27 CFR § 555.207 - Construction of type 1 magazines.

§ 555.207 Construction of type 1 magazines.

A type 1 magazine is a permanent structure: a building, an igloo or “Army-type structure”, a tunnel, or a dugout. It is to be bullet-resistant, fire-resistant, weather-resistant, theft-resistant, and ventilated.

(a) Buildings. All building type magazines are to be constructed of masonry, wood, metal, or a combination of these materials, and have no openings except for entrances and ventilation. The ground around building magazines must slope away for drainage or other adequate drainage provided.

(1) Masonry wall construction. Masonry wall construction is to consist of brick, concrete, tile, cement block, or cinder block and be not less than 6 inches in thickness. Hollow masonry units used in construction must have all hollow spaces filled with well-tamped, coarse, dry sand or weak concrete (at least a mixture of one part cement and eight parts of sand with enough water to dampen the mixture while tamping in place). Interior walls are to be constructed of, or covered with, a nonsparking material.

(2) Fabricated metal wall construction. Metal wall construction is to consist of sectional sheets of steel or aluminum not less than number 14-gauge, securely fastened to a metal framework. Metal wall construction is either lined inside with brick, solid cement blocks, hardwood not less than four inches thick, or will have at least a six inch sand fill between interior and exterior walls. Interior walls are to be constructed of, or covered with, a nonsparking material.

(3) Wood frame wall construction. The exterior of outer wood walls is to be covered with iron or aluminum not less than number 26-gauge. An inner wall of, or covered with nonsparking material will be constructed so as to provide a space of not less than six inches between the outer and inner walls. The space is to be filled with coarse, dry sand or weak concrete.

(4) Floors. Floors are to be constructed of, or covered with, a nonsparking material and shall be strong enough to bear the weight of the maximum quantity to be stored. Use of pallets covered with a nonsparking material is considered equivalent to a floor constructed of or covered with a nonsparking material.

(5) Foundations. Foundations are to be constructed of brick, concrete, cement block, stone, or wood posts. If piers or posts are used, in lieu of a continuous foundation, the space under the buildings is to be enclosed with metal.

(6) Roof. Except for buildings with fabricated metal roofs, the outer roof is to be covered with no less than number 26-guage iron or aluminum, fastened to at least 7/8 inch sheathing.

(7) Bullet-resistant ceilings or roofs. Where it is possible for a bullet to be fired directly through the roof and into the magazine at such an angle that the bullet would strike the explosives within, the magazine is to be protected by one of the following methods:

(i) A sand tray lined with a layer of building paper, plastic, or other nonporous material, and filled with not less than four inches of coarse, dry sand, and located at the tops of inner walls covering the entire ceiling area, except that portion necessary for ventilation.

(ii) A fabricated metal roof constructed of 3/16-inch plate steel lined with four inches of hardwood. (For each additional 1/16 inch of plate steel, the hardwood lining may be decreased one inch.)

(8) Doors. All doors are to be constructed of not less than 1/4 inch plate steel and lined with at least two inches of hardwood. Hinges and hasps are to be attached to the doors by welding, riveting or bolting (nuts on inside of door). They are to be installed in such a manner that the hinges and hasps cannot be removed when the doors are closed and locked.

(9) Locks. Each door is to be equipped with (i) two mortise locks; (ii) two padlock fastened in separate hasps and staples; (iii) a combination of a mortise lock and a padlock; (iv) a mortise lock that requires two keys to open; or (v) a three-point lock. Padlocks must have at least five tumblers and a casehardened shackle of at least 3/8 inch diameter. Padlocks must be protected with not less than 1/4 inch steel hoods constructed so as to prevent sawing or lever action on the locks, hasps, and staples. These requirements do not apply to magazine doors that are adequately secured on the inside by means of a bolt, lock, or bar that cannot be actuated from the outside.

(10) Ventilation. Ventilation is to be provided to prevent dampness and heating of stored explosive materials. Ventilation openings must be screened to prevent the entrance of sparks. Ventilation openings in side walls and foundations must be offset or shielded for bullet-resistant purposes. Magazines having foundation and roof ventilators with the air circulating between the side walls and the floors and between the side walls and the ceiling must have a wooden lattice lining or equivalent to prevent the packages of explosive materials from being stacked against the side walls and blocking the air circulation.

(11) Exposed metal. No sparking material is to be exposed to contact with the stored explosive materials. All ferrous metal nails in the floor and side walls, which might be exposed to contact with explosive materials, must be blind nailed, countersunk, or covered with a nonsparking lattice work or other nonsparking material.

(b) Igloos, “Army-type structures”, tunnels, and dugouts. Igloo, “Army-type structure”, tunnel, and dugout magazines are to be constructed of reinforced concrete, masonry, metal, or a combination of these materials. They must have an earthmound covering of not less than 24 inches on the top, sides and rear unless the magazine meets the requirements of paragraph (a)(7) of this section. Interior walls and floors must be constructed of, or covered with, a nonsparking material. Magazines of this type are also to be constructed in conformity with the requirements of paragraph (a)(4) and paragraphs (a)(8) through (11) of this section.

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