10 U.S. Code SUBCHAPTER V— EDUCATIONAL AND TRAINING ACTIVITIES

Amendments

2018—Pub. L. 115–232, div. A, title XII, §§ 1204(c)(1)(C), 1207(b), 1208(a)(2), 1209(b)(2), Aug. 13, 2018, 132 Stat. 2017, 2020, 2021, 2023, substituted “Centers for Security Studies” for “centers for security studies” in item 342, inserted “and Irregular Warfare” after “Terrorism” in item 345, inserted “Sec.” after item 350, and added items 351 and 352.

Defense Institute of International Legal Studies

Pub. L. 115–91, div. A, title XII, § 1207, Dec. 12, 2017, 131 Stat. 1645, provided that:

“(a)In General.—The Secretary of Defense may operate an institute to be known as the ‘Defense Institute of International Legal Studies’ (in this section referred to as the ‘Institute’) in accordance with this section to further the United States security and foreign policy objectives of—
“(1)
promoting an understanding of and appreciation for the rule of law; and
“(2)
encouraging the international development of internal capacities of foreign governments for civilian control of the military, military justice, the legal aspects of peacekeeping, good governance and anti-corruption in defense reform, and human rights.
“(b)Activities.—In carrying out the purposes specified in subsection (a), the Institute may conduct activities as follows:
“(1)
Exchange of ideas on best practices and lessons learned in order to improve compliance with international legal norms.
“(2)
Education and training involving professional legal engagement with foreign military personnel and related civilians, both within and outside the United States.
“(3)
Building the legal capacity of foreign military and other security forces, including equitable, transparent, and accountable defense institutions, civilian control of the military, human rights, and democratic governance.
“(4)
Institutional legal capacity building of foreign defense and security institutions.
“(c) Department of Defense Review.—
“(1)In general.—
The Secretary shall conduct a comprehensive review of the mission, workforce, funding, and other support of the Institute.
“(2)Elements.—The review shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
“(A)
An assessment of the scope of the mission of the Institute, taking into account the increasing security cooperation authorities and requirements of the Department of Defense, including core rule of law training in the United States and abroad, defense legal institution building, and statutorily required human rights and legal capacity building of foreign security forces.
“(B)
An assessment of the workforce of the Institute, including whether it is appropriately sized to align with the full scope of the mission of the Institute.
“(C)
A review of the funding mechanisms for the activities of the Institute, including the current mechanisms for reimbursing the Institute by the Department of State and by the Department of Defense through the budget of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency.
“(D)
An evaluation of the feasibility and advisability of the provision of funds appropriated for the Department of Defense directly to the Institute, and the actions, if any, required to authorize the Institute to receive such funds directly.
“(E)
A description of the challenges, if any, faced by the Institute to increase its capacity to provide residence courses to meet demands for training and assistance.
“(F)
An assessment of the capacity of the Department of Defense to assess, monitor, and evaluate the effectiveness of the human rights training and other activities of the Institute.
“(3)Report.—
Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act [Dec. 12, 2017], the Secretary shall submit to the congressional defense committees [Committees on Armed Services and Appropriations of the Senate and the House of Representatives] a report summarizing the findings of the review and any recommendations for enhancing the capability of the Institute to fulfill its mission that the Secretary considers appropriate.
“(d) Comptroller General of the United States Report.—
“(1)In general.—Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act [Dec. 12, 2017], the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the appropriate committees of Congress a report that sets forth the following:
“(A)
A description of the mechanisms and authorities used by the Department of Defense and the Department of State to conduct training of foreign security forces on human rights and international humanitarian law.
“(B)
A description of the funding used to support the training described in subparagraph (A).
“(C)
A description and assessment of the methodology used by each of the Department of Defense and the Department of State to assess the effectiveness of such training.
“(D)
Such recommendations for improvements to such training as the Comptroller General considers appropriate.
“(E)
Such other matters relating to such training as the Comptroller General considers appropriate.
“(2)Appropriate committees of congress defined.—In this subsection, the term ‘appropriate committees of Congress’ means—
“(A)
the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate; and
“(B)
the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives.”