29 CFR § 779.365 - May qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) or 13(a)(4) establishments.

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§ 779.365 May qualify as exempt 13(a)(2) or 13(a)(4) establishments.

(a) An establishment engaged in the selling of tires, tubes, accessories and of repair services on tires may qualify as an exempt retail or service establishment under section 13(a)(2) of the Act if it meets all the requirements of that exemption. Similarly, an establishment engaged in retreading or recapping tires may qualify as an exempt establishment under section 13(a)(4) of the Act if it meets all the requirements of that exemption.

(b)

(1) In determining whether, under the 13(a)(2) exemption, 75 percent of the establishment's sales are not made for resale and are recognized as retail sales in the industry, sales other than those described hereinafter in the subparagraphs of this paragraph may be so counted if they meet all the requirements for such classification as previously explained in this subpart. Not eligible for inclusion in the requisite 75 percent are sales of goods that cannot be the subject of a retail sale because the goods are not of a “retailable” type or the sales of such goods lack the “retail concept” (see § 779.321). Nor can sales for resale be counted toward the 75 percent. For example, sales of tires, tubes, accessories or services to garages, service stations, repair shops, tire dealers and automobile dealers, to be sold or to be used in reconditioning vehicles for sale are sales for resale. Further, the sales of tires, tubes, accessories and tire repair services, including retreading and recapping, which are described in the following paragraphs (b) (2) through (7), are not recognized as retail in the industry.

(2) Sales made pursuant to a formal invitation to bid: Such sales are made under a procedure involving the issuance by the buyer of a formal invitation to bid on certain merchandise for delivery in accordance with prescribed terms and specifications. Sales to the Federal, State and local governments are typically made in this manner.

(3) Sales to “national accounts” as known in the trades; that is, sales where delivery is made by the local tire dealer under a centralized pricing arrangement between the customer's national office and the tire manufacturer; payment may be made either to the local dealer or direct to the tire manufacturer under a centralized billing arrangement with the customer's national office.

(4) Sales to fleet accounts at wholesale prices: As used in this section, a “fleet account” is a customer operating five or more automobiles or trucks for business purposes. Wholesale prices for tires, tubes, and accessories are prices equivalent to, or less than, those typically charged on sales for resale. If the establishment makes no sales of passenger car tires for resale, the wholesale price of such tires will be taken to be the price typically charged in the area on sales of passenger car tires for resale. If the establishment makes no sales of truck tires for resale, the wholesale price of such tires will be taken to be the price charged by the establishment on sales of truck tires to fleet accounts operating 10 or more commercial vehicles, or if the establishment makes no such sales, the wholesale price will be taken to be the price typically charged in the area on sales of truck tires to fleet accounts operating 10 or more commercial vehicles. (See Wirtz v. Steepleton General Tire, 383 U.S. 190, 202, rehearing denied 383 U.S. 963.)

(5) Sales of a tire rental service on a mileage basis known in the trade as “mileage contracts”: This is a leasing arrangement under which a tire dealer agrees to provide and maintain tires or tubes for motor vehicles of a fleet account.

(6) Sales of servicing and repair work performed under a fleet maintenance arrangement on tires for trucks and other automotive vehicles whereby the establishment undertakes to maintain the tires or tubes for a fleet account at a price below the prevailing retail price.

(7) Sales, repair, recapping, or rental of truck or machinery tires suitable for use only on trucks or equipment of a specialized kind that cannot themselves be the subject of a retail sale because their lack of a concept of “retailability” as previously explained precludes the recognition of their sale as “retail;” to any industry.