise must be classifiable under the same 8-digit HTSUS subheading number and have the same specific product identifier (such as part number, SKU, or product code) as the designated imported merchandise;

(3) For unused merchandise drawback pursuant to section 1313(j)(2), substituted merchandise must be classifiable under the same 8-digit HTSUS subheading number as the designated imported merchandise except for wine which may also qualify pursuant to § 190.32(d), but when the 8-digit HTSUS subheading number under which the imported merchandise is classified begins with the term “other,” then the other merchandise may be substituted for imported merchandise for drawback purposes if the other merchandise and such imported merchandise are classifiable under the same 10-digit HTSUS statistical reporting number and the article description for that 10-digit HTSUS statistical reporting number does not begin with the term “other”; but when the first 8 digits of the 10-digit Schedule B number applicable to the exported merchandise are the same as the first 8 digits of the HTSUS subheading number under which the imported merchandise is classified, the merchandise may be substituted (without regard to whether the Schedule B number corresponds to more than one 8-digit HTSUS subheading number); and

(4) For substitution drawback of finished petroleum derivatives pursuant to section 1313(p), a substituted article must be of the same kind and quality as the qualified article for which it is substituted, that is, the articles must be commercially interchangeable or described in the same 8-digit HTSUS subheading number (see § 190.172(b)).

Unused merchandise. Unused merchandise means, for purposes of unused merchandise drawback claims, imported merchandise or other merchandise upon which either no operations have been performed or upon which any operation or combination of operations has been performed (including, but not limited to, testing, cleaning, repacking, inspecting, sorting, refurbishing, freezing, blending, repairing, reworking, cutting, slitting, adjusting, replacing components, relabeling, disassembling, and unpacking), but which does not amount to a manufacture or production for drawback purposes under 19 U.S.C. 1313(a) or (b).

Verification. Verification means the examination of any and all records, maintained by the claimant, or any party involved in the drawback process, which are required by the appropriate CBP officer to render a meaningful recommendation concerning the drawback claimant's conformity to the law and regulations and the determination of supportability, correctness, and validity of the specific claim or groups of claims being verified.

Wine. Wine, for purposes of substitution unused merchandise drawback under 19 U.S.C. 1313(j)(2) and pursuant to the alternative standard for substitution (see 19 CFR 190.32(d)), refers to table wine. Consistent with Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) regulations, table wine is a “Class 1 grape wine” that satisfies the requirements of 27 CFR 4.21(a)(1) and having an alcoholic content not in excess of 14 percent by volume pursuant to 27 CFR 4.21(a)(2)).