22 U.S. Code § 9542. Sense of Congress

It is the sense of Congress that—
(1)
the Government of the Russian Federation bears responsibility for the continuing violence in Eastern Ukraine, including the death on April 24, 2017, of Joseph Stone, a citizen of the United States working as a monitor for the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe;
(2) the President should call on the Government of the Russian Federation—
(A)
to withdraw all of its forces from the territories of Georgia, Ukraine, and Moldova;
(B)
to return control of the borders of those territories to their respective governments; and
(C)
to cease all efforts to undermine the popularly elected governments of those countries;
(3)
the Government of the Russian Federation has applied, and continues to apply, to the countries and peoples of Georgia and Ukraine, traditional uses of force, intelligence operations, and influence campaigns, which represent clear and present threats to the countries of Europe and Eurasia;
(4)
in response, the countries of Europe and Eurasia should redouble efforts to build resilience within their institutions, political systems, and civil societies;
(5)
the United States supports the institutions that the Government of the Russian Federation seeks to undermine, including the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union;
(6)
a strong North Atlantic Treaty Organization is critical to maintaining peace and security in Europe and Eurasia;
(7)
the United States should continue to work with the European Union as a partner against aggression by the Government of the Russian Federation, coordinating aid programs, development assistance, and other counter-Russian efforts;
(8)
the United States should encourage the establishment of a commission for media freedom within the Council of Europe, modeled on the Venice Commission regarding rule of law issues, that would be chartered to provide governments with expert recommendations on maintaining legal and regulatory regimes supportive of free and independent media and an informed citizenry able to distinguish between fact-based reporting, opinion, and disinformation;
(9) in addition to working to strengthen the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union, the United States should work with the individual countries of Europe and Eurasia—
(A)
to identify vulnerabilities to aggression, disinformation, corruption, and so-called hybrid warfare by the Government of the Russian Federation;
(B)
to establish strategic and technical plans for addressing those vulnerabilities;
(C)
to ensure that the financial systems of those countries are not being used to shield illicit financial activity by officials of the Government of the Russian Federation or individuals in President Vladimir Putin’s inner circle who have been enriched through corruption;
(D)
to investigate and prosecute cases of corruption by Russian actors; and
(E)
to work toward full compliance with the Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions (commonly referred to as the “Anti-Bribery Convention”) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development; and
(10) the President of the United States should use the authority of the President to impose sanctions under—
(A)
the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act of 2012 (title IV of Public Law 112–208; 22 U.S.C. 5811 note); and
(B)
the Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act (subtitle F of title XII of Public Law 114–328; 22 U.S.C. 2656 note).
References in Text

The Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act of 2012, referred to in par. (10)(A), is title IV of Pub. L. 112–208, Dec. 14, 2012, 126 Stat. 1502, which is set out as a note under section 5811 of this title.

The Global Magnitsky Human Rights Accountability Act, referred to in par. (10)(B), is subtitle F (§§ 1261–1265) of title XII of div. A of Pub. L. 114–328, Dec. 23, 2016, 130 Stat. 2533, which is set out as a note under section 2656 of this title.