Chapter 232 - STANDARD CRITERIA FOR MAINE SECONDARY VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS

  1. Appendix 071-232-A - ACCREDITATION, SCHOOL APPROVAL AND PROGRAM REVIEW
  2. Appendix 071-232-B
  3. Appendix 071-232-C
  4. Appendix 071-232-D
  5. Appendix 071-232-E
  6. Appendix 071-232-F - STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICES IN APPROVED VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS
  7. Appendix 071-232-G - PRE-VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
  8. Appendix 071-232-H - GUIDELINES FOR THE SCREENING OF STUDENTS INTO SECONDARY SCHOOL VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS
  9. Appendix 071-232-I - STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
  10. Appendix 071-232-J - VOCATIONAL ASSESSMENT

Current through 2022-14, April 6, 2022

Summary: This Chapter adopts Standard Criteria for Maine Secondary Vocational Programs (The text of this Chapter appears in the attached booklet). These rules detail minimum standards which must be adhered to by educational agencies in planning, implementing and evaluating vocational courses and programs. These standards will be used in conjunction with the Basic Program Approval process provided for in Chapters 125 and 127 and will also be used in course and program review and accreditation procedures.

These rules provide detailed guidelines and procedures to be used by local administrative units when planning, implementing and assessing local programs. Individual programs, whether vocationally subsidized or subsidized through general purpose aid identify the following requirements: scope, sequence, curriculum content, time, third party requirements, class size, facilities equipment and teaching materials, student organizations, safety, teacher certification, advisory committees, technical and assistance provided by the Department of Education. A comprehensive appendix provides guidelines for accreditation, -school approval, program review, special projects, sex equity, Methods of Administration (MOA), student screening and student services, student organizations and vocational assessments.

FOREWORD

These vocational education program standards set forth the Department of Education, requirements for Maine's secondary vocational education courses of study. These standards were developed for department personnel, school administrators and instructors, and others who are responsible for Instructional and program management.

The underlying intent of these standards is to enhance secondary educational opportunities for all Maine's students by affording them access to quality vocational programs thus giving them a competitive edge as they prepare for their Life and career choices.

Maine's future economic vitality ties in its greatest natural resource Its people. Secondary vocational education is very much an integral part of that vitality.

Eve M. Bither

Commissioner

Maine Department of Educational and

Cultural Services

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

The ever flexing and changing needs of Maine's business and industrial community require Maine's educational system, as a whole, to realign itself as necessary to meet these emerging needs. The Department of Education, under the authority of the Maine State Board of Education, presents these standards for program approval, revision, and evaluation as keystones from which to maintain a viable and effective adult and secondary vocational education network throughout the State of Maine.

PREFACE

This document sets forth standards and procedures which govern vocational instruction at the secondary level in the State of Maine. These standards have been developed pursuant to the intent and Legal requirements set forth in Maine's revised statutes, Title 20-A, governing education and other state and federal regulations; e.g., P.L. 98-524 Carl Perkins Vocational Education Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Chapter 125 Regulations Governing Basic School Approval, and Chapter 127 Instruction Requirements and Graduation Standards of the Education Reform Act.

These standards must be adhered to by educational agencies in planning, implementing and evaluating vocational courses and programs. These standards mitt be used in conjunction with the Basic Program Approval process provided for in Chapters 125 and 127, and they also mitt be used in course and program review and accreditation procedures.

These standards mitt be reviewed annually by the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education and modified appropriately to reflect necessary adjustments to deliver relevant occupational training in )faint's educational institutions.

This document sets forth program criteria. Following specific program listings is an appendix with general information and applicable requirements. The provisions of the appendix are part of the rules and are legally binding except where stated to be advisory or informational.

For further Information or assistance, contact the Department of Education, Director of the Division of Secondary Vocational Education, 23 State House Station, Augusta, Maine 04333.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

On behalf of the Department of Education, the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education wishes to recognize the following individuals for their contributions in serving as members of the Steering Committee for the preparation of this document:

Vocational Administration:

Frank Lee (Instructional Support Group)

Consultant, Trade & Industrial Programs

Bureau of Vocational Education, DE

Richard Duntley, Director

Portland Regional Vocational Center

Linwood Turcotte, Director

Skowhegan Regional Vocational Center

Elwood Littlefield, Director

Vocational Region Four

Consumer and Home Economics:

Donna Muto, Department Head

Consumer and Home Economics Education

Mount Ararat School

Business Education:

Mike Fortunato, Department Head

Business Education

Cony High School

Health Occupations:

Reneva Smith, Coordinator

Secondary Health Occupations Education

Vocational Region Two

Home Economics Related Occupational Programs:

Natalie Mcfalls, Instructor

Mount Desert Island High School

Marketing:

David Berry. Instructor

Vocational Region Four

Cooperative Education:

Bruce Elder, Coordinator

Cooperative Education

Windham High School

Technology/Industrial Arts:

Richard Bray, Department Read

Industrial Arts Education

Oak Hill High School

John Kraljic, Instructor

Industrial Arts Education

Garland Street Middle School, Bangor

Neale Buck, Director

Presque Isle Regional Vocational Center

Agriculture:

Robert Rhodes, Director

Technical Division

University of Maine, Orono

Frank McElwain, President

Vocational Agriculture Teacher

Limestone High School

Handicapped:

Gunnel White, Cluster Coordinator

General Trades Programs

Portland Regional Vocational Center

Trade & Industrial:

Michael Kane, Counselor

Westbrook Regional Vocational Center

Vocational Guidance:

Chuck Hodge

Vocational Guidance/Student Services

Dexter Regional Vocational Center

State Principals Association:

Richard Sykes, Principal

Lewiston High School

State Superintendents' Association:

Dale Doughty, Superintendent S.A.D. #9

Mt. Blue High School

Project Chair:

Joan W. Jones, Consultant

Bureau of Adult & Secondary Vocational Education

Project Consulting Editor:

Richard Getchell, Associate Director Maine Principals' Association

Division of Secondary Vocational Education:

Donald Marchildon, Director

We also wish to give special recognition to Richard Duntley, Director of Portland Regional Vocational Center, and Fred St. Cyr, Director of Sanford Regional Vocational Center, for their efforts in the final editing of this document.

PHILOSOPHY

The State Board of Education believes vocational education is an integral component of the comprehensive secondary school and should be accessible to sit students. It also believes that the acquisition of academic skills is fundamental in the development of sound vocational skills. Interaction with community, business, and Industrial advisory groups is essential to assure the development of quality, comprehensive vocational programs to meet the needs of students with diverse interests, skills, and abilities. The opportunity for enrollment in vocational education should be extended to all individuals including those who have completed or discontinued their format education.

MISSION

The mission of Secondary Vocational Education in Maine is to provide programs and services for youth and adults that assure the acquisition of appropriate employment-related skills which, in turn, provide relevance to academic subject matter.

GOALS

1. To meet society's need for a skilled labor force,
2. To increase educational and career options available to each student,
3. To provide a competency-based method of instruction to assure the acquisition of employment-related skills and knowledge identified by practitioners,
4. To apply the fundamentals of written and, verbal communication, computational proficiency, and other rotated academic skills as integral parts of occupational instruction,
5. To provide Instruction which encourages and supports students in acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes relative to career decision making, life employment, and further educational training.
6. To ensure equal opportunity for mates and females in vocational duration programs, especially in programs nontraditional for their sex.

DEFINITIONS

Approval - Approval for programs and services to be operated by the school administrative units may be granted by the Division of Secondary Vocational Education, subject to review and approval by the Commissioner. Programs that are approved are eligible for subsidy.

Associate Commissioner - The designated head of the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education whose function is the administration of adult and secondary vocational education programs.

Basic Skills - Infusion of instruction in the basic subjects within the vocational curriculum.

Bureau - The Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education within the Department of Education (DE) designated to administer and supervise the adult and secondary vocational education delivery systems.

Cart Perkins Vocational Education Act - P.L. 98-524 is the federal Law that sets forth all the requirements for qualification for and expenditures of federal funds for vocational education.

Center Cooperative Agreement - A cooperative agreement may be developed by the superintendents' advisory committee which shall delineate the duties and powers of the advisory committee and devise a formula for sharing costs. The agreement is subject to ratification by all of the school boards of the participating administrative units.

Center Director - The director shall serve as chief administrative officer of the center and its satellites and have all the authority and obligations of a secondary school principal in the school administrative unit operating the center.

CIP - Federal Classification of instructional Programs promulgated by the U.S. Office of Education. This code replaces the Dictionary of Occupations Titles coding promulgated by the U.S. Department of Labor.

Cluster Curriculum - Provides core skills and knowledges that cut across a group of closely related occupational areas.

Commissioner - The designated head of the Department of Education (DE) and executive officer of the State Board of Education.

Competency-Based Curriculum - A curriculum designed to focus on the student's ability to demonstrate understanding of concepts and principles and to perform the tasks and operations specified in Learning objectives.

Competency-Based Education - The concept that acquisition of pre-determined skills and knowledge rather than time is the determiner of achievement in a course or program.

Cooperative Agreement - A collaborative effort among special education, vocational rehabilitation, and vocational education for the delivery of appropriate vocational services to special populations.

Cooperative Board - The administrative body governing the operation of a vocational region made up of representatives of those school administrative units sending students to the vocational region in accordance with Title 20A, Section 8453 of the Maine Revised Statutes, Title 20-A.

Core Competencies - Minimum knowledge and skills needed for employment in a specific occupation.

Curriculum - The series of courses designed to cover the instruction in a designated area of study: may also be considered to be the whole body of courses or units of instruction offered in an educational institution.

Division of Secondary vocational Education - The division of the Bureau whose function is the administration and supervision of secondary vocational education.

Federal Funds - Funds made available to the State under provisions of P.L. 98-524 (Carl Perkins Act).

General Purpose Aid Programs - Consumer and home economics, business, technology education, and general agriculture programs which are under the aegis of the Division of Secondary Vocational Education but are administered by school administrative units and are subsidized the same as general education programs.

IVEP - individual Vocational Education Plan

Occupational Analysis - A format study of a recognizable occupation.

Program Advisory Committee - Each vocational program has a program advisory committee composed of active practitioners from the occupations, employers and employees, community representatives and past and present student representatives.

Program Consultants - The Division of Secondary Vocational Education has a staff of program consultants which serve to assist Centers and Regions in the development, review and evaluation of vocational programs; the consultants also provide technical assistance and Leadership to general purpose aid programs in consumer and home economics, business, technology education, and general agriculture programs.

Recognized Occupation - An occupation that is listed in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles or in the Standard Industrial Classification; or in the case of a new or unique occupation, one that is clearly defined and accepted by the Commissioner of Education.

Region Director - The chief administrative officer of a vocational region with responsibilities to serve as secretary and treasurer to the cooperative board; to nominate teachers and perform other duties similar to those of a superintendent if so designated by the cooperative board.

Regional Cooperative Agreement - An agreement delineating that vocational education shall be administered in its region. This agreement is to be maintained in accordance with Section 8457-2 of the Maine Revised Statutes, Title 20-A.

SAU's - School administrative units - local education agencies which are responsible for education programs in their respective communities.

Secondary Vocational Education - All the programs which establish the system for the delivery of vocational education by Vocational Centers and Regions, working within the regulations, procedures, and guidelines established by State and Federal taws and State Board policies. Additionally, those vocational programs of consumer and home economics, technology education (industrial arts), agriculture, and business education housed within comprehensive high schools fall within the scope and authority of vocational education.

State Board - The State Board of Education which sets the State education policies and overseas the operation of the education institutions of the State as empowered in Title 20-A, of the MRSA, subsection 405, Powers and Duties.

State Funds - Funds appropriated by the State Legislature or allotted by the State Board to be used for programs of vocational education meeting standards established by the State Board.

State Plan - A contract between the State Board of Education and the U. S. Office of education which is required by taw for the operation of vocational education programs using federal funds. ( P.L. 98-524, Cart D. Perkins Vocational Education Act)

Vocational Center - An administrative unit designated to provide vocational education to secondary school students of a single school administrative unit and its affiliated school administrative units.

Vocational Center Advisory Committee - The committee which consists of the superintendent or the superintendent's representative and one member from each school board In the participating affiliated school administrative units that is responsible for coordinating vocational education for that Center.

Vocational Education - Education-to create or improve job related knowledge and skills which Is part of a secondary school curriculum.

Vocational Program - A vocational offering which meets the standard criteria for such a program.

Vocational Region - An administrative unit designated to provide vocational education to secondary school students within a geographic area established in accordance with Section 8451 of the Maine Revised Statutes. It is governed by a Cooperative Board in accordance with section 8452.

Vocational Satellite Program - A vocational program which is administered by a school administrative unit affiliated with a Center, under the direction of the Center Director, and which is located at a site away from the Vocational Center.

Procedure For Initial Approval of

Secondary Vocational Education Programs

1. The school administrative unit shall develop a proposal which adheres to the guidelines set forth in this chapter. No program may be offered before it is approved by the Commissioner of the Department of Education.
2. The proposal must be submitted to the Associate Commissioner of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education for review. The Associate Commissioner shall recommend approval, approval with conditions, or disapproval to the Commissioner. The Commissioner's decision on the proposal shall be final.
3. The school administrative unit or vocational region may appeal an adverse decision to Superior Court within 30 days from the receipt of the decision in the manner set forth in 5 MRSA section11001 et seq.
4. The duration of the program approval shall be coordinated with the school's 5-year cycle of basic school approval.
5. This section shall only apply to programs offered on or after the effective date of this chapter.

GUIDELINES AND FORMAT FOR PREPARING AND SUBMITTING A PROGRAM PROPOSAL

Each item identifies information required when requesting approval to offer an occupational course using vocational education funds.

I. NAME OF LOCAL EDUCATION AGENCY SUBMITTING PROPOSAL
A. Title of proposed program/course
B. CIP Number
II. JUSTIFICATION FOR OFFERING THE COURSE/PROGRAM
A. Employment opportunities
1. Local survey (interpret and summarize the results)
2. Federal/State statistics (conclusions drawn)
B. Student needs
1. Occupational preference survey (interpret and-summarize the results)
2. Students to be served
III. ORGANIZATION OF COURSE/PROGRAM
A. General Requirements
1. Application must indicate compliance with this document and the following

Public Laws and DE regulations as stated In

a.P.L. 95-524 (Cart Perkins Vocational Education Act)
b. Title 20-A MRSA and DE implementing rules Chapter 125 and 127 of the Education Reform Act
c. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Also, vocational education program guidelines for eliminating discrimination and dental of services on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex and handicap (1979) (Appendix D and Appendix(E)
d.P.L. 94-142 (Special Education)
e. Other subsequent or applicable acts
2. Applications which utilize field-based training must be in compliance with all state and Federal Labor laws and all applicable civil rights and affirmative action legislation affecting schools and employers. References: "Guidelines for Job Training Programs," Maine Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Standards; "Jobs and Youth: # Guide to Laws, Regulations, and Resources in Maine," Dept. of Manpower Affairs; and "Field Placements" in Appendix A of this publication
3. Proposals must reflect compliance with all applicable safety laws and regulations.
4. Facilities must be in accordance with State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules
B. Length of course - number of weeks/number of hours/periods per week; total number of hours or core competencies equivalent
C. Grade placement of enrollees
D. Number to be served
E. Description of curriculum content including local minimum core competencies and State curriculum guidelines
F. Student organizations to be offered
IV. PROGRAM PLANNING
A. Who was involved"
B. Local endorsements including approval dates
1. School Board(s) or Cooperative Board
2. Center Advisory Committee
3. Program Advisory Committee
4. Other
V. FACILITIES
A. Description of facilities needed or to be used
B. Compliance with School Building Construction Rules
C. Accessibility
VI. EQUIPMENT
A. List major equipment
1. to be purchased
2. to be utilized (source)
VII. TOTAL EQUIPMENT AND OPERATING COSTS
A. Equipment
B. Estimate total annual operating cost
1. Salaries and fringe benefits
2. Supplies
3. Maintenance
4. Equipment rental
5. Texts and instructional materials
6. Staff development and training
7. other
VIII. QUALIFICATIONS NEEDED BY THE TEACHER
A. Licensing and Certification requirements
1. Application must indicate the Licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructors of the proposed program as outlined in program approval standards in this publication.
IX. CRITERIA TO BE USED FOR THE SELECTION OF ENROLLEES

(See the Guidelines for Screening in Appendix 1)

X. PROGRAM ADVISORY COMMITTEE
A. List names and organizations represented
B. List dates of meetings and summarize results
C. Describe how the Advisory Committee wilt be used in the future
XI. PROCEDURES FOR PROGRAM EVALUATION
XII. SUBMISSION OF PROGRAM PROPOSALS
A. The proposal shall be submitted to the Associate Commissioner of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education for review. The Associate Commissioner shall recommend approval, approval with conditions, or disapproval to the Commissioner. The Commissioner's decision on the proposal for changes shall be final.
B. The school administrative unit or vocational region may appeal an adverse decision to Superior Court within 30 days from receipt of the decision in the manner set forth in 5 MRSA, Section11001 et seg.

PROCEDURE FOR MAKING SUBSTANTIVE CHANGE IN AN EXISTING

SECONDARY VOCATIONAL PROGRAM

1. The school administrative unit or vocational region shall develop a proposal which identifies changes to be made in the program as initially approved. The proposal shall include justification for the changes.
2. The proposal shall be submitted to the Associate Commissioner of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education for review. The Associate Commissioner shall recommend approval, approval with conditions, or disapproval to the Commissioner. The Commissioner's decision on the proposal for changes shall be final.
3. The school administrative unit or vocational region may appeal an adverse decision to Superior Court within 30 days from receipt of the decision in the manner set forth in 5 MRSA section11001 et seq.

NON-RENEWAL OR REVOCATION OF PROGRAM APPROVAL

1. If the Commissioner determines, after due notice and opportunity for hearing, that a program is not in compliance with the provisions of this chapter, the Commissioner may withhold state subsidy from the school administrative unit or the school administrative units belonging to a vocational region. The withholding shall continue as long as necessary to achieve compliance.
2. If compliance cannot be obtained by withholding subsidy payment, or if with-holding would be an inappropriate remedy, the Commissioner may refer the matter to the Attorney General for action.
3. Nothing in this section precludes the Commissioner from employing other penalties authorized in Title 20-A of the MRSA or required by Federal law.

VOCATIONAL SUBSIDIZED PROGRAMS

Programs in this section of the document include those funded under vocational education subsidy. They focus on competency development for trade specific or rotated employment and provide a foundation for continued education and training.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR THE APPROVAL OF AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS

I. SCOPE
A. Agricultural education should provide for a comprehensive program of instruction which is continuous, sequential, and specific. Vocational agricultural programs must reflect the needs of the emerging agricultural industry and represent a balanced combination of the traditional and newly discovered advancements in science and technology. It must present itself as a dynamic and changing educational delivery system which is cognizant of progress in the agricultural industry. Objectives should be developed with an emphasis on agribusiness/agriscience skills. The development of these skills should include both traditional and innovative approaches to teaching, including experiential activities, basic, career, and life skill development, and other applied techniques. Such programs should take into consideration the various abilities, interests, skills, and backgrounds of students Interested in pursuing a career in agriculture/agribusiness and should reflect current science and technology findings. The major program objectives for agricultural education are as follows:
1. to develop competencies needed to engage in agricultural production occupations
2. to develop competencies needed to engage in agricultural business-related occupations
3. to develop an awareness of career opportunities for males and females in agriculture/agribusiness and the preparation needed for entry and progression in those occupations
4. to encourage participation in short-term cultural enrichment courses which provide knowledge and insight into agricultural education as it impacts upon the world's social and economic needs
5. to provide students with a broad-based foundation of knowledge and skills which enable students to enter postsecondary education
6. to provide students an opportunity to develop an understanding of, and appreciation for, the scientific principles and technology of agriculture and to encourage and assist them in the application of this knowledge
II. SEQUENCE
A. Vocational agricultural programs at the secondary Level must be designed in accordance with the standards of the occupation they represent, and be of sufficient length in time to assure the acquisition of entry-level skills for their participants.

Programs shall be developed and maintained in response to employment opportunities, and utilize a current field validated occupational analysis as its curriculum design base. An individual student's course of study may be flexible but must be directed to previously identified career objectives in a manner that leads to progressive skill and knowledge development and toward individual career objectives.

Vocational agricultural programs shall include both classroom and laboratory experiences. Field experiences may be utilized as all, or part of, the laboratory requirement.

B. Supervised Occupational Experience Program

Occupational experience programs should be continuous and of such nature and duration as to provide the experience necessary to meet the student's occupational objectives. Supervised occupational experience is an integral part of the vocational agriculture program that allows students to become actively involved in tasks performed by people in agricultural occupations.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Rules states that each school must have a written curriculum. The curriculum must reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Content
1. Each program offered in agricultural education may reflect the following subject areas:
a. Agricultural science and technology
b. Horticulture
c. Forestry and Conservation
d. Agricultural Resources
e. Agricultural Mechanics
f. Environmental Science
g. Agribusiness (marketing, supplies, products, etc.)
h. Production Agriculture
i. Animal Sciences
j. Landscaping
k. other agricultural areas as identified by the school and community
B. Time Requirements

Agriculture and natural resources vocational education programs shall provide for a minimum of 350 hours of instruction per school year. Programs or career objectives for less than 350 hours per school year may be approved upon application and Justification to the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education. Actual hours of instruction for each student will be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic core competencies as identified in the approved competency-based curriculum. ALL third party time and task requirements will be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.

C. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all applicable State and Federal regulations including facility and personnel licensing requirements.

IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education's School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student Leadership development activities. The designated student organization for agriculture and natural resources education is (FFA) Future Farmers of America.

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Progress must identify Licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. individual instructors must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject areas to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact their Local superintendent's office or the support team for information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR ALLIED HEALTH OCCUPATIONS

I. SCOPE

Health occupations render supportive services to the health professions - e.g. nursing, medical, and dental. Employment in this discipline is available in a wide variety of settings, including health care facilities, community health agencies, professional offices and clinics.

Programs in allied health occupations shall be of sufficient duration to provide students with the knowledge and skills required at the job-entry Level.

II. SEQUENCE

Courses shall be scheduled progressively according to their complexity. Entrance into advanced or specialized courses shall require satisfactory completion of basic or "core" courses offered earlier in the program.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Cluster Curriculum -includes an integrated foundation of knowledge and skills essential to allied health occupations as wall as exposure to a variety of career options in the allied health field.

The cluster curriculum way lead to the specialty curricula based upon the student's career objective or to an integrated approach utilizing the core curriculum taught in conjunction with a specialty area.

B. Specialty Curricula - includes training which provides knowledge and skills required of entry level workers in a specified health occupation. Examples may be found in the curriculum guide available from the Bureau of Adult and secondary Vocational Education.
C. Content
1. Philosophy and Objectives

Each program shall be developed around a statement of philosophy which Is consistent with the philosophy of the vocational center or region.

2. Conceptual Framework

The conceptual framework for the curriculum shall reflect the philosophy of the educational program and shall be relevant to the objectives of the program.

3. Entry-Level Competencies

Entry-level competencies shall be in place for each health occupations course and shall reflect the philosophy and objectives of the educational program.

4. Selection of Learning Experiences

Learning experiences and methods of instruction shall be selected by the program instructors to most effectively accomplish the stated competencies for each program.

Each course shall include planned, supervised clinical experience as a required part of the educational program. This experience shall be supervised by a qualified clinical instructor to ensure that the experiences are educationally oriented and appropriate to meet student objectives. State and Federal certification requirements shall be met.

5. Correlated Supervised Clinical Practice
a. Correlated supervised clinical practice shall be an integral component of the allied health occupations program.
b. Only accredited/licensed/certified health care agencies, institutions or private practice settings, shall be selected for clinical sites to be utilized by the program.
c. There shall be a written contractual agreement renewed annually between the school and each cooperating clinical facility utilized by the program.
d. All students and instructors participating in the clinical experience phase of the health occupations program shall be insured for malpractice liability.
e. Duration of the clinical experience shall be determined by the nature and complexity of the specialized skills to be attained and shall be in accordance with all applicable State/Federal regulations including those promulgated by the Department of Labor, the State Board of Nursing, the Department of Human Services, and the Department of Education.
f. The SAU, in cooperation with clinical facilities, will develop guidelines for student and instructor attire.
g. Students and instructors must meet the health requirements of cooperating clinical agencies.
6. Instructional Materials and Resources

Instructional materials and resources shall be accurate in content and reflect current concepts and practices of the health care industry; the quantity shall be sufficient to meet curriculum and student needs; they shall be updated periodically.

D. Organization and Management

The curriculum shall be organized to provide sit students with the necessary knowledge, skills and behaviors required for entry level employment in the selected field within the legally defined scope of practice.

The program will ensure that all students are provided with equal learning and placement opportunities.

E. Scheduling and Minimum Time Requirements
1. Core Curriculum

A minimum of 350 hours shall be provided for each year of an allied health occupations program encompassing the core curriculum and including a specialty curricula on a career objective basis. Actual hours of instruction for each student will be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic core competencies as identified in the approved competency-based curriculum. All thirdparty time and task requirements wilt be adhered to as per their statutes and regulations.

2. Specialty Curricula shall be scheduled for a minimum of 150 hours.
3. Other

Short-term courses may be offered to meet specified needs of students and/or the industry. They must be justifiable through the Local application section and meet all state and federal guidelines and requirements.

F. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all applicable state and federal regulations including facility and personnel Licensing requirements.

IV. CLASS SIZE

Teacher/student ratios

A. Classroom - 1 to 25
B. Laboratory - 1 to 16
C. Clinical - 1 to 8 recommended, 1 to 10 maximum allowable
V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. The designated student organization for allied health occupations is Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact their local support system for information concerning certification.

Additionally, health occupations teachers must meet State Board of Nursing regulations for teaching and supervising unlicensed nursing personnel.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance wilt be provided by the Health Occupations Education Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION

(Vocationally Funded)

I. SCOPE

Business education is a broad comprehensive discipline. The instructional program encompasses primarily:

(1) knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed by all citizens to manage effectively their personal business needs; (2) understanding of the American business and economic system; and (3) vocational knowledge and skills needed for entry-level employment and advancement in business careers.

The responsibility of vocational business education programs is to educate students for meaningful employment in business and office occupations as well as for post-secondary studies.

The major objectives of business education are:

A. To develop professional attitudes and skills for gainful and meaningful employment, including unique and emerging occupations.
B. To provide students with meaningful experiences for acquiring the knowledge necessary to succeed in business and office occupations.
C. To offer courses that serve as the basis for post-secondary studies.
II. SEQUENCE

The vocational business education program of study wilt be comprehensive and shall include one or more of the prescribed occupations which are:

Executive/Administrative Assistant Office Occupations Business Administration

Courses of study shall include:

A. Executive/Administrative Assistant

Grade 11

Advanced Typewriting Applications

Accounting I

Shorthand I

Grade 12

Advanced Shorthand or Machine Transcription

Office systems and Procedures

Computer Applications

B. Office Occupations

Grade 11

Advanced Typewriting Applications

Office Technology

Accounting I

Grade 12

Automated Accounting

Office Systems and Procedures

Computer Applications

C. Business Administration

Grade 11

Accounting I

Management/Economics

Computer Applications

Grade 12

Automated Accounting

Low

Business Administration Techniques and Practices

Pre-requisites for vocational business programs:

Keyboarding

Computer Proficiency

Applications for unique programs wilt be considered by the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential, and specific instruction.

A. Scheduling Requirements
1. Program offerings must be in block format (consecutive periods).
B. Time Requirements

Business vocational education programs shall provide for a minimum of 350 hours of instruction per school year. Programs or career objectives for less than 350 hours per school year may be approved upon application and justification to the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education. Actual hours of instruction for each student will be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic core competencies as identified in the approved competency-based curriculum. All third party time and task requirements will be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.

C. Third Party Requirements
1. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable state/federal regulations including facility/personnel licensing requirements.
IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending an the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approve(.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used in business and industry. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance end repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office Of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocations( education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. Designated student organization for business education Is Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must Identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. 'Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of business, industry, and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Business Education Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR VOCATIONAL CHILD CARE PROGRAMS

I. SCOPE

This instructional program prepares individuals for occupations in child care and guidance, foster care/family day care, and teacher assistance. (When employed in these areas, the individual will be under the supervision of professional personnel.) It includes instruction in child growth and development; nutrition; program planning and management; safety and behavior guidance; recreational and play activities; child abuse and neglect; special needs children; interpersonal relationships; laws, regulations, and policies relating to child care services; maintenance of children's environments; preparation for employment, and career and professional development.

II. SEQUENCE

Vocational child care programs shall be offered for the Length of time necessary to provide trainees with the necessary skills and knowledge required at the job entry level. Supervised laboratory experience shall be an integral part of the course or program. These courses may be offered to in-school youth or out-of-school youth and adults and are designed to prepare individuals for employment.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Content

Vocational child care programs shall be designed in accordance with the standards of the occupation in order that an individual may enter and advance within the occupation. The State Curriculum Guide for Vocational Child Care is available from the Consultant for Vocational Child Care programs.

Content for all programs shall be derived from a validated occupational analysis.

Curriculum content shall be revised periodically with input from the program's advisory committee to assure that the program is updated to meet changing labor market, technology, and worker requirements.

B. Scheduling and Minimum Time Requirements

Courses may be scheduled to meet the needs of individual programs, but 60% of the time must include lab or lab-related experiences and total course time must be at total 350 hours yearly. Actual hours of instruction for each student will be determined by the individuals ability to meet basic core competencies as Identified In the approved competency-based curriculum. All third party time and task requirements will be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.

Two-year programs are highly recommended to provide additional opportunities for advanced laboratory work and community-based work experiences, development of more advanced management skills and entrepreneurship training.

C. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all applicable state/federal regulations including facility/personnel licensing requirements.

D. Vocational child core programs-shall, in all cases, meet the minimum standards for licensed family day care as promulgated by the Department of Human Services.
IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program wilt be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

The maximum number of pre-schoolers to be accepted in the laboratory nursery school shall not exceed sixteen (16) per session and in no case shall exceed two (2) pre-schoolers to each vocational student.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061. with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

In addition, the minimum standards for licensed day care facilities must be met.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may very from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. The designated student organizations for child care programs education is Future Homemakers of America/Home Economics Related Occupations (FHA/HERO) and Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR INSTRUCTORS, VOCATIONAL STUDENTS AND PRESCHOOL CHILDREN
A. A medical form must be filed prior to employment/enrollment in a vocational child care program and signed by a licensed physician or designee certifying that the person is free from communicable and contagious diseases. This certificate must include results of a tuberculosis test acceptable to the Division of Disease Control, Bureau of Health.
B. Pre-schoolers shall be required to have an updated immunization record, appropriate to their age group, prior to acceptance into the nursery school.
X. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

In addition, teachers must meet any requirements imposed by the Department of Human Services relative to the supervision of young children.

XI. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XII. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Child Care Program Education Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR COMPUTER INFORMATION PROCESSING

I. SCOPE

Advances in computer technology have brought about significant changes in how business and industry operate in today's world. The volume of information, as well as speed of access to that information, necessitates a need to train a wide range of students to understand, analyze, solve, and make decisions concerning business activities.

The responsibility of the Computer Information Processing program will be to educate students for meaningful employment in computer-related occupations as well as for post-secondary studies.

The major objectives are:

A. To develop attitudes, skills and work ethics for gainful and meaningful employment
B. To provide students with meaningful experiences for acquiring the knowledge necessary to succeed in a computer-related field
C. To offer a program that serves as the basis for post-secondary studies
II. SEQUENCE

The program of study wilt provide for advanced, experience utilizing computer equipment and will also contain cognitive and effective domain objectives to provide entry-level skills for computer-related occupations. Course of study will include the following categories but need not be limited to them.

A. Computer Concepts and Operations
B. Date Entry Applications
C. Word Processing Applications
D. Database Applications
E. Spreadsheet Applications
F. Computer Graphics Applications
G. Computer Programming
III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction. Computer information Processing will be a course of study that provides students the opportunity to acquire concepts, attitudes, and entry-level skills essential for working in computer-related occupations. It will provide the students an opportunity to simulate the manner in which computers are used in problem solving and decision making as they rotate to business functions and activities. The program will focus on the knowledge required to accomplish computer information processing tasks.

A. Time Requirements

Computer information processing vocational education programs shall provide for a minimum of 350 hours of instruction per school year. Programs or career objectives for less than 350 hours per school year may be approved upon application and justification to the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education. Actual hours of instruction for each student will be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic core competencies as identified in the approved competency-based curriculum. ALL third party time and task requirements wilt be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.

IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number, of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs way vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. Designated student organization for computer information processing is future Business Leaders of America (FBLA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify Licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of business, industry, and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Computer Information Processing Education Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

I. SCOPE

Cooperative vocational education programs may provide cooperative job and occupational training in whatever field there is an occupational need that:

A. Is in accordance with a student's identified career objective.
B. Provides progressive skill development in accordance with the student's abilities.
C. Requires a related instruction component which can be delivered through or in conjunction with the program's related instruction activities.
II. SEQUENCE

Cooperative education programs may be offered for a one year or a two year period as separate programs or in conjunction with existing approved school based vocational programs as capstone activities. All programs shall make provisions for both job training and supporting related instruction. They shall operate with both components for all students enrolled.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific Instruction.

A. Training Plan

A detailed training plan shall be cooperatively developed by the coordinator and the training site sponsor. The training plan shall identify:

1. Progressive skills to be learned or applied on the job.
2. Applicable related knowledge for that job.
3. The equipment or machines to be utilized in the job training.
4. The health and safety requirements of the training site.

This training plan shall constitute the curriculum outline for both the individual job training and job-specific related instruction required for each student.

B. General Related Instruction

A written and progressive curriculum stated in measurable terms and reviewed by the program's advisory committee shall be utilized in the delivery of general related instruction.

C. The written plan shall indicate the manner in which these components are scheduled and evaluated.
D. Scheduling Requirements
1. The job training is limited to the time that the coordinator is available to provide the required training site supervision during the days and hours designated in the training plan for cooperative training; a summer program may be offered only if a coordinator is available for supervision.
2. Regular periodic job station visitations shall be conducted by the coordinator and at least 50% of these visits shall be while the student is engaged at the training site.
3. Related instruction shall be required for all students enrolled in a cooperative education program.
E. Time Requirements
1. The minimum annual training time shall be an average of ten hours per week for each school calendar quarter; no more than fifteen hours per week white school is in session may be counted towards this minimum requirement.
2. Twenty percent of the minimum annual training time may be set through forest voluntary activity for IRS registered non-profit groups or associations.
3. The related instruction component of the cooperative education program shall not be toss than one period per day or its equivalent.
4. Actual hours of instruction for each student may be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic core competencies as identified in the approved competency based curriculum. All third party time and task requirements will be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.
F. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all applicable state/federal regulations including facility/personnel licensing requirements.

The placement of cooperative education students on job training sites shall not act to displace full-time workers employed in that establishment.

IV. CLASS SIZE (Student-Teacher Ratios)
A. The recommended student teacher ratio for cooperative education classes is no more than 20-1.
B. When special needs students are mainstreamed into cooperative education classes, that placement shall be in accordance with the Pupil Evaluation Team recommendation; the student shall have a Vocational Individualized Education Plan, and support services as recommended in that plan shall be provided.
C. The number of students that can be adequately supervised at their respective training sites will vary. The following shall be considered in determining the maximum number that may be accommodated at training stations.
1. Distance and travel time,
2. Prior experience at the training site,
3. Training Level of students,
4. Training site supervisor,
5. Handicapped access to training site,
6. Available times at work site,
7. Field time available to coordinator.
V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

A classroom must be available to the cooperative education teacher for related instruction and an area with a telephone for student consultations, making employer contacts, and the filing of student records shall be provided.

VI. EQUIPMENT/SERVICES REQUIRED
A. Texts, career decision materials, and other job related instructional materials shall be provided in sufficient amounts to meet enrollment needs.
VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. The designated student organization for cooperative education is Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. Job related safety and health instruction for cooperative education students shall be identified in the student's job training plan. This instruction may be delivered through the training station or through related instruction.
B. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations
C. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system or information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Cooperative Education Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR THE APPROVAL OF FOOD SERVICE

OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAMS

I. SCOPE

This instructional program prepares individuals in managerial, production, and service skills used in institutional, commercial, or self-owned food establishments or other food industry occupations. Included is instruction in planning, selecting, storing, purchasing, preparing, and serving quantity food and food products; nutritive values; safety and sanitation precautions; use and care of commercial equipment; serving techniques; special diets; and management of food establishments.

Food service career opportunities, goals and objectives and curriculum information are available in the curriculum guide available from the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education.

II. SEQUENCE

Food service occupational programs shall be offered for the length of time necessary to provide trainees the skills and knowledge required at the job-entry level.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Cluster Curricula

Cluster curricula includes an integrated foundation of knowledge and skills essential to a broad spectrum of food service occupations as well as exposure to a variety of career options in the field.

B. Specialty Curricula

Specialty curricula includes education which provides knowledge and skills required of entry level workers in a specified food service occupation.

C. Content
1. Philosophy and Objectives

Each program shall be developed around a statement of philosophy of the vocational center or region.

2. Conceptual Framework

The conceptual framework for the curriculum shall reflect the philosophy of the educational program and shall be relevant to the objectives of the program.

3. Entry-Level Competencies

Entry-level competencies shall be written for each food service course and shall reflect the philosophy and objectives of the educational program.

4. Selection of Learning Experiences

Learning experiences and methods of instruction shall be selected by the program instructors for the most effective accomplishment of the stated competencies for each program.

Each course shall Include planned, supervised laboratory experience as a required part of the educational program. This experience shall be supervised by qualified instructors to ensure that the experiences are educationally oriented and appropriate to meet student objectives.

5. Community-based Work Experience

Community-based work experience in licensed/accredited institutions is strongly recommended. Such experiences shall be conducted in accordance with applicable Department of Labor regulations.

D. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all applicable third party requirements including facility/personnel licensing requirements.

E. Scheduling and Minimum Time Requirements
1. Cluster Curricula

A minimum of 350 hours per year shall be provided for the comprehensive food service cluster program and shall include the instructional units listed in the State Curriculum Guide for Food Service. Actual hours of instruction for each student will be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic care competencies as identified in the approved competency-based curriculum. ALL third party time and task requirements will be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.

2. Specialty Curricula

Short term courses may be offered to meet Local needs. These programs require approval of the Consultant for Food Service Programs, Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education. A minimum of 350 hours shall be provided for this type of program.

IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

Facilities must meet the State Department of Human Services Licensing requirements for eating and lodging establishments.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student Leadership development activities. The designated student organizations for foodservice education programs is Future Homemakers of America/Home Economics Related Occupations (FHA/HERO), or Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. PERSONAL HYGIENE, SANITATION
A. Students shall maintain a high degree of personal cleanliness and shall conform to accepted hygienic practices.
B. Dress Code

Students must meet the following requirements in order to work in food preparation areas and serving areas:

1. No street clothes or outerwear are to be allowed in food preparation or serving areas (including the dishroom). (Smocks, full aprons, or uniforms are acceptable attire.)
2. No flammable fabrics such as flannels or sweaters are to be allowed.
3. Protective shoes with oil resistant non-skid soles are recommended.
4. Positive hair restraints are required.
X. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each Instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

XI. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XII. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Vocational Food Service Program Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR MARKETING PROGRAMS

I. SCOPE

A marketing occupation is one in which employees are engaged primarily in the promoting and merchandising of goods and services. These occupations are commonly found in businesses such as retailing, wholesaling, manufacturing, storing, transporting, financing and service industries.

The objective of marketing education programs shall be to prepare students for employment and/or post-secondary education in the marketing fields.

The marketing program shall be designed to prepare students for employment in marketing careers for which there are existing employment opportunities or for which there are documented anticipated opportunities when the secondary educational program is completed.

II. SEQUENCE

The marketing education course shall be comprehensive and shall provide a sequential course of study and experience in the marketing occupations. Work experience in marketing occupations shall be available to students.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Content

The content for marketing education programs shall be derived from a validated analysis of the functions necessary for the marketing and merchandising of goods and services. The validated analysis shall be updated every 5 years.

B. Training Plan

A detailed training plan shall be cooperatively developed by the coordinator and the training site sponsor. The training plan shall identify:

1. Progressive skills to be learned or applied on the job.
2. Applicable related knowledge for that job.
3. The equipment or machines to be utilized in the job training.
4. The health and safety requirements of the training site.

This training plan shall constitute the curriculum outline for the individual job training and job-specific related instruction.

C. Scheduling Requirements
1. The job training is limited to the time that the coordinator is available to provide the required training site supervision during the days and hours designated in the training plan for cooperative training; a summer program may be offered only if a coordinator is available for supervision.
2. Regular periodic job station visitations shall be conducted by the coordinator and at least 5O% of these visits shall be while the student is engaged at the training site.
D. Time Requirements
1. Marketing vocational education programs shall provide for a minimum of 350 hours of instruction per school year. Programs or career objectives for less than 350 hours per school year may be approved upon application and justification to the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education.
2. Actual hours of instruction for each student may be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic core competencies as identified in the approved competency based curriculum. All third party time and task requirements will be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.
3. The cooperative education component shall average not less than 10 hours per week per quarter; no more than 15 hours per week may be applied to this minimum requirement when school is in session.
E. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all applicable state/federal regulations including facility/personnel licensing requirements.

IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

The ratio for the cooperative education component shall be governed by the time available to the instructor to make training station visitations, develop training plans, and evaluate training stations.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all tines. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. The designated student organization for marketing education programs is Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. Job related safety and health instruction for marketing education students shall be identified in the student's job training plan. This instruction may be delivered through the training station or through related instruction.
B. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
C. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification; Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Marketing Education Program Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR VOCATIONAL DIVERSIFIED OCCUPATIONAL PROGRAMS

(Special Needs)

I. SCOPE

The goals of vocational special needs programs are to teach competencies that will lead to entry level employment. The competencies are to be attained through technical and employability skills instruction.

Major components of the program for vocational education for specific and appropriate jobs and community job development are:

A. Competency-based task analysis
B. Vocational skills attainment
1. According to the performance objectives of each approved vocational module.
2. Individual job goals, extracted from performance objectives in the Individual Vocational Education Plans.
C. Job development/coaching/placement
1. Simulation
2. Inter-agency collaboration (co-op agreement)
3. Job shadowing
4. Supervised work experience up to 40 hours non-paid
5. Paid supervised job experience
6. Employment, independent or with the appropriate adult support services in place.

The program provides additional or supplemental services as identified by the pupil evaluation team in addition to support services provided by consulting models to mainstreamed vocational education special needs students.

D. The development of an individual transition plan from school to work or continued education and training.
II. SEQUENCE

Program sequences may be developed which recognize the unique needs of the special needs student.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. The curriculum shall include, but not be limited to, those areas listed under Section I - SCOPE. Students placed in work experience programs must be learning new skills and/or practicing to obtain a higher level of proficiency.
B. Time requirements shall be determined by the needs identified in the pupil's Vocational Individual Education Plan.
C. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all applicable state/federal regulations Including facility/personnel requirements.

The placement of special needs students in community based work sites shall not displace full-time workers employed in that establishment.

Programs designed for special needs students shall be in accordance with the occupation into which students are being oriented. An occupational analysis shall be utilized to identify those experiences and areas of knowledge to be included in instruction. Consideration shall be given to the unique needs and capabilities of the beneficiaries of the program.

D. Enrollment Procedures

The following steps must be followed for recruitment, enrollment and placement of special needs students:

1. Initial referral by the sending school
2. Student visit to the program
3. Assessment
4. Pupil Evaluation Team recommendation and individual vocational Education Plan, both of which must be written with the vocational instructors participation
5. I.V.E.P. must be maintained at the vocational school and reviewed and updated regularly with sending school personnel
IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

The student-teacher ratio will depend on the severity of the handicapping condition of the students enrolled in the program. Programs are expected to conform to applicable state and federal regulations for special education students.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office Of Education, ore viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities.

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program.. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Special Needs Students Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR TRADE AND INDUSTRY

I. SCOPE

Trade and industrial education includes any offering which is necessary to develop the manipulative skills, technical knowledge and rotated instruction for employment in any craft, skilled trade, single skilled or semiskilled occupation. These occupations may function in the designing, producing, processing, fabricating, assembling, testing, modifying, maintaining, servicing of any product or commodity. It may also include any other occupation or combination of occupations that are usually considered to be trade, technical, or industrial.

The program offered may be specific in nature, preparing learners for specific jobs or for specific occupations. They may also be broader based and prepare learners for a group of closely related occupations. They must be based on known or projected employment opportunities and provide the skills, processes and knowledge necessary for participants to become entry level workers. Preparation for post-secondary education may take place within the context of trade and industrial programs.

II. SEQUENCE

Trade and industrial courses and program offerings may be for varying lengths of time. They must be designed in accordance with the standards of the occupation they represent and be of sufficient length in time to assure the acquisition of entry-level skills for their participants.

They shall be developed or maintained in response to employment opportunities and utilize a current field-validated occupations analysis as its curriculum design base. An individual student's course of study may be flexible but must be directed to previously identified career objectives in a manner that leads to progressive skill and development of knowledge and toward individual career objectives.

Trade and industrial programs shall include both classroom and laboratory experiences. Field experiences may be utilized as part of the laboratory requirement.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Content
1.
a. Each program will have a competency-based curriculum that has been derived from a trade/occupational analysis utilizing practitioners to identify the tasks.
b. The necessary core competencies for entry level employment shall be identified.
2. The curriculum shall identify the objectives of the course of study, and those objectives shall be written in measurable terms.
3. All Learning activities for students shall be directly related to objectives in the curriculum.
4. Safety instruction shall be an integral component of all trade and industrial programs and shall be emphasized in all activities.
B. Time Requirements

Trade and industrial vocational education programs shall provide for a minimum of 350 hours of instruction per school year. Programs or career objectives for less than 350 hours per school year may be approved upon application and justification to the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education. Actual hours of instruction for each student wilt be determined by the individual's ability to meet basic core competencies as identified in the approved competency-based curriculum. All third party time and task requirements wilt be adhered to as per their statute and regulations.

C. Third Party Requirements

The program shall be in compliance with all state/federal regulations including facility/personnel requirements.

IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program wilt be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and wilt vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment wilt represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching motorists and the maintenance of equipment wilt be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, ore viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. The designated student organization for trades and industrial education is Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified In accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

XI. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XII. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Trade and Industrial Education Consultant.

Standards for Vocational Programs

Funded Through General Purpose Aid

Programs in this section of the document include those funded under state general purpose aid. They focus on living skills, vocational exploration and career decision-making.

MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR AGRICULTURE EDUCATION PROGRAMS FUNDED

BY GENERAL PURPOSE AID

I. SCOPE
A. Agriculture education should provide a comprehensive program of instruction which is continuous, sequential and specific. Vocational agriculture programs must reflect the needs of the *merging agricultural industry and represent a balanced combination of the traditional and newly discovered advancements in science and technology. Objectives should be developed with an emphasis on agriscience and agribusiness skills. The development of these skills should include both traditional and innovative approaches to teaching. Such programs should take into consideration the various abilities, interests, skills. and backgrounds of students interested in pursuing a career in agriculture/agribusiness and should reflect current science and technology research. The major program objectives for agriculture education are as follows:
1. to develop competencies needed to engage in agricultural production occupations,
2. to develop competencies needed to engage in agriscience/ agribusiness related occupations,
3. to develop on awareness of career opportunities in agricutture/agribusiness and the preparation needed to enter and progression in those occupations,
4. to encourage participation in short-term cultural enrichment courses which provide knowledge and insight into agricultural education as it impacts upon the world's social and economic needs,
5. to encourage and support the development of essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes which enable students to be successful in postsecondary education,
6. to provide students an opportunity to develop an understanding of, and appreciation for, the scientific principles and technologies of agriculture and to encourage and assist them in the appreciation of this knowledge,
7. to develop basic career and life skills essential for success in agricultural/agribusiness pursuits.
II. SEQUENCE
A. Regular Programs

Courses may be offered at the secondary level designed to meet the needs of students who ore preparing to enter agricultural/ agribusiness occupations or to pursue training at a post-secondary level. Secondary school instructional programs in agriculture may be from one to four years in duration.

B. Supervised Occupational Experience Programs

Occupational experience programs should be continuous and of such nature and duration as to provide the experience necessary to meet the student's occupations objectives. Supervised occupational experience is an integral part of the vocational agriculture program that allows students to become actively involved in tasks performed by people in agricultural occupations.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Scheduling Requirements
1. Courses in agriculture at the secondary level may be offered as part of the regular program and may include the following subject areas:
a. Agricultural Science and Technology
b. Production Agriculture
c. Forestry and Conservation
d. Agricultural Resources
e. Agricultural Mechanics
f. Environmental Science
g. Agribusiness (marketing, supply, production)
h. Animal Sciences
i. Horticulture
j. Landscaping
k. Other agricultural subject areas as identified by the school and community
IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements Identified in the State Board of Education School building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used within the occupation. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment mitt be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program Is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. Designated student organization for agriculture and natural resources education is Future Farmers of America (FFA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each Instructor must be certified In accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It Is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact their Local support system for information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION

(General Purpose Subsidy)

I. SCOPE

Business education is a broad comprehensive discipline. The instructional program encompasses primarily:

(1) knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed by all citizens to manage effectively their personal business needs; (2) to understand the American business and economic system; and (3) to teach vocational knowledge and skills needed for entry-level employment and advancement in business careers.

The responsibility of vocational business education programs is to educate students for meaningful employment in business and office occupations as wall as for post-secondary studies.

The major objectives of business education are:

A. To develop professional attitudes and skills for gainful and meaningful employment including unique and emerging occupations.
B. To provide students with meaningful experiences for acquiring the knowledge necessary to succeed in business and office occupations.
C. To offer courses that serve as the basis for post-secondary studies.
II. SEQUENCE

The vocational business education program of study will be comprehensive and shall include one or more of the prescribed occupations which are:

Executive/Administrative Assistant Office Occupations Business Administration

Courses of study shall include:

A. Executive/Administrative Assistant

Grade 11

Advanced Typewriting Applications

Accounting I

Shorthand I

Grade 12

Advanced Shorthand or Machine Transcriptions

Office Systems and Procedures

Computer Applications

B. Office Occupations

Grade 11

Advanced Typewriting Applications

Office Technology

Accounting I

Grade 12

Automated Accounting

Office Systems and Procedures

Computer Applications

C. Business Administration

Grade 11

Accounting I

Management/Economics

Computer Applications

Grade 12

Automated Accounting

Law

Business Administration Techniques and Practices

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Minimum Time Requirements
1. Time requirements wilt correspond to other course requirements for the school.
B. Third Party Requirements
1. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable state/federal regulations including facility/personnel licensing requirements.
IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth In the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending an the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by an I.V.E.P.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary from program to program; however, equipment will represent that which is currently used In business and industry. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching materials and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. Designated student organization for business education is Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance wilt be provided by the Business Education Consultant.

STANDARD CRITERIA FOR CONSUMER AND HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION PROGRAMS

I. SCOPE

Consumer and home economics education is an educational program designed to provide individuals and families with knowledge and skills to meet the challenges of every day living and attain optimum quality of life. It prepares mates and females, youth and adults, for the dust roles of homemaker/wage-earner in a way that eliminates sex bias and sex stereotyping.

To qualify as an approved Consumer and Home Economics Education Program, a school district shall offer instruction in each of the following areas: Consumer Education, Human Development and Family. Living, Child Development and Parenting, Nutrition and Food Management, Clothing Management, Textiles and Design (including all functional uses of textile products), Housing and Living Environments, Family Economics and Resource Management, and Career Awareness and Exploration of Nome Economics Related Occupations.

The program shall be designed to:

A. Reinforce and integrate academic skills across all home economics content areas.
B. Prepare males and females for sharing family roles and responsibilities as homemakers and wage earners.
C. Eliminate sex bias and sex stereotyping.
D. Address the economic, social, and cultural conditions affecting the quality of family Life especially the needs of people in economically depressed areas.
E. Encourage youth and adults to be aware of their responsibilities to contribute beyond the home as caring and involved citizens.
F. Emphasize family and parenthood education.
G. Emphasize consumer education and resource management to meet changing societal needs.
H. Serve special needs populations such as handicapped and disadvantaged through appropriate programming.
I. Promote the concept that the skills learned in consumer and home economics courses may be applied to education for the world of work.
J. Address the impact of technology on life and work.
II. SEQUENCE

An approved consumer and home economics program shall be offered in middle/junior high school and/or for a minimum of three years in grades 9-12 and shall include those content areas identified in Section I - SCOPE. Courses may be offered as full year comprehensive, semester, or quarterly offerings.

III. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 of the Basic School Approval Regulations states that each school shall have a written curriculum. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

A. Curriculum content shall includes but not be limited to, those areas listed under the SCOPE.
B. Junior high/middle school and senior high school programs shall be coordinated.
IV. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program will be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and will vary depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. The recommended maximum students per instructor in a home economics laboratory is sixteen. Minimum enrollment figures shall be established at the time of program approval and must be maintained in order to ensure continuation of the program. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped may require special services when in regular classes as determined by a Pupil Evaluation Team through an Individual Education Plan.

V. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

A. The facility shall include space for group discussions, individualized instruction, demonstrations, food preparation and service, clothing construction, nursery school and/or other activities as identified in the curriculum.
VI. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

There shall be space for the effective teaching of all phases of a consumer and home economics program including sufficient storage of teaching materials, equipment and supplies. Equipment must be maintained in proper and safe working condition at all times. Sufficient funds for teaching motorists and the maintenance of equipment will be budgeted each year. A plan for regular equipment maintenance and repair shall be developed.

VII. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student Leadership development activities. Designated student organization for consumer and home economics education is Future Homemakers of America/Home Economics Rotated Occupations (FHA/HERO).

VIII. SAFETY
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
IX. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, NASA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning fortification.

X. ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Each program shall establish and maintain an active advisory committee with representation from the broad scope of the industry and community.

XI. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance will be provided by the Consumer and Home Economics Education Consultant.

CONSUMER AND HOME ECONOMICS

EDUCATION GRANT-ELIGIBLE PROGRAMS

The Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act of 1984 ( P.L. 98-524 ) provides funding for the improvement, expansion, or updating of vocationally approved consumer and home economics programs, grades 7 - 12 "falling within an economically depressed area." In accordance with this provision, money is available through the competitive grant process.

MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR

TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (Industrial Arts)

I. SCOPE

Technology Education (Industrial Arts) is a comprehensive educational program concerned with the technical means, evolution, utilization, and significance of industry. It studies the organization, personnel systems, techniques, resources, and products including their social/cultural impact.

Technology Education (Industrial Arts) program content is based upon:

A. organized technological concepts, processes, and systems;
B. Fundamental knowledge about the development of technology and its effect on people, the environment, and culture;
C. Assisting students in developing an understanding of technological concepts, processes, and systems;
D. Assisting students to use toots, motorists, machines, processes, and technical concepts safety and efficiently;
E. Developing student skills, creative abilities, positive selfconcepts, and individual potentials in technology;
F. Developing student problem-solving and decision-making skills;
G. Preparing students for life-long learning in a technological society;
H. Activity-oriented laboratory instruction with students reinforcing abstract concepts with concrete experiences; and
I. Ideally, program offerings K-12, from K-6, programs such as math, science, social studies, and reading can be enhanced greatly with the implementation of a technology education program.
II. CURRICULUM

Chapter 125.04 states, "Each school shall have a written curriculum approved by the commissioner."

Chapter 127.02 defines, "Curriculum shall mean a written document which includes the totality of the school syllabi. The curriculum shall reflect a comprehensive plan for continuous, sequential and specific instruction." (MRSA - 20-A, Chapters 125 and 127)

A. Content

Instructional content shall be drawn from one or more of the following areas:

1. communication - efficiently utilizing resources to transfer information to external human potential;
2. construction - efficiently utilizing resources to build structures or constructed works on a site;
3. manufacturing - efficiently utilizing resources to extract and concert raw/recycled materials into industrial and consumer goods;
4. transportation - efficiently utilizing resources to obtain time and place utility and to attain and maintain direct physical contact and exchange among individuals and societal units through the movement of materials/goods and people;
5. service industries - efficiently using human resources and technical knowledge to maintain the complex technical tools and products our society takes for granted on a day-to-day basis;
6. energy - the efficient utilization of resources for generation, converting, storing, application, and conserving of energy.
B. Schedule

Technology Education (Industrial Arts) classes shall meet the same number of minutes per week as any other course in grades 9-12. Other scheduling arrangements may be approved by the office of Technology Education/Industrial Arts in the Bureau of Adult and Secondary Vocational Education.

C. Third Party Requirement Chapter 125.03

Each school unit and the elementary and secondary schools within it shall meet all requirements of Title 20A, Maine revised statutes, other statutes and rules applicable to the operation of public schools and the requirements of this ruts. (Chapter 125.03, MRSA 20-A)

III. CLASS SIZE

The maximum number of students in a program wilt be governed by the size of the facility as set forth in the State Board of Education school Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, and wilt very depending on the potential hazard the use of equipment presents, the type of instruction necessary, the size of the instructional area and the number of work stations available. The recommended maximum students per instructor in a laboratory is sixteen. Students who are identified as disadvantaged or handicapped way require special services when in regular classes as determined by a Pupil Evaluation Team through an Individual Education Plan.

IV. FACILITIES

Facilities shall be in compliance with the space requirements identified in the State Board of Education School Building Construction Rules, Chapter 061, with national, state and local health and safety codes and Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval.

V. EQUIPMENT/TEACHING MATERIALS

Equipment needs may vary based on Local program needs; however, equipment and materials should be of such a variety as to offer a varied and wide-range of laboratory experiences.

Equipment shall be routinely maintained in good, safe working condition Including appropriate guarding and space requirements.

Effective and current technology teaching materials, toots, and equipment for instructional purposes shot( be provided including books, other printed motorists, audio-visuals, and new and emerging technologies.

VI. STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Student organizations, sanctioned by the U. S. Office of Education, are viewed as ongoing integral components of vocational education programs. Each vocational program is encouraged to provide students with the opportunity to participate in student leadership development activities. Designated student organization for technology education (industrial arts) is Technology Student Association (TSA).

VII. SAFETY (Chapter 125 MRSA20-A )
A. The program shall be in compliance with all applicable federal/state/local safety regulations.
B. Each program shall develop a written safety plan which is in accordance with the overall school/building safety plan.
VIII. TEACHER CERTIFICATION

Programs must identify licensing and certification requirements necessary for the instructor of each proposed program. Each instructor must be certified in accordance with Title 20-A, MRSA, Chapter 502 and DE implementing rules (Chapters 113, 114, 115, 115A, 116, 118A) in the subject area to be taught.

It is the responsibility of the teacher to obtain and maintain Maine certification. Teachers should contact the superintendent's office or their local support system for information concerning certification.

IX. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Technical assistance wilt be provided by the Technology Education (Industrial Arts) Consultant.

Notes

EFFECTIVE DATE (ELECTRONIC CONVERSION): May 19, 1996

STATUTORY AUTHORITY: Title 20-A governing education*and other state and federal regulations; e.g., P.L. 98-524, Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, Chapter 125, Regulations Governing Basic School Approval and Chapter 127 Instruction Requirements and Graduation Standards of the Education Reform Act.

The following state regulations pages link to this page.



State regulations are updated quarterly; we currently have two versions available. Below is a comparison between our most recent version and the prior quarterly release. More comparison features will be added as we have more versions to compare.