26 CFR § 601.501 - Scope of rules; definitions.

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§ 601.501 Scope of rules; definitions.

(a)Scope of rules. The rules prescribed in this subpart concern, among other things, the representation of taxpayers before the Internal Revenue Service under the authority of a power of attorney. These rules apply to all offices of the Internal Revenue Service in all matters under the jurisdiction of the Internal Revenue Service and apply to practice before the Internal Revenue Service (as defined in 31 CFR 10.2(a) and 10.7(a)(7). For special provisions relating to alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities, see §§ 601.521 through 601.527. These rules detail the means by which a recognized representative is authorized to act on behalf of a taxpayer. Such authority must be evidenced by a power of attorney and declaration of representative filed with the appropriate office of the Internal Revenue Service. In general, a power of attorney must contain certain information concerning the taxpayer, the recognized representative, and the specific tax matter(s) for which the recognized representative is authorized to act. (See § 601.503(a).) A “declaration of representative” is a written statement made by a recognized representative that he/she is currently eligible to practice before the Internal Revenue Service and is authorized to represent the particular party on whose behalf he/she acts. (See § 601.502(c).)

(b)Definitions -

(1)Attorney-in-fact. An agent authorized by a principal under a power of attorney to perform certain specified act(s) or kinds of act(s) on behalf of the principal.

(2)Centralized Authorization File (CAF) system. An automated file containing information regarding the authority of a person appointed under a power of attorney or designated under a tax information authorization.

(3)Circular No. 230. Treasury Department Circular No. 230 codified, at 31 CFR part 10, which sets forth the regulations governing practice before the Internal Revenue Service.

(4)Declaration of representative. (See § 601.502(c).)

(5)Delegation of authority. An act performed by a recognized representative whereby authority given under a power of attorney is delegated to another recognized representative. After a delegation is made, both the original recognized representative and the recognized representative to whom a delegation is made will be recognized to represent the taxpayer. (See § 601.505(b)(2).)

(6)Form 2848, “Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative.” The Internal Revenue Servicepower of attorney form which may be used by a taxpayer who wishes to appoint an individual to represent him/her before the Internal Revenue Service. (See § 601.503(b)(1).)

(7)Matter. The application of each tax imposed by the Internal Revenue Code and the regulations thereunder for each taxable period constitutes a (separate) matter.

(8)Office of the Internal Revenue Service. The Office of each district director, the office of each service center, the office of each compliance center, the office of each regional commissioner, and the National Office constitute separate offices of the Internal Revenue Service.

(9)Power of attorney. A document signed by the taxpayer, as principal, by which an individual is appointed as attorney-in-fact to perform certain specified act(s) or kinds of act(s) on behalf of the principal. Specific types of powers of attorney include the following -

(i)General power of attorney. The attorney-in-fact is authorized to perform any or all acts the taxpayer can perform.

(ii)Durable power of attorney. A power of attorney which specifies that the appointment of the attorney-in-fact will not end due to either the passage of time (i.e., the authority conveyed will continue until the death of the taxpayer) or the incompetency of the principal (e.g., the principal becomes unable or is adjudged incompetent to perform his/her business affairs).

(iii)Limited power of attorney. A power of attorney which is limited in any facet (i.e., a power of attorney authorizing the attorney-in-fact to perform only certain specified acts as contrasted to a general power of attorney authorizing the representative to perform any and all acts the taxpayer can perform).

(10)Practice before the Internal Revenue Service. Practice before the Internal Revenue Service encompasses all matters connected with presentation to the Internal Revenue Service or any of its personnel relating to a taxpayer's rights, privileges, or liabilities under laws or regulations administered by the Internal Revenue Service. Such presentations include the preparation and filing of necessary documents, correspondence with and communications to the Internal Revenue Service, and the representation of a taxpayer at conferences, hearings, and meetings. (See 31 CFR 10.2(a) and 10.7(a)(7).)

(11)Principal. A person (i.e., taxpayer) who appoints an attorney-in-fact under a power of attorney.

(12)Recognized representative. An individual who is recognized to practice before the Internal Revenue Service under the provisions of § 601.502.

(13)Representation. Acts performed on behalf of a taxpayer by a representative in practice before the Internal Revenue Service. (See § 601.501(b)(10).) Representation does not include the furnishing of information at the request of the Internal Revenue Service or any of its officers or employees. (See 31 CFR 10.7(c).)

(14)Substitution of representative. An act performed by an attorney-in-fact whereby authority given under a power of attorney is transferred to another recognized representative. After a substitution is made, only the newly recognized representative will be considered the taxpayer's representative. (See § 601.505(b)(2).)

(15)Tax information authorization. A document signed by the taxpayer authorizing any individual or entity (e.g., corporation, partnership, trust or organization) designated by the taxpayer to receive and/or inspect confidential tax information in a specified matter. (See section 6103 of the Internal Revenue Code and the regulations thereunder.)

(c)Conferences -

(1)Scheduling. The Internal Revenue Service encourages the discussion of any Federal tax matter affecting a taxpayer. Conferences may be offered only to taxpayers and/or their recognized representative(s) acting under a valid power of attorney. As a general rule, such conferences will not be held without previous arrangement. However, if a compelling reason is shown by the taxpayer that an immediate conference should be held, the Internal Revenue Service official(s) responsible for the matter has the discretion to make an exception to the general rule.

(2)Submission of information. Every written protest, brief, or other statement the taxpayer or recognized representative wishes to be considered at any conference should be submitted to or filed with the appropriate Internal Revenue Service official(s) at least five business days before the date of the conference. If the taxpayer or the representative is unable to meet this requirement, arrangement should be made with the appropriate Internal Revenue Service official for a postponement of the conference to a date mutually agreeable to the parties. The taxpayer or the representative remains free to submit additional or supporting facts or evidence within a reasonable time after the conference.

[56 FR 24003, May 28, 1991; amended at 57 FR 27356, June 19, 1992]