26 CFR § 1.613-2 - Percentage depletion rates.

§ 1.613-2 Percentage depletion rates.

(a)In general. Subject to the provisions of paragraph (b) of this section and as provided in section 613(b), in the case of mines, wells, or other natural deposits, a taxpayer may deduct as an allowance for depletion under section 611 the percentages of gross income from the property as set forth in subparagraphs (1), (2), and (3) of this paragraph.

(1)Without regard to situs of deposits. The following rates are applicable to the minerals listed in this subparagraph regardless of the situs of the deposits from which the minerals are produced:

(i) 27 1/2 percent - Gas wells, oil wells.

(ii) 23 percent - Sulfur, uranium.

(iii) 15 percent - Ball clay, bentonite, china clay, metal mines, 1 sagger clay, rock asphalt, vermiculite.

1 Not applicable if the rate prescribed in subparagraph (2) of this paragraph is applicable.

(iv) 10 percent - Asbestos, 1 brucite, coal, lignite, perlite, sodium chloride, wollastonite.

(v) 5 percent - Brick and tile clay, gravel, mollusk shells (including clam shells and oyster shells), peat, pumice, sand, scoria, shale, stone (except dimension or ornamental stone). If from brine wells - Bromine, calcium chloride, magnesium chloride.

(2)Production from United States deposits. A rate of 23 percent is applicable to the minerals listed in this subparagraph if 2 produced from deposits within the United States: 3

2 The rate prescribed in this subparagraph does not apply except to the extent that alumina and aluminum compounds are extracted therefrom.

3 Applicable only for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964.

Anorthosite. 2
Asbestos.
Bauxite.
Beryl. 3
Celestite.
Chromite.
Corundum.
Fluorspar.
Graphite.
Ilmenite.
Kyanite.
Mica.
Olivine.
Quartz crystals (radio grade).
Rutile.
Block Steatite talc.
Zircon.
Ores of the following metals -
Antimony.
Beryllium. 4
Bismuth.
Cadmium.
Cobalt.
Columbium.
Lead
Lithium.
Manganese.
Mercury.
Nickel.
Platinum.
latinum group metals.
Tantalum.
Thorium.
Tin.
Titanium.
Tungsten.
Vanadium.
Zinc.

4 Applicable only for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963.

(3)Other minerals. A rate of 15 percent is applicable to the minerals listed in this subparagraph regardless of the situs of the deposits from which the minerals are produced, provided the minerals are not used or sold for use by the mine owner or operator as rip rap, ballast, road material, rubble, concrete aggregates, or for similar purposes. If, however, such minerals are sold or used for the purposes described in the preceding sentence, a rate of 5 percent is applicable to any of such minerals unless sold on bid in direct competition with a bona fide bid to sell any of the minerals listed in subdivision (iii) of subparagraph (1) of this paragraph, in which case the rate is 15 percent. In addition, the provisions of this subparagraph are not applicable with respect to any of the minerals listed herein if the rate prescribed in subparagraph (2) of this paragraph is applicable.

Aplite.
Barite.
Bauxite.
Beryl. 5
Borax.
Calcium carbonates.
Clay, refractory and fire. 6
Diatomaceous earth.
Dolomite.
Fedlspar.
Flake Graphite.

5 Applicable only for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964.

6 Not applicable for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1960.

(4) For purposes of this section, the term all other minerals does not include (i) soil, sod, dirt, turf, water, or mosses; or (ii) minerals from sea water, the air, or similar inexhaustible sources. However, the term all other minerals is not limited in meaning to the minerals listed in section 613(b), but includes all other minerals (except those to which a specific percentage rate applies under subparagraphs (1), (2), (3), (4), and (5) of section 613(b)): For example, gypsum, novaculite, natural mineral pigments, quartz sand and quartz pebbles, graphite and kyanite (if section 613(b)(2)(B) does not apply), and anorthosite to the extent that alumina and aluminum compounds are not extracted therefrom. The 15-percent rate applies to such all other minerals when used or sold for use by the mine owner or operator for purposes other than as rip rap, ballast, road material, rubble, concrete aggregates, or for similar purposes. When any such minerals are used or sold for use by the mine owner or operator as rip rap, ballast, road material, rubble, concrete aggregates, or for similar purposes, the 5-percent rate applies except that, when sold for such use by the mine owner or operator on a bid in direct competition with a bona fide bid to sell a mineral listed in section 613(b)(3), the 15-percent rate applies. For example, limestone sold on a bid in direct competition with a bona fide bid to sell rock asphalt for road building purposes may be entitled to a 15-percent rate. In every case the taxpayer must establish to the satisfaction of the district director that there was a bona fide bid to sell a mineral listed under section 613(b)(3) by a person other than the taxpayer, and that the mineral sold by the taxpayer was sold on a bid in direct competition with such bona fide bid to sell such other material. 7

7 The 15-percent rate is applicable only to stone used or sold for use by the mine owner or operator as dimension stone or ornamental stone.

Fluorspar
Fullers earth.
Barnet.
Gilsonite.
Granite
Lepidolite.
Limestone.
Magnesite.
Magnesium carbonates
Marble.
Mica
Phosphate rock.
Potash.
Quartzite.
Slate.
Soapstone.
Spodumene.
Stone (dimension or 7 ornamental).
Talc (including pyrophyllite).
Thernardite.
Tripoli.
Trona.
All other minerals

(b)Definition of terms.

(1) For purposes of this section, the minerals indicated below shall have the following meanings:

(i) Clay, brick and tile - Clay used or sold for use in the manufacture of common brick, drain and roofing tile, sewer pipe, flower pots, and kindred products (other than clay specifically identified as a clay for which a 15 percent rate of percentage allowance is provided).

(ii) Clay, refractory and fire - Clay which has a pyrometric cone equivalent of 19 or higher.

(iii) Pumice - All pumice including pumicite.

(iv) Scoria - Only scoria produced from natural deposits.

(2) For purposes of this section, the term United States means the States and the District of Columbia. See section 7701(a)(9).

(3) For purposes of this section, the term dimension stone means blocks and slabs of natural stone, subsequently cut to definite shapes and sizes and used or sold for such uses as building stone (excluding rubble), monumental stone, paving blocks, curbing and flagging. For purposes of this section, ornamental stone means blocks and slabs of natural stone, subsequently cut to definite shapes and sizes and used or sold for use for making ornaments or statues.

(c)Rules for application of paragraph (a) of this section.

(1) In no case may the allowance for depletion computed upon the basis of a percentage of gross income from the property exceed 50 percent of the taxpayer's taxable income from the property (computed without allowance for depletion). For rules relating to the computation of such taxable income, see § 1.613-5.

(2) In cases in which there are produced from a mineral property two or more minerals, each entitled to a different percentage depletion rate under section 613(b) and this section or any of which is entitled to cost depletion only, the percentage depletion allowance is the sum of the results obtained by applying the percentage applicable to each mineral (zero, if not entitled to percentage depletion) to the gross income from the property attributable to such mineral. The sum so computed is subject to the limitation provided in section 613(a) and § 1.613-1, that is, 50 percent of the taxpayer's taxable income from the property (computed without allowance for depletion). Such taxable income (computed in accordance with § 1.613-4) is the total taxable income resulting from the sale of all minerals produced from the mineral property (as defined in section 614 and the regulations thereunder). The provisions of this subparagraph may be illustrated by the following examples:

Example 1.
Pyrite, an iron sulfide, may be sold for either its sulfur content or its iron content, or both. Sulfur is entitled to a percentage depletion deduction based on 23 percent of gross income from the property whereas the percentage depletion deduction for iron is based on 15 percent of such gross income. Therefore, in the case of a taxpayer who sells pyrite for both its sulfur and iron content, 23 percent of his gross income from sulfur plus 15 percent of his gross income from iron would be his maximum allowable percentage depletion deduction. However, this maximum deduction would be subject to the limitation provided for in section 613(a), i.e., 50 percent of taxable income from the property (computed without allowance for depletion), such taxable income being the overall taxable income resulting from the sale of both minerals contained in the deposit.
Example 2.
Oil and gas are produced from a single mineral property of a taxpayer who operates a retail outlet for the sale of oil products within the meaning of section 613A(d)(2). The taxpayer is not entitled to percentage depletion on the gross income attributable to the oil, but is entitled to percentage depletion on the gross income attributable to gas which is regulated gas under section 613A(b)(2)(B). Accordingly, the taxpayer's maximum allowable percentage depletion deduction would be zero percent of gross income from the property with respect to oil, plus 22 percent (see section 613A(b)(1)) of gross income from the property with respect to gas. This maximum deduction would be subject to the limitation provided for in section 613(a), i.e., 50 percent of taxable income from the property (computed without allowance for depletion), such taxable income being the overall taxable income resulting from the sale of both oil and gas. However, in the case of oil or gas production which qualifies for percentage depletion under section 613A(c), see the special allocation rules contained in section 613A(c)(7) (C) and (E) and § 1.613A-4.

(3) Except as provided in section 613(d) and the regulations thereunder relating to special rules for determining rates of depletion for taxable years ending after December 31, 1953, to which the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 applies:

(i) The percentage rates set forth in this section are applicable only for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1953, and ending after August 16, 1954; and

(ii) The percentage rates set forth in 26 CFR (1939) 39.23(m)-5 (Regulations 118) are applicable for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1954, or ending before August 17, 1954.

(4) Percentage depletion is not allowable with respect to the income from a disposal of coal (including lignite) or domesticiron ore (as defined in paragraph (e) of § 1.631-3) with a retained economic interest to the extent that such income is treated as from a sale of coal or iron ore under section 631(c) and § 1.631-3. Rents or royalties paid or incurred by a taxpayer with respect to coal (including lignite) or domesticiron ore shall be excluded by such taxpayer in determining gross income from the property without regard to the treatment under section 631(c) of such rents and royalties in the hands of the recipient.

(5)

(i) In all cases there shall be excluded in determining the gross income from the property an amount equal to any rents or royalties (which are depletable income to the payee) which are paid or incurred by the taxpayer in respect of the property and are not otherwise excluded from gross income from the property. The following example illustrates this rule:

Example.
A leases coal-bearing lands to B on condition that B will annually pay a royalty of 25 cents a ton on coal mined and sold by B. During the year 1956, B mines and sells f.o.b. mine 100,000 tons of coal for $600,000. In computing gross income from the property for the year 1956, B will exclude $25,000 (100,000 tons × $0.25) in computing his allowable percentage depletion deduction. B's allowable percentage depletion deduction (without reference to the limitation based on taxable income from the property) for the year 1956 will be $57,500 (($600,000−$25,000) × 10 percent).

(ii) If bonus payments have been paid in respect of the property in any taxable year or any prior taxable years, there shall be excluded in determining the gross income from the property, an amount equal to that part of such payments which is allocable to the product sold (or otherwise giving rise to gross income) for the taxable year. For purposes of the preceding sentence, bonus payments include payments by the lessee with respect to a production payment which is treated as a bonus under section 636(c). Such a production payment is equally allocable to all mineral from the mineral property burdened thereby. The following examples illustrate the provisions of this subdivision:

Example 1.
In 1956, A leases oil bearing lands to B, receiving $200,000 as a bonus and reserving a royalty of one-eighth of the proceeds of all oil produced and sold. It is estimated at the time the lease is entered into that there are 1,000,000 barrels of oil recoverable. In 1956, B produces and sells 100,000 barrels for $240,000. In computing his gross income from the property for the year 1956, B will exclude $30,000 ( 1/8 of $240,000), the royalty paid to A, and $20,000 (100,000 bbls. sold/1,000,000 bbls. estimated to be available × $200,000 bonus), the portion of the bonus allocable to the oil produced and sold during the year. However, in computing B's taxable income under section 63, the $20,000 attributable to the bonus payment shall not be either excluded or deducted from B's gross income computed under section 61. (See paragraph (a)(3) of § 1.612-3.)
Example 2.
In 1971, C leases to D oil bearing lands estimated to contain 1,000,000 barrels of oil, reserving a royalty of one-eighth of the proceeds of all oil produced and sold and a $500,000 production payment payable out of 50 percent of the first oil produced and sold attributable to the seven-eighths operating interest. In 1972, D produces and sells 100,000 barrels of oil. In computing his gross income from the property for the year 1972, D will exclude, in addition to the royalty paid to C, $50,000 (100,000 bbls. sold/1,000,000 bbls. estimated to be available × $500,000 treated under section 636(c) as a bonus), the portion of the production payment allocable to the oil produced and sold during the taxable year. However, in computing D's taxable income under section 63, the $50,000 attributable to the retained production payment shall not be either excluded or deducted from D's gross income computed under section 61.

(iii) If advanced royalties have been paid in respect of the property in any taxable year, the amount excluded from gross income from the property of the payor for the current taxable year on account of such payment, shall be an amount equal to the deduction for such taxable year taken on account of such payment pursuant to paragraph (b)(3) of § 1.612-3.

Example.
If B in example 2 in paragraph (b)(4) of § 1.612-3, elects to deduct in 1956 the $10,000 paid to A in that year, he must exclude the same amount from gross income from the property in 1956; however, if B elects to defer the deduction until 1957 when he mined and sold the mineral, he must exclude the $10,000 from gross income from the property in 1957.
[T.D. 6500, 25 FR 11737, Nov. 26, 1960, as amended by T.D. 6841, 30 FR 9306, July 27, 1965; T.D. 7170, 37 FR 5374, Mar. 15, 1972; T.D. 7261, 38 FR 5467, Mar. 1, 1973; T.D. 7487, 42 FR 24263, May 13, 1977]