26 CFR § 1.1202-1 - Deduction for capital gains.

§ 1.1202-1 Deduction for capital gains.

(a) In computing gross income, adjusted gross income, taxable income, capital gain net income (net capital gain for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1977) and net capital loss, 100 percent of any gain or loss (computed under section 1001, recognized under section 1002, and taken into account without regard to subchapter P (section 1201 and following), chapter 1 of the Code) upon the sale or exchange of a capital asset shall be taken into account regardless of the period for which the capital asset has been held. Nevertheless, the net short-term capital gain or loss and the net long-term capital gain or loss must be separately computed. In computing the adjusted gross income or the taxable income of a taxpayer other than a corporation, if for any taxable year the net long-term capital gain exceeds the net short-term capital loss, 50 percent of the amount of the excess is allowable as a deduction from gross income under section 1202.

(b) For the purpose of computing the deduction allowable under section 1202 in the case of an estate or trust, any long-term or short-term capital gains which, under sections 652 and 662, are includible in the gross income of its income beneficiaries as gains derived from the sale or exchange of capital assets must be excluded in determining whether, for the taxable year of the estate or trust, its net long-term capital gain exceeds its net short-term capital loss. To determine the extent to which such gains are includible in the gross income of a beneficiary, see the regulations under sections 652 and 662. For example, during 1954 a trust realized a gain of $1,000 upon the sale of stock held for 10 months. Under the terms of the trust instrument all of such gain must be distributed during the taxable year to A, the sole income beneficiary. Assuming that under section 652 or 662 A must include all of such gain in his gross income, the trust is not entitled to any deduction with respect to such gain under section 1202. Assuming A had no other capital gains or losses for 1954, he would be entitled to a deduction of $500 under section 1202. For purposes of this section, an income beneficiary shall be any beneficiary to whom an amount is required to be distributed, or is paid or credited, which is includible in his gross income.

(c) The provisions of this section may be illustrated by the following example:

Example:
A, an individual, had the following transactions in 1954:
Long-term capital gain $6,000
Long-term capital loss 4,000
Net long-term capital gain $2,000
Short-term capital loss 1,800
Short-term capital gain 300
Net short-term capital loss 1,500
Excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss 500
Since the net long-term capital gain exceeds the net short-term capital loss by $500, 50 percent of the excess, or $250, is allowable as a deduction under section 1202.
[T.D. 6500, 25 FR 12001, Nov. 26, 1960, as amended by T.D. 7728, 45 FR 72650, Nov. 3, 1980]

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