40 CFR 1065.145 - Gaseous and PM probes, transfer lines, and sampling system components.

§ 1065.145 Gaseous and PM probes, transfer lines, and sampling system components.

(a)Continuous and batch sampling. Determine the total mass of each constituent with continuous or batch sampling. Both types of sampling systems have probes, transfer lines, and other sampling system components that are described in this section.

(b)Options for engines with multiple exhaust stacks. Measure emissions from a test engine as described in this paragraph (b) if it has multiple exhaust stacks. You may choose to use different measurement procedures for different pollutants under this paragraph (b) for a given test. For purposes of this part 1065, the test engine includes all the devices related to converting the chemical energy in the fuel to the engine's mechanical output energy. This may or may not involve vehicle- or equipment-based devices. For example, all of an engine's cylinders are considered to be part of the test engine even if the exhaust is divided into separate exhaust stacks. As another example, all the cylinders of a diesel-electric locomotive are considered to be part of the test engine even if they transmit power through separate output shafts, such as might occur with multiple engine-generator sets working in tandem. Use one of the following procedures to measure emissions with multiple exhaust stacks:

(1) Route the exhaust flow from the multiple stacks into a single flow as described in § 1065.130(c)(6). Sample and measure emissions after the exhaust streams are mixed. Calculate the emissions as a single sample from the entire engine. We recommend this as the preferred option, since it requires only a single measurement and calculation of the exhaust molar flow for the entire engine.

(2) Sample and measure emissions from each stack and calculate emissions separately for each stack. Add the mass (or mass rate) emissions from each stack to calculate the emissions from the entire engine. Testing under this paragraph (b)(2) requires measuring or calculating the exhaust molar flow for each stack separately. If the exhaust molar flow in each stack cannot be calculated from combustion air flow(s), fuel flow(s), and measured gaseous emissions, and it is impractical to measure the exhaust molar flows directly, you may alternatively proportion the engine's calculated total exhaust molar flow rate (where the flow is calculated using combustion air mass flow(s), fuel mass flow(s), and emissions concentrations) based on exhaust molar flow measurements in each stack using a less accurate, non-traceable method. For example, you may use a total pressure probe and static pressure measurement in each stack.

(3) Sample and measure emissions from one stack and repeat the duty cycle as needed to collect emissions from each stack separately. Calculate the emissions from each stack and add the separate measurements to calculate the mass (or mass rate) emissions from the entire engine. Testing under this paragraph (b)(3) requires measuring or calculating the exhaust molar flow for each stack separately. You may alternatively proportion the engine's calculated total exhaust molar flow rate based on calculation and measurement limitations as described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. Use the average of the engine's total power or work values from the multiple test runs to calculate brake-specific emissions. Divide the total mass (or mass rate) of each emission by the average power (or work). You may alternatively use the engine power or work associated with the corresponding stack during each test run if these values can be determined for each stack separately.

(4) Sample and measure emissions from each stack separately and calculate emissions for the entire engine based on the stack with the highest concentration. Testing under this paragraph (b)(4) requires only a single exhaust flow measurement or calculation for the entire engine. You may determine which stack has the highest concentration by performing multiple test runs, reviewing the results of earlier tests, or using good engineering judgment. Note that the highest concentration of different pollutants may occur in different stacks. Note also that the stack with the highest concentration of a pollutant during a test interval for field testing may be a different stack than the one you identified based on average concentrations over a duty cycle.

(5) Sample emissions from each stack separately and combine the wet sample streams from each stack proportionally to the exhaust molar flows in each stack. Measure the emission concentrations and calculate the emissions for the entire engine based on these weighted concentrations. Testing under this paragraph (b)(5) requires measuring or calculating the exhaust molar flow for each stack separately during the test run to proportion the sample streams from each stack. If it is impractical to measure the exhaust molar flows directly, you may alternatively proportion the wet sample streams based on less accurate, non-traceable flow methods. For example, you may use a total pressure probe and static pressure measurement in each stack. The following restrictions apply for testing under this paragraph (b)(5):

(i) You must use an accurate, traceable measurement or calculation of the engine's total exhaust molar flow rate for calculating the mass of emissions from the entire engine.

(ii) You may dry the single, combined, proportional sample stream; you may not dry the sample streams from each stack separately.

(iii) You must measure and proportion the sample flows from each stack with active flow controls. For PM sampling, you must measure and proportion the diluted sample flows from each stack with active flow controls that use only smooth walls with no sudden change in cross-sectional area. For example, you may control the dilute exhaust PM sample flows using electrically conductive vinyl tubing and a control device that pinches the tube over a long enough transition length so no flow separation occurs.

(iv) For PM sampling, the transfer lines from each stack must be joined so the angle of the joining flows is 12.5° or less. Note that the exhaust manifold must meet the same specifications as the transfer line according to paragraph (d) of this section.

(6) Sample emissions from each stack separately and combine the wet sample streams from each stack equally. Measure the emission concentrations and calculate the emissions for the entire engine based on these measured concentrations. Testing under this paragraph (b)(6) assumes that the raw-exhaust and sample flows are the same for each stack. The following restrictions apply for testing under this paragraph (b)(6):

(i) You must measure and demonstrate that the sample flow from each stack is within 5% of the value from the stack with the highest sample flow. You may alternatively ensure that the stacks have equal flow rates without measuring sample flows by designing a passive sampling system that meets the following requirements:

(A) The probes and transfer line branches must be symmetrical, have equal lengths and diameters, have the same number of bends, and have no filters.

(B) If probes are designed such that they are sensitive to stack velocity, the stack velocity must be similar at each probe. For example, a static pressure probe used for gaseous sampling is not sensitive to stack velocity.

(C) The stack static pressure must be the same at each probe. You can meet this requirement by placing probes at the end of stacks that are vented to atmosphere.

(D) For PM sampling, the transfer lines from each stack must be joined so the angle of the joining flows is 12.5° or less. Note that the exhaust manifold must meet the same specifications as the transfer line according to paragraph (d) of this section.

(ii) You may use the procedure in this paragraph (b)(6) only if you perform an analysis showing that the resulting error due to imbalanced stack flows and concentrations is either at or below 2%. You may alternatively show that the resulting error does not impact your ability to demonstrate compliance with applicable standards. For example, you may use less accurate, non-traceable measurements of emission concentrations and molar flow in each stack and demonstrate that the imbalances in flows and concentrations cause 2% or less error.

(iii) For a two-stack engine, you may use the procedure in this paragraph (b)(6) only if you can show that the stack with the higher flow has the lower average concentration for each pollutant over the duty cycle.

(iv) You must use an accurate, traceable measurement or calculation of the engine's total exhaust molar flow rate for calculating the mass of emissions from the entire engine.

(v) You may dry the single, equally combined, sample stream; you may not dry the sample streams from each stack separately.

(vi) You may determine your exhaust flow rates with a chemical balance of exhaust gas concentrations and either intake air flow or fuel flow.

(c)Gaseous and PM sample probes. A probe is the first fitting in a sampling system. It protrudes into a raw or diluted exhaust stream to extract a sample, such that its inside and outside surfaces are in contact with the exhaust. A sample is transported out of a probe into a transfer line, as described in paragraph (d) of this section. The following provisions apply to sample probes:

(1)Probe design and construction. Use sample probes with inside surfaces of 300 series stainless steel or, for raw exhaust sampling, use any nonreactive material capable of withstanding raw exhaust temperatures. Locate sample probes where constituents are mixed to their mean sample concentration. Take into account the mixing of any crankcase emissions that may be routed into the raw exhaust. Locate each probe to minimize interference with the flow to other probes. We recommend that all probes remain free from influences of boundary layers, wakes, and eddies - especially near the outlet of a raw-exhaust stack where unintended dilution might occur. Make sure that purging or back-flushing of a probe does not influence another probe during testing. You may use a single probe to extract a sample of more than one constituent as long as the probe meets all the specifications for each constituent.

(2)Gaseous sample probes. Use either single-port or multi-port probes for sampling gaseous emissions. You may orient these probes in any direction relative to the raw or diluted exhaust flow. For some probes, you must control sample temperatures, as follows:

(i) For probes that extract NOX from diluted exhaust, control the probe's wall temperature to prevent aqueous condensation.

(ii) For probes that extract hydrocarbons for THC or NMHC analysis from the diluted exhaust of compression-ignition engines, two-stroke spark-ignition engines, or four-stroke spark-ignition engines at or below 19 kW, we recommend heating the probe to minimize hydrocarbon contamination consistent with good engineering judgment. If you routinely fail the contamination check in the 1065.520 pretest check, we recommend heating the probe section to approximately 190 °C to minimize contamination.

(3)PM sample probes. Use PM probes with a single opening at the end. Orient PM probes to face directly upstream. If you shield a PM probe's opening with a PM pre-classifier such as a hat, you may not use the preclassifier we specify in paragraph (f)(1) of this section. We recommend sizing the inside diameter of PM probes to approximate isokinetic sampling at the expected mean flow rate.

(d)Transfer lines. You may use transfer lines to transport an extracted sample from a probe to an analyzer, storage medium, or dilution system, noting certain restrictions for PM sampling in § 1065.140(e). Minimize the length of all transfer lines by locating analyzers, storage media, and dilution systems as close to probes as practical. We recommend that you minimize the number of bends in transfer lines and that you maximize the radius of any unavoidable bend. Avoid using 90° elbows, tees, and cross-fittings in transfer lines. Where such connections and fittings are necessary, take steps, using good engineering judgment, to ensure that you meet the temperature tolerances in this paragraph (d). This may involve measuring temperature at various locations within transfer lines and fittings. You may use a single transfer line to transport a sample of more than one constituent, as long as the transfer line meets all the specifications for each constituent. The following construction and temperature tolerances apply to transfer lines:

(1)Gaseous samples. Use transfer lines with inside surfaces of 300 series stainless steel, PTFE, Viton TM, or any other material that you demonstrate has better properties for emission sampling. For raw exhaust sampling, use a non-reactive material capable of withstanding raw exhaust temperatures. You may use in-line filters if they do not react with exhaust constituents and if the filter and its housing meet the same temperature requirements as the transfer lines, as follows:

(i) For NOX transfer lines upstream of either an NO2-to-NO converter that meets the specifications of § 1065.378 or a chiller that meets the specifications of § 1065.376, maintain a sample temperature that prevents aqueous condensation.

(ii) For THC transfer lines for testing compression-ignition engines, two-stroke spark-ignition engines, or four-stroke spark-ignition engines at or below 19 kW, maintain a wall temperature tolerance throughout the entire line of (191 ±11) °C. If you sample from raw exhaust, you may connect an unheated, insulated transfer line directly to a probe. Design the length and insulation of the transfer line to cool the highest expected raw exhaust temperature to no lower than 191 °C, as measured at the transfer line's outlet. For dilute sampling, you may use a transition zone between the probe and transfer line of up to 92 cm to allow your wall temperature to transition to (191 ±11) °C.

(2)PM samples. We recommend heated transfer lines or a heated enclosure to minimize temperature differences between transfer lines and exhaust constituents. Use transfer lines that are inert with respect to PM and are electrically conductive on the inside surfaces. We recommend using PM transfer lines made of 300 series stainless steel. Electrically ground the inside surface of PM transfer lines.

(e)Optional sample-conditioning components for gaseous sampling. You may use the following sample-conditioning components to prepare gaseous samples for analysis, as long as you do not install or use them in a way that adversely affects your ability to show that your engines comply with all applicable gaseous emission standards.

(1)NO2-to-NO converter. You may use an NO2-to-NO converter that meets the converter conversion verification specified in § 1065.378 at any point upstream of a NOX analyzer, sample bag, or other storage medium.

(2)Sample dryer. You may use either type of sample dryer described in this paragraph (e)(2) to decrease the effects of water on gaseous emission measurements. You may not use a chemical dryer, or use dryers upstream of PM sample filters.

(i)Osmotic-membrane. You may use an osmotic-membrane dryer upstream of any gaseous analyzer or storage medium, as long as it meets the temperature specifications in paragraph (d)(1) of this section. Because osmotic-membrane dryers may deteriorate after prolonged exposure to certain exhaust constituents, consult with the membrane manufacturer regarding your application before incorporating an osmotic-membrane dryer. Monitor the dewpoint, Tdew, and absolute pressure, ptotal, downstream of an osmotic-membrane dryer. You may use continuously recorded values of Tdew and ptotal in the amount of water calculations specified in § 1065.645. For our testing we may use average temperature and pressure values over the test interval or a nominal pressure value that we estimate as the dryer's average pressure expected during testing as constant values in the amount of water calculations specified in § 1065.645. For your testing, you may use the maximum temperature or minimum pressure values observed during a test interval or duty cycle or the high alarm temperature setpoint or low alarm pressure setpoint as constant values in the calculations specified in § 1065.645. For your testing, you may also use a nominal ptotal, which you may estimate as the dryer's lowest absolute pressure expected during testing.

(ii)Thermal chiller. You may use a thermal chiller upstream of some gas analyzers and storage media. You may not use a thermal chiller upstream of a THC measurement system for compression-ignition engines, two-stroke spark-ignition engines, or four-stroke spark-ignition engines at or below 19 kW. If you use a thermal chiller upstream of an NO2-to-NO converter or in a sampling system without an NO2-to-NO converter, the chiller must meet the NO2 loss-performance check specified in § 1065.376. Monitor the dewpoint, Tdew, and absolute pressure, ptotal, downstream of a thermal chiller. You may use continuously recorded values of Tdew and ptotal in the amount of water calculations specified in § 1065.645. If it is valid to assume the degree of saturation in the thermal chiller, you may calculate Tdew based on the known chiller performance and continuous monitoring of chiller temperature, Tchiller. If it is valid to assume a constant temperature offset between Tchiller and Tdew, due to a known and fixed amount of sample reheat between the chiller outlet and the temperature measurement location, you may factor in this assumed temperature offset value into emission calculations. If we ask for it, you must show by engineering analysis or by data the validity of any assumptions allowed by this paragraph (e)(2)(ii). For our testing we may use average temperature and pressure values over the test interval or a nominal pressure value that we estimate as the dryer's average pressure expected during testing as constant values in the calculations specified in § 1065.645. For your testing you may use the maximum temperature and minimum pressure values observed during a test interval or duty cycle or the high alarm temperature setpoint and the low alarm pressure setpoint as constant values in the amount of water calculations specified in § 1065.645. For your testing you may also use a nominal ptotal, which you may estimate as the dryer's lowest absolute pressure expected during testing.

(3)Sample pumps. You may use sample pumps upstream of an analyzer or storage medium for any gas. Use sample pumps with inside surfaces of 300 series stainless steel, PTFE, or any other material that you demonstrate has better properties for emission sampling. For some sample pumps, you must control temperatures, as follows:

(i) If you use a NOX sample pump upstream of either an NO2-to-NO converter that meets § 1065.378 or a chiller that meets § 1065.376, it must be heated to prevent aqueous condensation.

(ii) For testing compression-ignition engines, two-stroke spark-ignition engines, or four-stroke spark-ignition engines at or below 19 kW, if you use a THC sample pump upstream of a THC analyzer or storage medium, its inner surfaces must be heated to a tolerance of (191 ±11) °C.

(4)Ammonia Scrubber. You may use ammonia scrubbers for any or all gaseous sampling systems to prevent interference with NH3, poisoning of the NO2-to-NO converter, and deposits in the sampling system or analyzers. Follow the ammonia scrubber manufacturer's recommendations or use good engineering judgment in applying ammonia scrubbers.

(f)Optional sample-conditioning components for PM sampling. You may use the following sample-conditioning components to prepare PM samples for analysis, as long as you do not install or use them in a way that adversely affects your ability to show that your engines comply with the applicable PM emission standards. You may condition PM samples to minimize positive and negative biases to PM results, as follows:

(1)PM preclassifier. You may use a PM preclassifier to remove large-diameter particles. The PM preclassifier may be either an inertial impactor or a cyclonic separator. It must be constructed of 300 series stainless steel. The preclassifier must be rated to remove at least 50% of PM at an aerodynamic diameter of 10 µm and no more than 1% of PM at an aerodynamic diameter of 1 µm over the range of flow rates for which you use it. Follow the preclassifier manufacturer's instructions for any periodic servicing that may be necessary to prevent a buildup of PM. Install the preclassifier in the dilution system downstream of the last dilution stage. Configure the preclassifier outlet with a means of bypassing any PM sample media so the preclassifier flow may be stabilized before starting a test. Locate PM sample media within 75 cm downstream of the preclassifier's exit. You may not use this preclassifier if you use a PM probe that already has a preclassifier. For example, if you use a hat-shaped preclassifier that is located immediately upstream of the probe in such a way that it forces the sample flow to change direction before entering the probe, you may not use any other preclassifier in your PM sampling system.

(2)Other components. You may request to use other PM conditioning components upstream of a PM preclassifier, such as components that condition humidity or remove gaseous-phase hydrocarbons from the diluted exhaust stream. You may use such components only if we approve them under § 1065.10.

[ 75 FR 23030, Apr. 30, 2010; 79 FR 23756, Apr. 28, 2014]

This is a list of United States Code sections, Statutes at Large, Public Laws, and Presidential Documents, which provide rulemaking authority for this CFR Part.

This list is taken from the Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules provided by GPO [Government Printing Office].

It is not guaranteed to be accurate or up-to-date, though we do refresh the database weekly. More limitations on accuracy are described at the GPO site.


United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 42 - THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE

§ 7401 - Congressional findings and declaration of purpose

§ 7402 - Cooperative activities

§ 7403 - Research, investigation, training, and other activities

§ 7404 - Research relating to fuels and vehicles

§ 7405 - Grants for support of air pollution planning and control programs

§ 7406 - Interstate air quality agencies; program cost limitations

§ 7407 - Air quality control regions

§ 7408 - Air quality criteria and control techniques

§ 7409 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards

§ 7410 - State implementation plans for national primary and secondary ambient air quality standards

§ 7411 - Standards of performance for new stationary sources

§ 7412 - Hazardous air pollutants

§ 7413 - Federal enforcement

§ 7414 - Recordkeeping, inspections, monitoring, and entry

§ 7415 - International air pollution

§ 7416 - Retention of State authority

§ 7417 - Advisory committees

§ 7418 - Control of pollution from Federal facilities

§ 7419 - Primary nonferrous smelter orders

§ 7420 - Noncompliance penalty

§ 7421 - Consultation

§ 7422 - Listing of certain unregulated pollutants

§ 7423 - Stack heights

§ 7424 - Assurance of adequacy of State plans

§ 7425 - Measures to prevent economic disruption or unemployment

§ 7426 - Interstate pollution abatement

§ 7427 - Public notification

§ 7428 - State boards

§ 7429 - Solid waste combustion

§ 7430 - Emission factors

§ 7431 - Land use authority

§ 7450 to 7459 - Repealed. Pub. L. 101–549, title VI, § 601, Nov. 15, 1990, 104 Stat. 2648

§ 7470 - Congressional declaration of purpose

§ 7471 - Plan requirements

§ 7472 - Initial classifications

§ 7473 - Increments and ceilings

§ 7474 - Area redesignation

§ 7475 - Preconstruction requirements

§ 7476 - Other pollutants

§ 7477 - Enforcement

§ 7478 - Period before plan approval

§ 7479 - Definitions

§ 7491 - Visibility protection for Federal class I areas

§ 7492 - Visibility

§ 7501 - Definitions

§ 7502 - Nonattainment plan provisions in general

§ 7503 - Permit requirements

§ 7504 - Planning procedures

§ 7505 - Environmental Protection Agency grants

§ 7505a - Maintenance plans

§ 7506 - Limitations on certain Federal assistance

§ 7506a - Interstate transport commissions

§ 7507 - New motor vehicle emission standards in nonattainment areas

§ 7508 - Guidance documents

§ 7509 - Sanctions and consequences of failure to attain

§ 7509a - International border areas

§ 7511 - Classifications and attainment dates

§ 7511a - Plan submissions and requirements

§ 7511b - Federal ozone measures

§ 7511c - Control of interstate ozone air pollution

§ 7511d - Enforcement for Severe and Extreme ozone nonattainment areas for failure to attain

§ 7511e - Transitional areas

§ 7511f - NOx and VOC study

§ 7512 - Classification and attainment dates

§ 7512a - Plan submissions and requirements

§ 7513 - Classifications and attainment dates

§ 7513a - Plan provisions and schedules for plan submissions

§ 7513b - Issuance of RACM and BACM guidance

§ 7514 - Plan submission deadlines

§ 7514a - Attainment dates

§ 7515 - General savings clause

§ 7521 - Emission standards for new motor vehicles or new motor vehicle engines

§ 7522 - Prohibited acts

§ 7523 - Actions to restrain violations

§ 7524 - Civil penalties

§ 7525 - Motor vehicle and motor vehicle engine compliance testing and certification

§ 7541 - Compliance by vehicles and engines in actual use

§ 7542 - Information collection

§ 7543 - State standards

§ 7544 - State grants

§ 7545 - Regulation of fuels

§ 7546 - Renewable fuel

§ 7547 - Nonroad engines and vehicles

§ 7548 - Study of particulate emissions from motor vehicles

§ 7549 - High altitude performance adjustments

§ 7550 - Definitions

§ 7551 - Omitted

§ 7552 - Motor vehicle compliance program fees

§ 7553 - Prohibition on production of engines requiring leaded gasoline

§ 7554 - Urban bus standards

§ 7571 - Establishment of standards

§ 7572 - Enforcement of standards

§ 7573 - State standards and controls

§ 7574 - Definitions

§ 7581 - Definitions

§ 7582 - Requirements applicable to clean-fuel vehicles

§ 7583 - Standards for light-duty clean-fuel vehicles

§ 7584 - Administration and enforcement as per California standards

§ 7585 - Standards for heavy-duty clean-fuel vehicles (GVWR above 8,500 up to 26,000 lbs.)

§ 7586 - Centrally fueled fleets

§ 7587 - Vehicle conversions

§ 7588 - Federal agency fleets

§ 7589 - California pilot test program

§ 7590 - General provisions

§ 7601 - Administration

§ 7602 - Definitions

§ 7603 - Emergency powers

§ 7604 - Citizen suits

§ 7605 - Representation in litigation

§ 7606 - Federal procurement

§ 7607 - Administrative proceedings and judicial review

§ 7608 - Mandatory licensing

§ 7609 - Policy review

§ 7610 - Other authority

§ 7611 - Records and audit

§ 7612 - Economic impact analyses

§ 7613 - Repealed. Pub. L. 101–549, title VIII, § 803, Nov. 15, 1990, 104 Stat. 2689

§ 7614 - Labor standards

§ 7615 - Separability

§ 7616 - Sewage treatment grants

§ 7617 - Economic impact assessment

§ 7618 - Repealed. Pub. L. 101–549, title I, § 108(q), Nov. 15, 1990, 104 Stat. 2469

§ 7619 - Air quality monitoring

§ 7620 - Standardized air quality modeling

§ 7621 - Employment effects

§ 7622 - Employee protection

§ 7623 - Repealed. Pub. L. 96–300, § 1(c), July 2, 1980, 94 Stat. 831

§ 7624 - Cost of vapor recovery equipment

§ 7625 - Vapor recovery for small business marketers of petroleum products

§ 7625-1

§ 7625a - Statutory construction

§ 7626 - Authorization of appropriations

§ 7627 - Air pollution from Outer Continental Shelf activities

§ 7628 - Demonstration grant program for local governments

§ 7641 - Noise abatement

§ 7642 - Authorization of appropriations

§ 7651 - Findings and purposes

§ 7651a - Definitions

§ 7651b - Sulfur dioxide allowance program for existing and new units

§ 7651c - Phase I sulfur dioxide requirements

§ 7651d - Phase II sulfur dioxide requirements

§ 7651e - Allowances for States with emissions rates at or below 0.80 lbs/mmBtu

§ 7651f - Nitrogen oxides emission reduction program

§ 7651g - Permits and compliance plans

§ 7651h - Repowered sources

§ 7651i - Election for additional sources

§ 7651j - Excess emissions penalty

§ 7651k - Monitoring, reporting, and recordkeeping requirements

§ 7651l - General compliance with other provisions

§ 7651m - Enforcement

§ 7651n - Clean coal technology regulatory incentives

§ 7651o - Contingency guarantee, auctions, reserve

§ 7661 - Definitions

§ 7661a - Permit programs

§ 7661b - Permit applications

§ 7661c - Permit requirements and conditions

§ 7661d - Notification to Administrator and contiguous States

§ 7661e - Other authorities

§ 7661f - Small business stationary source technical and environmental compliance assistance program

§ 7671 - Definitions

§ 7671a - Listing of class I and class II substances

§ 7671b - Monitoring and reporting requirements

§ 7671c - Phase-out of production and consumption of class I substances

§ 7671d - Phase-out of production and consumption of class II substances

§ 7671e - Accelerated schedule

§ 7671f - Exchange authority

§ 7671g - National recycling and emission reduction program

§ 7671h - Servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners

§ 7671i - Nonessential products containing chlorofluorocarbons

§ 7671j - Labeling

§ 7671k - Safe alternatives policy

§ 7671l - Federal procurement

§ 7671m - Relationship to other laws

§ 7671n - Authority of Administrator

§ 7671o - Transfers among Parties to Montreal Protocol

§ 7671p - International cooperation

§ 7671q - Miscellaneous provisions

Title 40 published on 09-Jun-2018 05:24

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 40 CFR Part 1065 after this date.

  • 2017-06-30; vol. 82 # 125 - Friday, June 30, 2017
    1. 82 FR 29762 - Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles—Phase 2
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
      40 CFR Parts 9, 22, 85, 86, 600, 1033, 1036, 1037, 1039, 1042, 1043, 1065, 1066, and 1068