40 CFR § 1065.501 - Overview.

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§ 1065.501 Overview.

(a) Use the procedures detailed in this subpart to measure engine emissions over a specified duty cycle. Refer to subpart J of this part for field test procedures that describe how to measure emissions during in-use engine operation. This section describes how to:

(1) Map your engine, if applicable, by recording specified speed and torque data, as measured from the engine's primary output shaft.

(2) Transform normalized duty cycles into reference duty cycles for your engine by using an engine map.

(3) Prepare your engine, equipment, and measurement instruments for an emission test.

(4) Perform pre-test procedures to verify proper operation of certain equipment and analyzers.

(5) Record pre-test data.

(6) Start or restart the engine and sampling systems.

(7) Sample emissions throughout the duty cycle.

(8) Record post-test data.

(9) Perform post-test procedures to verify proper operation of certain equipment and analyzers.

(10) Weigh PM samples.

(b) Unless we specify otherwise, you may control the regeneration timing of infrequently regenerated aftertreatment devices such as diesel particulate filters using good engineering judgment. You may control the regeneration timing using a sequence of engine operating conditions or you may initiate regeneration with an external regeneration switch or other command. This provision also allows you to ensure that a regeneration event does not occur during an emission test.

(c) An emission test generally consists of measuring emissions and other parameters while an engine follows one or more duty cycles that are specified in the standard-setting part. There are two general types of duty cycles:

(1) Transient cycles. Transient duty cycles are typically specified in the standard-setting part as a second-by-second sequence of speed commands and normalized torque (or power) commands. Operate an engine over a transient cycle such that the speed and torque of the engine's primary output shaft follows the target values. Proportionally sample emissions and other parameters and use the calculations in subpart G of this part to calculate emissions. Start a transient test according to the standard-setting part, as follows:

(i) A cold-start transient cycle where you start to measure emissions just before starting an engine that has not been warmed up.

(ii) A hot-start transient cycle where you start to measure emissions just before starting a warmed-up engine.

(iii) A hot running transient cycle where you start to measure emissions after an engine is started, warmed up, and running.

(2) Steady-state cycles. Steady-state duty cycles are typically specified in the standard-setting part as a list of discrete operating points ( modes or notches), where each operating point has one value of a normalized speed command and one value of a normalized torque (or power) command. Ramped-modal cycles for steady-state testing also list test times for each mode and transition times between modes where speed and torque are linearly ramped between modes, even for cycles with % power. Start a steady-state cycle as a hot running test, where you start to measure emissions after an engine is started, warmed up and running. Run a steady-state duty cycle as a discrete-mode cycle or a ramped-modal cycle, as follows:

(i) Discrete-mode cycles. Before emission sampling, stabilize an engine at the first discrete mode of the duty cycle specified in the standard-setting part. Sample emissions and other parameters for that mode in the same manner as a transient cycle, with the exception that reference speed and torque values are constant. Record data for that mode, transition to the next mode, and then stabilize the engine at the next mode. Continue to sample each mode discretely as a separate test interval and calculate composite brake-specific emission results according to § 1065.650(g)(2).

(A) Use good engineering judgment to determine the time required to stabilize the engine. You may make this determination before starting the test based on prior experience, or you may make this determination in real time based an automated stability criteria. If needed, you may continue to operate the engine after reaching stability to get laboratory equipment ready for sampling.

(B) Collect PM on separate PM sample media for each mode.

(C) The minimum sample time is 60 seconds. We recommend that you sample both gaseous and PM emissions over the same test interval. If you sample gaseous and PM emissions over different test intervals, there must be no change in engine operation between the two test intervals. These two test intervals may completely or partially overlap, they may run consecutively, or they may be separated in time.

(ii) Ramped-modal cycles. Perform ramped-modal cycles similar to the way you would perform transient cycles, except that ramped-modal cycles involve mostly steady-state engine operation. Generate a ramped-modal duty cycle as a sequence of second-by-second (1 Hz) reference speed and torque points. Run the ramped-modal duty cycle in the same manner as a transient cycle and use the 1 Hz reference speed and torque values to validate the cycle, even for cycles with % power. Proportionally sample emissions and other parameters during the cycle and use the calculations in subpart G of this part to calculate emissions.

(d) Other subparts in this part identify how to select and prepare an engine for testing (subpart E), how to perform the required engine service accumulation (subpart E), and how to calculate emission results (subpart G).

(e) Subpart J of this part describes how to perform field testing.

[79 FR 23773, Apr. 28, 2014]