Women and Justice: Court: Connecticut Court of Appeals

Domestic Case Law

Krystyna W. v. Janusz W. Connecticut Court of Appeals (2011)

Domestic and intimate partner violence

Court of Appeal affirmed the trial court’s grant of a domestic violence restraining order requested by plaintiff against her husband. In this case, the defendant had threatened to seek revenge on his children because they had hospitalized him. Defendant walked around the house with knives, verbally abused the children, and prevented the family from sleeping by making loud noises. While intoxicated, defendant had also previously asked his son to kill him with a hammer and knife. The court noted that Connecticut’s Gen. Stat. § 46b-15 “clearly requires a continuous threat of present physical pain or physical injury before a court can grant a domestic violence restraining order.” The court found that the above facts presented enough of a continuous threat of present physical pain or injury so that the trial court’s ruling was not an abuse of discretion, and affirmed the grant of a restraining order.



Joni S. v. Ricky S. Connecticut Court of Appeals (2010)

Domestic and intimate partner violence

Defendant appealed the trial court’s award of a restraining order. The trial court had granted the order because the plaintiff made a showing that the defendant, her ex-husband, was obsessed with her to a point where it clouded his judgment and she was afraid he would harm her. Plaintiff made this showing through evidence that after the parties were divorced, plaintiff had seen the defendant drive by her house repeatedly, she had received flowers from the defendant one day at work and later that night under the windshield wiper of her car, she was concerned that the defendant was in her driveway while they were separated, and that she was afraid because she thought the defendant went to anger management therapy and lived nearby. The parties’ daughter testified that she also believed the defendant was obsessed with the plaintiff. Under Ct. Gen. S. § 46b-15, anyone who has been subject to a continuous threat of present physical pain or physical injury by another household member or is in a dating relationship and been subjected to these threats may apply to the superior court for relief. The appellate court found the plaintiff showed sufficient evidence of a continuous threat of present physical pain or physical injury, as the defendant’s obsession with her could lead him to harm her, and affirmed the trial court’s grant of a restraining order.



State v. Little, 127 Conn.App. 336 Connecticut Court of Appeals (2011)

Sexual violence and rape

Here, the defendant had a prior conviction of sexual assault in the third degree.  He was sentenced to two years of prison with three years probation.  Under Gen. Stat. § 54-252, the defendant was required to register as a sex offender with the sex offender registry unit of the state policy.  Id. at 338.  While the defendant initially registered after his release from prison, he later failed to comply with all of the registration reporting requirements.  Id.  Specifically, he failed to return an address verification form.  The defendant had moved and six months later, contacted the registry office to send correspondence to his new address so he could update his registry.  Id.  The defendant since remained in compliance with registry requirements.  Nonetheless, the court affirmed the trial court’s conviction that the defendant failed to comply with sex offender registration requirements.