24 CFR § 576.403 - Shelter and housing standards.

§ 576.403 Shelter and housing standards.

(a) Lead-based paint remediation and disclosure. The Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act (42 U.S.C. 4821-4846), the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 4851-4856), and implementing regulations in 24 CFR part 35, subparts A, B, H, J, K, M, and R apply to all shelters assisted under ESG program and all housing occupied by program participants.

(b) Minimum standards for emergency shelters. Any building for which Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG) funds are used for conversion, major rehabilitation, or other renovation, must meet state or local government safety and sanitation standards, as applicable, and the following minimum safety, sanitation, and privacy standards. Any emergency shelter that receives assistance for shelter operations must also meet the following minimum safety, sanitation, and privacy standards. The recipient may also establish standards that exceed or add to these minimum standards.

(1) Structure and materials. The shelter building must be structurally sound to protect residents from the elements and not pose any threat to health and safety of the residents. Any renovation (including major rehabilitation and conversion) carried out with ESG assistance must use Energy Star and WaterSense products and appliances.

(2) Access. The shelter must be accessible in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (29 U.S.C. 794) and implementing regulations at 24 CFR part 8; the Fair Housing Act (42 U.S.C. 3601 et seq.) and implementing regulations at 24 CFR part 100; and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (42 U.S.C. 12131 et seq.) and 28 CFR part 35; where applicable.

(3) Space and security. Except where the shelter is intended for day use only, the shelter must provide each program participant in the shelter with an acceptable place to sleep and adequate space and security for themselves and their belongings.

(4) Interior air quality. Each room or space within the shelter must have a natural or mechanical means of ventilation. The interior air must be free of pollutants at a level that might threaten or harm the health of residents.

(5) Water supply. The shelter's water supply must be free of contamination.

(6) Sanitary facilities. Each program participant in the shelter must have access to sanitary facilities that are in proper operating condition, are private, and are adequate for personal cleanliness and the disposal of human waste.

(7) Thermal environment. The shelter must have any necessary heating/cooling facilities in proper operating condition.

(8) Illumination and electricity. The shelter must have adequate natural or artificial illumination to permit normal indoor activities and support health and safety. There must be sufficient electrical sources to permit the safe use of electrical appliances in the shelter.

(9) Food preparation. Food preparation areas, if any, must contain suitable space and equipment to store, prepare, and serve food in a safe and sanitary manner.

(10) Sanitary conditions. The shelter must be maintained in a sanitary condition.

(11) Fire safety. There must be at least one working smoke detector in each occupied unit of the shelter. Where possible, smoke detectors must be located near sleeping areas. The fire alarm system must be designed for hearing-impaired residents. All public areas of the shelter must have at least one working smoke detector. There must also be a second means of exiting the building in the event of fire or other emergency.

(c) Minimum standards for permanent housing. The recipient or subrecipient cannot use ESG funds to help a program participant remain or move into housing that does not meet the minimum habitability standards provided in this paragraph (c). The recipient may also establish standards that exceed or add to these minimum standards.

(1) Structure and materials. The structures must be structurally sound to protect residents from the elements and not pose any threat to the health and safety of the residents.

(2) Space and security. Each resident must be provided adequate space and security for themselves and their belongings. Each resident must be provided an acceptable place to sleep.

(3) Interior air quality. Each room or space must have a natural or mechanical means of ventilation. The interior air must be free of pollutants at a level that might threaten or harm the health of residents.

(4) Water supply. The water supply must be free from contamination.

(5) Sanitary facilities. Residents must have access to sufficient sanitary facilities that are in proper operating condition, are private, and are adequate for personal cleanliness and the disposal of human waste.

(6) Thermal environment. The housing must have any necessary heating/cooling facilities in proper operating condition.

(7) Illumination and electricity. The structure must have adequate natural or artificial illumination to permit normal indoor activities and support health and safety. There must be sufficient electrical sources to permit the safe use of electrical appliances in the structure.

(8) Food preparation. All food preparation areas must contain suitable space and equipment to store, prepare, and serve food in a safe and sanitary manner.

(9) Sanitary conditions. The housing must be maintained in a sanitary condition.

(10) Fire safety.

(i) There must be a second means of exiting the building in the event of fire or other emergency.

(ii) Each unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working condition, on each occupied level of the unit. Smoke detectors must be located, to the extent practicable, in a hallway adjacent to a bedroom. If the unit is occupied by hearing impaired persons, smoke detectors must have an alarm system designed for hearing-impaired persons in each bedroom occupied by a hearing-impaired person.

(iii) The public areas of all housing must be equipped with a sufficient number, but not less than one for each area, of battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detectors. Public areas include, but are not limited to, laundry rooms, community rooms, day care centers, hallways, stairwells, and other common areas.