24 CFR § 905.314 - Cost and other limitations.

§ 905.314 Cost and other limitations.

(a) Eligible administrative costs. Where the physical or management improvement costs will benefit programs other than Public Housing, such as the Housing Choice Voucher program or local revitalization programs, eligible administrative costs are limited to the amount directly attributable to the public housing program.

(b) Maximum project cost. The maximum project cost represents the total amount of public housing capital assistance used in connection with the development of a public housing project, and includes:

(1) Project costs that are subject to the TDC limit (i.e., HCC and Community Renewal Costs); and

(2) Project costs that are not subject to the TDC limit (i.e., Additional Project Costs). The total project cost to be funded with public housing capital assistance, as set forth in the proposal and as approved by HUD, becomes the maximum project cost stated in the ACC Amendment. Upon completion of the project, the actual project cost is determined based upon the amount of public housing capital assistance expended for the project, and this becomes the maximum project cost for purposes of the ACC Amendment.

(c) TDC limit.

(1) Public housing funds, including Capital Funds, may not be used to pay for HCC and Community Renewal Costs in excess of the TDC limit, as determined under paragraph (b)(2) of this section. However, HOPE VI grantees will be eligible to request a TDC exception for public housing and HOPE VI funds awarded in FFY 1996 and prior years. PHAs may also request a TDC exception for integrated utility management, capital planning, and other capital and management activities that promote energy conservation and efficiency. HUD will examine the request for TDC exceptions to ensure that they would be cost-effective, so as to ensure that up-front expenditures subject to the exceptions would be justified by future cost savings.

(2) Determination of TDC limit. HUD will determine the TDC limit for a public housing project as follows:

(i) Step 1: Unit construction cost guideline. HUD will first determine the applicable “construction cost guideline” by averaging the current construction costs as listed in two nationally recognized residential construction cost indices for publicly bid construction of a good and sound quality for specific bedroom sizes and structure types. The two indices HUD will use for this purpose are the R.S. Means cost index for construction of “average” quality and the Marshall & Swift cost index for construction of “good” quality. HUD has the discretion to change the cost indices to other such indices that reflect comparable housing construction quality through a notice published in the Federal Register.

(ii) Step 2: Bedroom size and structure types. The construction cost guideline is then multiplied by the number of units for each bedroom size and structure type.

(iii) Step 3: Elevator and nonelevator type structures. HUD will then multiply the resulting amounts from step 2 by 1.6 for elevator type structures and by 1.75 for nonelevator type structures.

(iv) Step 4: TDC limit. The TDC limit for a project is calculated by adding the resulting amounts from step 3 for all the public housing units in the project.

(3) Costs not subject to the TDC limit. Additional project costs are not subject to the TDC limit.

(4) Funds not subject to the TDC limit. A PHA may use funding sources not subject to the TDC limit (e.g., Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds, low-income housing tax credits, private donations, private financing, etc.) to cover project costs that exceed the TDC limit or the HCC limit described in this paragraph (c). Such funds, however, may not be used for items that would result in substantially increased operating, maintenance, or replacement costs, and must meet the requirements of section 102 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 1989 (Pub. L. 101-235, approved December 15, 1989) (42 U.S.C. 3545). These funds must be included in the project development cost budget.

(d) Housing Construction Costs (HCC).

(1) General. A PHA may not use Capital Funds to pay for HCC in excess of the amount determined under paragraph (d)(2) of this section.

(2) Determination of HCC limit. HUD will determine the HCC limit as listed in at least two nationally recognized residential construction cost indices for publicly bid construction of a good and sound quality for specific bedroom sizes and structure types. The two indices HUD will use for this purpose are the R.S. Means cost index for construction of “average” quality and the Marshal & Swift cost index for construction of “good” quality. HUD has the discretion to change the cost indices to other such indices that reflect comparable housing construction quality through a notice published in the Federal Register. The resulting construction cost guideline is then multiplied by the number of public housing units in the project, based upon bedroom size and structure type. The HCC limit for a project is calculated by adding the resulting amounts for all public housing units in the project.

(3) The HCC limit is not applicable to the acquisition of existing housing, whether or not such housing will be rehabilitated. The TDC limit is applicable to such acquisition.

(e) Community Renewal Costs. Capital Funds may be used to pay for Community Renewal Costs in an amount equivalent to the difference between the HCC paid for with public housing capital assistance and the TDC limit.

(f) Rehabilitation of existing public housing projects. The HCC limit is not applicable to the rehabilitation of existing public housing projects. The TDC limit for modernization of existing public housing is 90 percent of the TDC limit as determined under paragraph (c) of this section. This limitation does not apply to the rehabilitation of any property acquired pursuant to § 905.600 of this part.

(g) Modernization cost limits. If the modernization costs are more than 90 percent of the TDC, then the project shall not be modernized. Capital Funds shall not be expended to modernize an existing public housing development that fails to meet the HUD definition of reasonable cost found in § 905.108 of this part, except for:

(1) Emergency work;

(2) Essential maintenance necessary to keep a public housing project habitable until the demolition or disposition application is approved; or

(3) The costs of maintaining the safety and security of a site that is undergoing demolition.

(h) Administrative cost limits and Capital Fund Program Fee.

(1) Administrative cost limits (for non-asset-management PHAs). The PHA shall not budget or expend more than 10 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant on administrative costs, in accordance with the CFP 5-Year Action Plan.

(2) Capital Fund Program Fee (for asset-management PHAs). For a PHA that is under asset management, the Capital Fund Program Fee and administrative cost limits are the same. For the Capital Fund Program Fee, a PHA may charge a management fee of up to 10 percent of the annual CFP formula grant(s) amount, excluding emergency and disaster grants and also excluding any costs related to lead-based paint or asbestos testing, in-house architectural and engineering work, or other special administrative costs required by state or local law.

(i) Modernization. The PHA shall not budget or expend more than 10 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant on administrative costs, in accordance with its CFP 5-Year Action Plan. The 10 percent limit excludes any costs related to lead-based paint or asbestos testing, in-house Architectural and Engineering work, or other special administrative costs required by state or local law.

(ii) Development. For development work with Capital Fund and RHF grants, the administrative cost limit is 3 percent of the total project budget, or, with HUD's approval, up to 6 percent of the total project budget.

(i) Management improvement cost limits. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2014, a PHA shall not use more than 18 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant for eligible management improvement costs identified in its CFP 5-Year Action Plan. In FY 2015, a PHA shall not use more than 16 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant for eligible management improvement costs identified in its CFP 5-Year Action Plan. In FY 2016, a PHA shall not use more than 14 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant for eligible management improvement costs identified in its CFP 5-Year Action Plan. In FY 2017, a PHA shall not use more than 12 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant for eligible management improvement costs identified in its CFP 5-Year Action Plan. In FY 2018 and thereafter, a PHA shall not use more than 10 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant for eligible management improvement costs identified in its CFP 5-Year Action Plan. Management improvements are an eligible expense for PHAs participating in asset management.

(j) Types of labor. A PHA may use force account labor for development and modernization activities if included in a CFP 5-Year Action Plan that is approved by the PHA Board of Commissioners and HUD. HUD approval to use force account labor is not required when the PHA is designated as a high performer under PHAS.

(k) RMC activities. When the entire development, financing, or modernization activity, including the planning and architectural design, is administered by an RMC, the PHA shall not retain any portion of the Capital Funds for any administrative or other reason, unless the PHA and the RMC provide otherwise by contract.

(l) Capital Funds for operating costs. A PHA may use Capital Funds for operating costs only if it is included in the CFP 5-Year Action Plan that is approved by the PHA Board of Commissioners and HUD, and limited as described in paragraphs (l)(1) and (2) of this section. Capital Funds identified in the CFP 5-Year Action Plan to be transferred to operations are obligated once the funds have been budgeted and drawn down by the PHA. Once such transfer of funds occurs, the PHA must follow the requirements of 24 CFR part 990 with respect to those funds.

(1) Large PHAs. A PHA with 250 or more units may use no more than 20 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant for activities that are eligible under the Operating Fund at 24 CFR part 990.

(2) Small PHAs. A PHA with less than 250 units, that is not designated as troubled under PHAS, may use up to 100 percent of its annual Capital Fund grant for activities that are eligible under the Operating Fund at 24 CFR part 990, except that the PHA must have determined that there are no debt service payments, significant Capital Fund needs, or emergency needs that must be met prior to transferring 100 percent of its funds to operating expenses.