Iowa Admin. Code r. 661-502.8 - Use of criminal convictions in eligibility determinations and initial licensing decisions

Current through Register Vol. 44, No. 6, September 22, 2021

(1) License application. Unless an applicant for licensure petitions the board for an eligibility determination, the applicant's convictions will be reviewed when the board receives a completed license application.
a. Full disclosure required. An applicant must disclose all convictions on a license application. Failure to disclose all convictions is grounds for license denial or disciplinary action following license issuance.
b. Documentation and personal statement. An applicant with one or more convictions must submit the complete criminal record for each conviction and a personal statement regarding whether each conviction directly relates to the practice of the profession in order for the license application to be considered complete.
c. Rehabilitation. An applicant must, as part of the license application, submit all evidence of rehabilitation that the applicant wishes to be considered by the board. The board may deny a license if the applicant has a disqualifying offense, unless the applicant demonstrates by clear and convincing evidence that the applicant is rehabilitated pursuant to Iowa Code section 272C.15. An applicant with one or more disqualifying offenses who has been found rehabilitated must still satisfy all other requirements for licensure.
d. Nonrefundable fees. Any application fees will not be refunded if the license is denied.
(2) Eligibility determination. An individual who has not yet submitted a completed license application may petition the board for an eligibility determination. An individual with criminal convictions is not required to petition the board for an eligibility determination before applying for a license. To petition the board for an eligibility determination, a petitioner must submit all of the following:
a. A completed eligibility determination form, which is available on the board's website;
b. The complete criminal record for each of the petitioner's convictions;
c. A personal statement regarding whether each conviction directly relates to the practice of the profession and why the board should find the petitioner rehabilitated;
d. All evidence of rehabilitation that the petitioner wants the board to consider; and
e. Payment of a nonrefundable fee in the amount of $25.
(3) Appeal. A petitioner found ineligible or an applicant denied a license because of a disqualifying offense may appeal the decision in the manner and time frame set forth in the board's written decision. A timely appeal will initiate a nondisciplinary contested case proceeding. The department's rules governing contested case proceedings apply unless otherwise specified in this rule. If the petitioner or applicant fails to file a timely appeal, the board's written decision will become a final order.
a. Presiding officer. The presiding officer will be the board. However, any party to an appeal of a license denial or ineligibility determination may file a written request, in accordance with rule 661-10.306 (17A), requesting that the presiding officer be an administrative law judge. Additionally, the board may, on its own motion, request that an administrative law judge be assigned to act as presiding officer. An administrative law judge assigned to act as presiding officer in a nondisciplinary contested case proceeding under this rule must possess a Juris Doctor degree. When an administrative law judge serves as the presiding officer, the decision rendered will be a proposed decision.
b. Burden. The office of the attorney general shall represent the board's initial ineligibility determination or license denial and shall have the burden of proof to establish that the petitioner's or applicant's convictions include at least one disqualifying offense. If the office of the attorney general satisfies this burden by a preponderance of the evidence, the burden of proof shall shift to the petitioner or applicant to establish rehabilitation by clear and convincing evidence.
c. Judicial review. A petitioner or applicant must appeal an ineligibility determination or a license denial in order to exhaust administrative remedies. A petitioner or applicant may only seek judicial review of an ineligibility determination or license denial after the issuance of a final order following a contested case proceeding. Judicial review of the final order following a contested case proceeding shall be in accordance with Iowa Code chapter 17A.
(4) Future petitions or applications. If a final order determines a petitioner is ineligible, the petitioner may not submit a subsequent petition for eligibility determination or a license application prior to the date specified in the final order. If a final order denies a license application, the applicant may not submit a subsequent license application or a petition for eligibility determination prior to the date specified in the final order.

Notes

Iowa Admin. Code r. 661-502.8
Adopted by IAB June 30, 2021/Volume XLIII, Number 27, effective 8/4/2021

The following state regulations pages link to this page.



State regulations are updated quarterly; we currently have two versions available. Below is a comparison between our most recent version and the prior quarterly release. More comparison features will be added as we have more versions to compare.