Tenn. Comp. R. & Regs. 0400-45-01-.33 - CONTROL OF LEAD AND COPPER

(1) General Requirements
(a) Applicability
1. The requirements of this rule constitute primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. Unless otherwise indicated each of the provisions of this rule apply to community and non-transient, non-community water systems.
2. Reserved
(b) Scope. These regulations establish a treatment technique that includes requirements for corrosion control treatment, source water treatment, lead service line replacement, and public education. These actions are triggered, in some cases, by lead and copper action levels measured in samples collected at consumers' tap.
(c) Lead and Copper action levels.
1. The lead action level is exceeded if the concentration of lead in more than 10 percent of tap water samples collected during any monitoring period is greater than 0.015 mg/l (i.e., if the "90th percentile" lead level is greater than 0.015 mg/l).
2. The copper action level is exceeded if the concentration of copper in more than 10 percent of tap water samples collected during any monitoring period is greater than 1.3 mg/l (i.e., if the "90th percentile" copper level is greater than 1.3 mg/l).
3. The 90th percentile lead and copper levels shall be computed as follows:
(i) The results of all lead or copper samples taken during a monitoring period shall be placed in ascending order from the sample with the lowest concentration to the sample with the highest concentration. Each sampling result shall be assigned a number, ascending by single integers beginning with the number 1 for the sample with the lowest contaminant level. The number assigned to the sample with the highest contaminant level shall be equal to the total number of samples taken.
(ii) The number of samples taken during the monitoring period shall be multiplied by 0.9.
(iii) The contaminant concentration in the numbered sample yielded by the calculation in subpart (ii) of this part is the 90th percentile contaminant level.
(iv) For water systems serving fewer than 100 people that collect 5 samples per monitoring period, the 90th percentile is computed by taking the average of the highest and second highest concentrations.
(v) For a public water system that has been allowed by the Department to collect fewer than five samples in accordance with subparagraph (7)(c) of this rule, the sample result with the highest concentration is considered the 90th percentile value.
(d) Corrosion control treatment requirements.
1. All water systems shall install and operate optimal corrosion control treatment as defined in Rule 0400-45-01-.04.
2. Any water system that complies with the applicable corrosion control treatment requirements set forth in paragraphs (2) and (3) of this rule shall be deemed in compliance with the treatment requirement contained in part 1. of this subparagraph.
(e) Source water treatment requirements. Any system exceeding the lead or copper action level shall implement all applicable source water treatment requirements set forth in paragraph (4) of this rule.
(f) Lead service line replacement. Any system exceeding the lead action level after implementation of applicable corrosion control and source water treatment requirements shall complete the lead service line replacement requirements set forth in paragraph (5) of this rule.
(g) Public education requirements. Pursuant to paragraph (6) of this rule, all water systems must provide a consumer notice of lead tap water monitoring results to persons served at the sites (taps) that are tested. Any system exceeding the lead action level shall implement the public education requirements set forth in paragraph (6) of this rule.
(h) Monitoring and analytical requirements. Tap water monitoring for lead and copper, monitoring for water quality parameters, source water monitoring for lead and copper, and analysis of the monitoring results shall be completed in compliance with paragraphs (7), (8), (9) and (10) of this rule.
(i) Reporting Requirements. Systems shall report to the Department any information required by the treatment provisions of this rule.
(j) Recordkeeping requirements. Systems shall maintain records in accordance with paragraph (12) of this rule.
(k) Violation of primary drinking water regulations. Failure to comply with the applicable requirements of this rule, including requirements established by the Department pursuant to these provisions, shall constitute a violation of the primary drinking water regulations for lead and/or copper.
(2) Applicability of corrosion control treatment steps to small, medium and large water systems.
(a) Systems shall complete the applicable corrosion control treatment requirements described in paragraph (3) of this rule by the deadlines established in this paragraph.
1. A large system (serving > 50,000 persons) shall complete the corrosion control treatment steps specified in subparagraph (d) of this paragraph, unless it is deemed to have optimized corrosion control under part (b)2. or 3. of this paragraph.
2. A small system (serving [LESS THAN EQAUL TO] 3300 persons) and a medium-size system (serving > 3,300 and [LESS THAN EQAUL TO] 50,000 persons) shall complete the corrosion control treatment steps of specified in subparagraph (e) of this paragraph, unless it is deemed to have optimized corrosion control under part (b)1., 2. or 3. of this paragraph.
(b) A system is deemed to have optimized corrosion control and is not required to complete the applicable corrosion control treatment steps identified if the system satisfies one of the criteria specified in parts 1. through 3. of this subparagraph. Any such system deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph, and which has treatment in place, shall continue to operate and maintain optimal corrosion control treatment and meet any requirements that the Department determines appropriate to ensure optimal corrosion control treatment is maintained.
1. A small or medium-size water system is deemed to have optimized corrosion control if the system meets the lead and copper action levels during each of two consecutive six-month monitoring periods conducted in accordance with paragraph (7) of this rule.
2. Any water system may be deemed by the Department to have optimized corrosion control treatment if the system demonstrates to the satisfaction of the Department that it has conducted activities equivalent to the corrosion control steps applicable to such system under this paragraph. If the Department makes this determination, it shall provide the system with written notice explaining the basis for its decision and shall specify the water quality control parameters representing optimal corrosion control in accordance with subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule. Water systems deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph shall operate in compliance with the Department-designated optimal water quality control parameters in accordance with subparagraph (3)(g) of this rule and continue to conduct lead and copper tap and water quality parameter sampling in accordance with part (7)(d)3. and subparagraph (8)(d) of this rule, respectively. A system shall provide the Department with the following information in order to support a determination under this paragraph:
(i) The results of all test samples collected for each of the water quality parameters in part (3)(c)3. of this rule.
(ii) A report explaining the test methods used by the water system to evaluate the corrosion control treatments listed in part (3)(c)1. of this rule. The results of all tests conducted, and the basis for the system's selection of optimal corrosion control treatment;
(iii) A report explaining how corrosion control has been installed and how it is being maintained to insure minimal lead and copper concentrations at consumers' taps;
(iv) The results of tap water samples collected in accordance with paragraph (7) of this rule at least once every six months for one year after corrosion control has been installed.
3. Any water system is deemed to have optimized corrosion control if it submits results of tap water monitoring conducted in accordance with paragraph (7) of this rule and source water monitoring conducted in accordance with paragraph (9) of this rule that demonstrates for two consecutive 6-month monitoring periods that the difference between the 90th percentile tap water lead level computed under part (1)(c)3. of this rule, and the highest source water lead concentration is less than the Practical Quantitation Level for lead specified in subpart (10)(a)1.(ii) of this rule.
(i) Those systems whose highest source water lead level is below the Method Detection Limit may also be deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph if the 90th percentile tap water lead level is less than or equal to the Practical Quantitation Level for lead for two consecutive 6-month monitoring periods.
(ii) Any water system deemed to have optimized corrosion control in accordance with this paragraph shall continue monitoring for lead and copper at the tap no less frequently than once every three calendar years using the reduced number of sites specified in subparagraph (7)(c) of this rule and collecting the samples at times and locations specified in subpart (7)(d)4.(iv) of this rule. Any such system that has not conducted a round of monitoring pursuant to subparagraph (7)(d) of this rule since September 30, 1997, shall complete a round of monitoring pursuant to this paragraph no later than September 30, 2000.
(iii) Any water system deemed to have optimized corrosion control pursuant to this paragraph shall notify the Department in writing pursuant to subparagraph (11)(a) of this rule of any upcoming long term change in treatment or addition of a new source as described in this rule. The Department must review and approve the addition of a new source or long term change in water treatment before it is implemented by the water systems. The Department may require any such system to conduct additional monitoring or to take other action the Department deems appropriate to ensure that such systems maintain minimal levels of corrosion in the distribution system.
(iv) As of July 12, 2001, a system is not deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph, and shall implement corrosion control treatment pursuant to subpart (v) of this part unless it meets the copper action level.
(v) Any system triggered into corrosion control because it is no longer deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph shall implement corrosion control treatment in accordance with the deadlines in subparagraph (e) of this paragraph. Any such large system shall adhere to the schedule specified in that paragraph for medium-size systems, with the time periods for completing each step being triggered by the date the system is no longer deemed to have optimized corrosion control under this paragraph.
(c) Any small or medium-size water system that is required to complete the corrosion control steps due to its exceedance of the lead or copper action level may cease completing the treatment steps whenever the system meets both action levels during each of two consecutive monitoring periods conducted pursuant to paragraph (7) of this rule and submits the results to the Department. If any such water system thereafter exceeds the lead or copper action level during any monitoring period, the system shall recommence completion of the applicable treatment steps, beginning with the first treatment step which was not previously completed in its entirety. The Department may require a system to repeat treatment steps previously completed by the system where the Department determines that this is necessary to implement properly the treatment requirements of this paragraph. The Department shall notify the system in writing of such a determination and explain the basis for its decision that includes but is limited to the information required under part (b)2. of this paragraph. The requirement for any small or medium-size system to implement corrosion control treatment steps in accordance with subparagraph (e) of this paragraph (including systems deemed to have optimized corrosion control under part (b)1. of this paragraph) is triggered whenever any small or medium-size system exceeds the lead or copper action level.
(d) Treatment steps and deadlines for large systems. Except as provided in parts (b)2. and 3. of this paragraph, large systems shall complete the following corrosion control treatment steps [described in the referenced portions of paragraphs (3), (7) and (8) of this rule] by the indicated dates.
1. Step 1: The system shall conduct initial monitoring [part (7)(d)1. and subparagraph (8)(b) of this rule], during two consecutive six-month monitoring periods by January 1, 1993.
2. Step 2: The system shall complete corrosion control studies [subparagraph (3)(c) of this rule] by July 1, 1994.
3. Step 3: The Department shall designate optimal corrosion control treatment [subparagraph (3)(d) of this rule] by January 1, 1995.
4. Step 4: The system shall install optimal corrosion control treatment [subparagraph (3)(e) of this rule] by January 1, 1997.
5. Step 5: The system shall complete follow-up sampling by [part (7)(d)2. and subparagraph (8)(c) of this rule] by January 1, 1998.
6. Step 6: The Department shall review installation of treatment and designate optimal water quality control parameters [subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule] by July 1, 1998.
7. Step 7: The system shall continue thereafter to operate in compliance with the Department-specified optimal water quality control parameters [subparagraph (3)(g) of this rule] and continue to conduct tap sampling [part (7)(d)3. and subparagraph (8)(d) of this rule].
(e) Treatment steps and deadlines for small and medium-sized systems. Except as provided in subparagraph (b) of this paragraph, small and medium-size systems shall complete the following corrosion control treatment steps by the indicated time periods.
1. Step 1: The system shall conduct initial tap sampling until the system either exceeds the lead or copper action level or becomes eligible for reduced monitoring under part (7)(d)4. of this rule. A system exceeding the lead or copper action level shall recommend optimal corrosion control treatment [subparagraph (3)(a) of this rule] within six months after the end of the monitoring period during which it exceeds one of the action levels; and
2. Step 2: Within 12 months after the end of the monitoring period during which a system exceeds the lead or copper action level, the Department may require the system to perform corrosion control studies [subparagraph (3)(b) of this rule]. If the Department does not require the system to perform such studies, the Department shall specify optimal corrosion treatment pursuant to subparagraph (3)(d) of this rule within the following timeframes:
(i) for medium-size systems, within 18 months after the end of the monitoring period during which such system exceeds the lead or copper action level; and
(ii) for small systems, within 24 months after the end of the monitoring period during which such system exceeds the lead or copper action level.
3. Step 3: If the Department requires a system to perform corrosion control studies under step 2, the system shall complete the studies within 18 months after the Department requires that such studies be conducted.
4. Step 4: If the system has performed corrosion control studies under step 2, the Department shall designate optimal corrosion treatment within 6 months after completion of step 3.
5. Step 5: The system shall install optimal corrosion control treatment within 24 months after the Department designates such treatment.
6. Step 6: The system shall complete follow-up sampling within 36 months after the Department designates optimal corrosion control treatment.
7. Step 7: The Department shall review the system's installation of treatment and designate optimal water quality control parameters within 6 months after completion of step 6.
8. Step 8: The system shall continue thereafter to operate in compliance with the Department-designated optimal water quality control parameters and continue to conduct tap sampling.
(3) Description of corrosion control treatment requirements. Each system shall complete the corrosion control treatment requirement described in this paragraph, which are applicable to such a system as described in paragraph (2) of this rule.
(a) System recommendation regarding corrosion control treatment. Based upon the results of lead and copper tap monitoring and water quality parameter monitoring, small and medium-size water systems exceeding the lead or copper action level shall recommend installation of one or more of the corrosion control treatments listed in part (c)1. of this paragraph, which the system believes constitutes optimal corrosion control for that system. The Department may require the system to conduct additional water quality parameter monitoring in accordance with subparagraph (8)(b) of this rule to assist the Department in reviewing the system's recommendation.
(b) The Department may require any small or medium-size system that exceeds the lead or copper action level to perform corrosion control studies under subparagraph (c) of this paragraph to identify optimal corrosion control treatment for the system.
(c) Performance of corrosion control studies.
1. Any public water system performing corrosion control studies shall evaluate the effectiveness of each of the following treatments, and, if appropriate, combinations of the following treatments to identify the optimal corrosion control treatment for that system:
(i) Alkalinity and pH adjustment;
(ii) Calcium hardness adjustment; and
(iii) The addition of a phosphate or silicate based corrosion inhibitor at a concentration sufficient to maintain an effective residual concentration in all test tap samples.
2. The water system shall evaluate each of the corrosion control treatments using either pipe rig/loop tests, metal coupon tests, partial-system tests, or analyses based on documented analogous treatments approved by the Department with other systems of similar size, water chemistry and distribution system configuration.
3. The water system shall measure the following water quality parameters in any tests conducted under this paragraph before and after evaluating the corrosion control treatments listed in part 1. of this subparagraph:
(i) Lead;
(ii) Copper;
(iii) pH;
(iv) Alkalinity;
(v) Calcium;
(vi) Conductivity
(vii) Orthophosphate (when an inhibitor containing a phosphate compound is used);
(viii) Silicate (when an inhibitor containing a silicate compound is used);
(ix) Water temperature; and
(x) Other parameters identified by the Department.
4. The water system shall identify all chemical or physical constraints that limit or prohibit the use of a particular corrosion control treatment and document such constraints with at least one of the following:
(i) Data and documentation showing that a particular corrosion control treatment has adversely affected other water treatment processes when used by another water system with comparable water quality characteristics; and/or
(ii) Data documentation demonstrating that the water system has previously attempted to evaluate a particular corrosion control treatment and has found that the treatment is ineffective or adversely affects other water quality treatment processes.
5. The water system shall evaluate the effect of the chemicals used for corrosion control treatment on other water quality treatment processes.
6. On the basis of an analysis of the data generated during each evaluation, the water system shall recommend to the Department, in writing, the treatment option that the corrosion control studies indicate constitutes optimal corrosion control treatment for that system. The water system shall provide a rationale for its recommendation along with all supporting documentation specified in parts 1. through 5. of this subparagraph.
(d) Department designation of optimal corrosion control treatment.
1. Based upon consideration of available information including, where applicable, studies performed under subparagraph (c) of this paragraph and a system's recommended treatment alternative, the Department shall either approve the corrosion control treatment option recommended by the system, or designate alternative corrosion control treatment(s) from among those listed in part (c)1 of this paragraph. When designating optimal treatment the Department may consider the effects that additional corrosion control treatment will have on water quality parameters and on other water quality treatment processes.
2. The Department shall notify the system of its decision on optimal corrosion control treatment in writing and explain the basis for this determination. If the Department requests additional information to aid its review, the water system shall provide the information.
(e) Installation of optimal corrosion control. Each system shall properly install and operate throughout its distribution system the optimal corrosion control treatment designated by the Department under subparagraph (d) of this paragraph.
(f) Department review of treatment and specification of optimal water quality control parameters. The Department shall evaluate the results of all lead and copper tap samples and water quality parameter samples submitted by the water system and determine whether the system has properly installed and operated the optimal corrosion control treatment designated by the Department in subparagraph (d) of this paragraph. Upon reviewing the results of tap water and water quality parameter monitoring by the system, both before and after the system installs optimal corrosion control treatment, the Department shall designate at least the following:
1. A minimum value or a range of values for pH measured at each entry point to the distribution system;
2. A minimum pH value, measured in all tap samples. Such value shall be equal to or greater than 7.0, unless the Department determines that meeting a pH level of 7.0 is not technologically feasible or is not necessary for the system to optimize corrosion control;
3. If a corrosion inhibitor is used, a minimum concentration or a range of concentrations for the inhibitor, measured at each entry point to the distribution system and in all tap samples, that the Department determines is necessary to form a passivating film on the interior walls of the pipes of the distribution system;
4. If alkalinity is adjusted as part of optimal corrosion control treatment, a minimum concentration or a range of concentrations for alkalinity, measured at each entry point to the distribution system and in all tap samples;
5. If calcium carbonate stabilization is used as part of corrosion control, a minimum concentration or a range of concentrations for calcium, measured in all tap samples.

The values for the applicable water quality control parameters listed in this subparagraph shall be those that the Department determines to reflect optimal corrosion control treatment for the system. The Department may designate values for additional water quality control parameters determined by the Department to reflect optimal corrosion control for the system. The Department shall notify the system in writing of these determinations and explain the basis for its decisions.

(g) Continued operation and monitoring. All systems optimizing corrosion control shall continue to operate and maintain optimal corrosion control treatment, including maintaining water quality parameters at or above minimum values or within ranges designated by the Department under subparagraph (f) of this paragraph for all samples collected under subparagraphs (8)(d) through (f) of this rule. Compliance with the requirements of this paragraph shall be determined every six months, as specified by subparagraph (8)(d) of this rule. A water system is out of compliance with the requirements of this paragraph for a six-month period if it has excursions for any Department-specified parameter on more than nine days during the period. An excursion occurs whenever the daily value for one or more of the water quality parameters measured at a sampling location is below the minimum value or outside the range designated by the Department. Daily values are calculated as follows (the Department has the discretion to delete results of obvious sampling errors from this calculation):
1. On days when more than one measurement for the water quality parameter is collected at the sampling location, the daily value shall be the average of all results collected during the day regardless of whether they are collected through continuous monitoring, grab sampling, or a combination of both. If EPA has approved an alternative formula under 40 CFR 142.16 in the Department's application for a program revision submitted pursuant to 40 CFR 142.12, the Department's formula shall be used to aggregate multiple measurements taken at a sampling point for the water quality parameter in lieu of the formula in this subparagraph.
2. On days when only one measurement for the water quality parameter is collected at the sampling location, the daily value shall be the result of that measurement.
3. On days when no measurement is collected for the water quality parameter at the sampling location, the daily value shall be the daily value calculated on the most recent day on which the water quality parameter was measured at the sample site.
(h) Modification of Department treatment decisions. Upon its own initiative or in response to a request by a water system, the Department may modify its determination of the optimal corrosion control treatment under subparagraph (d) of this paragraph or optimal water quality control parameters under subparagraph (f) of this paragraph. A request for modification by a system or other interested party shall be in writing, explain why the modification is appropriate, and provide supporting documentation. The Department may modify its determination where it concludes that such change is necessary to ensure that the system continues to optimize corrosion control treatment. A revised determination shall be made in writing, set forth the new treatment requirements, explain the basis for the Department's decision, and provide an implementation schedule for completing the treatment modifications.
(4) Source water treatment requirements. Systems shall complete the applicable source water monitoring and treatment requirements by the following deadlines.
(a) Deadlines for Completing Source Water Treatment Steps:
1. Step 1: A system exceeding the lead or copper action level shall complete lead and copper source water monitoring and make a treatment recommendation to the Department not later than 180 days after the end of the monitoring period during which the lead or copper action level was exceeded.
2. Step 2: The Department shall make a determination regarding source water treatment within 6 months after submission of monitoring results under step 1.
3. Step 3: If the Department requires installation of source water treatment the system shall install the treatment within 24 months after completion of step 2.
4. Step 4: The system shall complete follow-up tap water monitoring and source water monitoring within 36 months after completion of step 2.
5. Step 5: The Department shall review the system's installation and operation of source water treatment and specify maximum permissible source water levels within 6 months after completion of step 4.
6. Step 6: The system shall continue thereafter to operate in compliance with the Department-specified maximum permissible lead and copper source water levels and continue source water monitoring in accordance with part (9)(d)4. of this rule.
(b) Description of Source Water Treatment Requirements:
1. System treatment recommendation. Any system which exceeds the lead or copper action level shall recommend in writing to the Department the installation and operation of one of the source water treatments listed in part 2. of this subparagraph. A system may recommend that no treatment be installed based upon a demonstration that source water treatment is not necessary to minimize lead and copper levels at users' taps.
2. Department determination regarding source water treatment. The Department shall complete an evaluation of the results of all source water samples submitted by the water system to determine whether source water treatment is necessary to minimize lead or copper levels in water delivered to users' taps. If the Department determines, based on source water levels of lead and copper, that treatment is needed, the Department shall either require installation and operation of the source water treatment recommended by the system (if any) or require the installation and operation of another source water treatment from among the following: ion exchange, reverse osmosis, lime softening or coagulation/filtration. If the Department requests additional information to aid in its review, the water system shall provide the information by the date specified by the Department in its request. The Department shall notify the system in writing of its determination and set forth the basis for its decision.
3. Installation of source water treatment. Each system shall properly install and operate the source water treatment designated by the Department under part 2. of this subparagraph.
4. Department review of source water treatment and specification of maximum permissible source water levels. The Department shall review the source water samples taken by the water system both before and after the system installs source water treatment, and determine whether the system has properly installed and operated the source water treatment designated by the Department. Based upon its review, the Department shall designate the maximum permissible lead and copper concentrations for finished water entering the distribution system. Such levels shall reflect the contaminant removal capability of the treatment properly operated and maintained. The Department shall notify the system in writing and explain the basis for its decision.
5. Continued operation and maintenance. Each water system shall maintain lead and copper levels below the maximum permissible concentrations designated by the Department at each sampling point monitored. The system is out of compliance if the level of lead or copper at any sampling is greater than the maximum permissible concentration designated by the Department.
6. Modification of Department treatment decisions. Upon its own initiative or in response to a request by a water system, the Department may modify its determination of the source water treatment under part 2. of this subparagraph, or maximum permissible lead and copper concentrations for finished water entering the distribution system under part 4. of this subparagraph. A request for modification by a system shall be in writing, explain why the modification is appropriate, and provide supporting documentation. The Department may modify its determination where it concludes that such change is necessary to ensure that the system continues to minimize lead and copper concentrations in source water. A revised determination shall be made in writing, set forth the new treatment requirements, explain the basis for the Department's decision, and provide an implementation schedule for completing the treatment modifications.
7. Treatment decisions by EPA in lieu of the Department. The EPA Regional Administrator may review treatment determinations made by a Department under parts 2., 4., or 6. of this subparagraph and issue Federal treatment determinations consistent with the requirements of those parts where the Administrator finds that:
(i) The Department has failed to issue a treatment determination by the applicable deadlines contained in subparagraph (a) of this paragraph,
(ii) The Department has abused its discretion in a substantial number of cases or in cases affecting a substantial population, or
(iii) The technical aspects of a Department's determination would be indefensible in an expected Federal enforcement action taken against a system.
(5) Lead service line replacement requirements.
(a) Systems that fail to meet the lead action level in tap samples, after installing corrosion control and/or source water treatment, shall replace lead service lines in accordance with the requirements of this paragraph. If a system is in violation of the rules or Act for failure to install source water or corrosion control treatment, the Department may require the system to commence lead service line replacement under this paragraph after the date by which the system was required to conduct monitoring under part (7)(d)2. of this rule has passed.
(b) A water system shall replace annually at least 7 percent of the initial number of lead service lines in its distribution system. The initial number of lead service lines is the number of lead lines in place at the time the replacement program begins. The system shall identify the initial number of lead service lines in its distribution system, including an identification of the portion(s) owned by the system, based on a materials evaluation, including the evaluation required under subparagraph (7)(a) of this rule and relevant legal authorities (e.g., contracts, local ordinances) regarding the portion owned by the system. The first year of lead service line replacement shall begin on the first day following the end of the monitoring period in which the action level was exceeded in subparagraph (a) of this paragraph.
1. If monitoring is required annually or less frequently, the end of the monitoring period is September 30 of the calendar year in which the sampling occurs. If the Department has established an alternate monitoring period, then the end of the monitoring period will be the last day of that period.
2. Any water system resuming a lead service line replacement program after the cessation of its lead service line replacement program as allowed by subparagraph (f) of this paragraph shall update its inventory of lead service lines to include those sites that were previously determined not to require replacement through the sampling provision under subparagraph (c) of this paragraph. The system will then divide the updated number of remaining lead service lines by the number of remaining years in the program to determine the number of lines that must be replaced per year (7 percent lead service line replacement is based on a 15-year replacement program, so, for example, systems resuming lead service line replacement after previously conducting two years of replacement would divide the updated inventory by 13). For those systems that have completed a 15-year lead service line replacement program, the Department will determine a schedule for replacing or retesting lines that were previously tested out under the replacement program when the system re-exceeds the action level.
(c) A system is not required to replace an individual lead service line if the lead concentration in all service line samples from that line, taken pursuant to part (7)(b)3 of this rule, is less than or equal to 0.015 mg/l.
(d) A water system shall replace that portion of the lead service line that it owns. In cases where the system does not own the entire lead service line, the system shall notify the owner of the line, or the owner's authorized agent, that the system will replace the portion of the service line that it owns and shall offer to replace the owner's portion of the line. A system is not required to bear the cost of replacing the privately-owned portion of the line, nor is it required to replace the privately-owned portion where the owner chooses not to pay the cost of replacing the privately-owned portion of the line, or where replacing the privately-owned portion would be precluded by State, local or common law. A water system that does not replace the entire length of the service line also shall complete the following tasks.
1. At least 45 days prior to commencing with the partial replacement of a lead service line, the water system shall provide notice to the resident(s) of all buildings served by the line explaining that they may experience a temporary increase of lead levels in their drinking water, along with guidance on measures consumers can take to minimize their exposure to lead. The Department may allow the water system to provide notice under the previous sentence less than 45 days prior to commencing partial lead service line replacement where such replacement is in conjunction with emergency repairs. In addition, the water system shall inform the resident(s) served by the line that the system will, at the system's expense, collect a sample from each partially-replaced lead service line that is representative of the water in the service line for analysis of lead content, as prescribed under part (7)(b)3. of this rule, within 72 hours after the completion of the partial replacement of the service line. The system shall collect the sample and report the results of the analysis to the owner and the resident(s) served by the line within three business days of receiving the results. Mailed notices post- marked within three business days of receiving the results shall be considered "on time."
2. The water system shall provide the information required by part 1. of this subparagraph to the residents of individual dwellings by mail or by other methods approved by the Department. In instances where multi-family dwellings are served by the line, the water system shall have the option to post the information at a conspicuous location.
(e) The Department shall require a system to replace lead service lines on a shorter schedule than that required by this paragraph, taking into account the number of lead service lines in the system, where such shorter replacement schedule is feasible. The Department shall make this determination in writing and notify the system of its finding within 6 months after the system is triggered into lead service line replacement based on monitoring referenced in subparagraph (a) of this paragraph.
(f) Any system may cease replacing lead service lines whenever first draw samples collected pursuant to part (7)(b)2. of this rule meets the lead action level during each of two consecutive monitoring periods and the system submits the results to the Department. If the first draw samples in any such water system thereafter exceeds the lead action level, the system shall recommence replacing lead service lines, pursuant to subparagraph (b) in this paragraph; and
(g) To demonstrate compliance with subparagraphs (a) through (d) of this paragraph, a system shall report to the Department the information specified in subparagraph (11)(e) of this rule.
(6) Public education and supplemental monitoring requirements.

All water systems must deliver a consumer notice of lead tap water monitoring results to persons served by the water system at sites that are tested, as specified in subparagraph (e) of this paragraph. A water system that exceeds the lead action level based on tap water samples collected in accordance with paragraph (7) of this rule shall deliver to its customers the public education materials contained in subparagraph (a) of this paragraph in accordance with the requirements of subparagraph (c) of this paragraph. Water systems that exceed the lead action level must sample the tap water of any customer who requests it in accordance with subparagraph (d) of this paragraph.

(a) Content of written public education materials.
1. Community water systems and Non-transient non-community water systems. Water systems must include the following elements in printed materials (e.g., brochures and pamphlets) in the same order as listed below. In addition, language in subparts (i), (ii) and (vi) of this part must be included in the materials, exactly as written, except for the text in brackets in these subparts for which the water system must include system-specific information. Any additional information presented by a water system must be consistent with the information in this part and be in plain language that can be understood by the general public. Water systems must submit all written public education materials to the Department prior to delivery. The Department may require the system to obtain approval of the content of written public materials prior to delivery.
(i) Important Information About Lead in Your Drinking Water. [Insert Name of Water System] found elevated levels of lead in drinking water in some homes/buildings. Lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Please read this information closely to see what you can do to reduce lead in your drinking water.
(ii) Health effects of lead. Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources. It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body. The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women. Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children. Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults. Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother's bones, which may affect brain development.
(iii) Sources of Lead
(I) Explain what lead is.
(II) Explain possible sources of lead in drinking water and how lead enters drinking water. Include information on home/building plumbing materials and service lines that may contain lead.
(III) Discuss other important sources of lead exposure in addition to drinking water (e.g., paint).
(iv) Discuss the steps the consumer can take to reduce their exposure to lead in drinking water.
(I) Encourage running the water to flush out the lead.
(II) Explain concerns with using hot water from the tap and specifically caution against the use of hot water for preparing baby formula.
(III) Explain that boiling water does not reduce lead levels.
(IV) Discuss other options consumers can take to reduce their exposure to lead in drinking water, such as alternative sources or treatment of drinking water.
(V) Suggest that parents have their child's blood tested for lead. The following is a list of some Department approved laboratories in your area that you can call to have your water tested for lead (Insert names and phones numbers of at least two laboratories).
(v) The steps described above will reduce the lead concentrations in your drinking water. However, if a water test indicates that the drinking water coming from your tap contains lead concentrations in excess of 15 ppb after flushing, or after we have completed our actions to minimize lead levels, then you may want to take the following additional measures:
(I) Purchase or lease a home treatment device. Home treatment devices are limited in that each unit treats only the water that flows from the faucet to which it is connected, and all of the devices require periodic maintenance and replacement. Devices such as reverse osmosis systems or distillers can effectively remove lead from your drinking water. Some activated carbon filters may reduce lead levels at the tap, however all lead reduction claims should be investigated. Be sure to check the actual performance of a specific home treatment device before and after installing the unit.
(II) Purchase bottled water for drinking and cooking.
(vi) You can consult a variety of sources for additional information. Your family doctor or pediatrician can perform a blood test for lead and provide you with information about the health effects of lead. State and local government agencies that can be contacted include:
(I) (insert the name of city or county department of public utilities) at (insert phone number) can provide you with information about your community's water supply, and a list of local laboratories that have been certified by EPA for testing water quality;
(II) (insert the name of the city or county department that issues building permits (at insert telephone number) can provide you with information about building permit records that should contain the name of plumbing contractors that plumbed your home; and
(III) (insert the name of the State Department of Public Health) at (insert phone number) or the (insert the name of the city or county health department) at (insert phone number) can provide you with information about the health effects of lead and how you can have your child's blood tested.
(vii) The following is a list of some Department approved laboratories in your area that you can call to have your water tested for lead (Insert names and phones numbers of at least two laboratories).
(viii) Explain why there are elevated levels of lead in the system's drinking water (if known) and what the water system is doing to reduce the lead levels in homes/buildings in this area.
(ix) For more information call us at [Insert Your Number] [(If Applicable), or visit our Web site at [Insert Your Web Site Here]]. For more information on reducing lead exposure around your home/building and the health effects of lead, visit EPA's Web site at http://www.epa.gov/lead or contact your health care provider.
2. Community water systems. In addition to including the elements specified in part (a)1 of this paragraph, community water systems must:
(i) Tell consumers how to get their water tested.
(ii) Discuss lead in plumbing components and the difference between low lead and lead free.
(b) Reserved
(c) Delivery of a public education materials.
1. For public water systems serving a large proportion of non-English speaking consumers, as determined by the Department, the public education materials must contain information in the appropriate language(s) regarding the importance of the notice or contain a telephone number or address where persons served may contact the water system to obtain a translated copy of the public education materials or to request assistance in the appropriate language.
2. A community water system that exceeds the lead action level on the basis of tap water samples collected in accordance with paragraph (7) of this rule, and that is not already conducting public education tasks under this subparagraph, must conduct the public education tasks under this subparagraph within 60 days after the end of the monitoring period in which the exceedance occurred:
(i) Deliver printed materials meeting the content requirements of subparagraph (a) of this paragraph to all bill paying customers.
(ii) Contact of customers most at risk.
(I) Contact customers who are most at risk by delivering education materials that meet the content requirements of subparagraph (a) of this paragraph to local public health agencies even if they are not located within the water system's service area, along with an informational notice that encourages distribution to all the organization's potentially affected customers or community water system's users. The water system must contact the local public health agencies directly by phone or in person. The local public health agencies may provide a specific list of additional community based organizations serving target populations, which may include organizations outside the service area of the water system. If such lists are provided, systems must deliver education materials that meet the content requirements of subparagraph (a) of this paragraph to all organizations on the provided lists.
(II) Contact customers who are most at risk by delivering materials that meet the content requirements of subparagraph (a) of this paragraph to the following organizations listed in subitems I. through VI. of this item that are located within the water system's service area, along with an informational notice that encourages distribution to all the organization's potentially affected customers or community water system's users:
I. Public and private schools or school boards.
II. Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and Head Start programs.
III. Public and private hospitals and medical clinics.
IV. Pediatricians.
V. Family planning clinics.
VI. Local welfare agencies.
(III) Make a good faith effort to locate the following organizations within the service area and deliver materials that meet the content requirements of subparagraph (a) of this paragraph to them, along with an informational notice that encourages distribution to all potentially affected customers or users. The good faith effort to contact at-risk customers may include requesting a specific contact list of these organizations from the local public health agencies, even if the agencies are not located within the water system's service area:
I. Licensed childcare centers
II. Public and private preschools.
III. Obstetricians-Gynecologists and Midwives.
(iii) No less often than quarterly, provide information on or in each water bill as long as the system exceeds the action level for lead. The message on the water bill must include the following statement exactly as written except for the text in brackets for which the water system must include system-specific information: [Insert Name of Water System] found high levels of lead in drinking water in some homes. Lead can cause serious health problems. For more information please call [Insert Name of Water System] [or visit (Insert Your Web Site Here)]. The message or delivery mechanism can be modified in consultation with the Department; specifically, the Department may allow a separate mailing of public education materials to customers if the water system cannot place the information on water bills.
(iv) Post material meeting the content requirements of subparagraph (a) of this paragraph on the water system's Web site if the system serves a population greater than 100,000.
(v) Submit a press release to newspaper, television and radio stations.
(vi) In addition to subparts (i) through (v) of this part, systems must implement at least three activities from one or more categories listed below. The educational content and selection of these activities must be determined in consultation with the Department.
(I) Public Service Announcements.
(II) Paid advertisements.
(III) Public Area Informational Displays.
(IV) E-mails to customers.
(V) Public Meetings.
(VI) Household Deliveries.
(VII) Targeted Individual Customer Contact.
(VIII) Direct material distribution to all multi-family homes and institutions.
(IX) Other methods approved by the Department.
(vii) For systems that are required to conduct monitoring annually or less frequently, the end of the monitoring period is September 30 of the calendar year in which the sampling occurs, or, if the Department has established an alternate monitoring period, the last day of that period.
3. As long as a community water system exceeds the action level, it must repeat the activities pursuant to part 2. of this subparagraph as described in subparts (i) through (iv) of this part.
(i) A community water system shall repeat the tasks contained in subparts 2.(i), (ii) and (vi) of this subparagraph every 12 months.
(ii) A community water system shall repeat tasks contained in subpart 2(iii) of this subparagraph with each billing cycle.
(iii) A community water system serving a population greater than 100,000 shall post and retain material on a publicly accessible Web site pursuant to subpart 2.(iv) of this subparagraph.
(iv) The community water system shall repeat the task in subpart 2.(v) of this subparagraph twice every 12 months on a schedule agreed upon with the Department. The Department can allow activities in part 2. of this subparagraph to extend beyond the 60-day requirement if needed for implementation purposes on a case-by-case basis; however, this extension must be approved in writing by the Department in advance of the 60-day deadline.
4. Within 60 days after the end of the monitoring period in which the exceedance occurred (unless it already is repeating public education tasks pursuant to part 5. of this subparagraph), a non-transient noncommunity water system shall deliver the public education materials specified by subparagraph (a) of this paragraph as follows:
(i) Post informational posters on lead in drinking water in a public place or common area in each of the buildings served by the system; and
(ii) Distribute informational pamphlets and/or brochures on lead in drinking water to each person served by the non-transient non-community water system. The Department may allow the system to utilize electronic transmission in lieu of or combined with printed materials as long as it achieves at least the same coverage.
(iii) For systems that are required to conduct monitoring annually or less frequently, the end of the monitoring period is September 30 of the calendar year in which the sampling occurs, or, if the Department has established an alternate monitoring period, the last day of that period.
5. A non-transient non-community water system shall repeat the tasks contained in part 4 of this subparagraph at least once during each calendar year in which the system exceeds the lead action level. The Department can allow activities in part 4 of this subparagraph to extend beyond the 60-day requirement if needed for implementation purposes on a case-by-case basis; however, this extension must be approved in writing by the Department in advance of the 60-day deadline.
6. A water system may discontinue delivery of public education materials if the system has met the lead action level during the most recent six-month monitoring period conducted pursuant to paragraph (7) of this rule. The system shall recommence public education in accordance with this paragraph if it subsequently exceeds the lead action level during any monitoring period.
7. A community water system may apply to the Department, in writing, (unless the Department has waived the requirement for prior Department approval) to use only the text specified in part (a)1. of this paragraph in lieu of the text in parts (a)1. and (a)2. of this paragraph and to perform the tasks listed in parts 4. and 5. of this subparagraph in lieu of the tasks in parts 2. and 3. of this subparagraph if:
(i) The system is a facility, such as a prison or a hospital, where the population served is not capable of or is prevented from making improvements to plumbing or installing point of use treatment devices; and
(ii) The system provides water as part of the cost of services provided and does not separately charge for water consumption.
8. A community water system serving 3,300 or fewer people may limit certain aspects of their public education programs as follows:
(i) With respect to the requirements of subpart 2.(vi) of this subparagraph, a system serving 3,300 or fewer must implement at least one of the activities listed in that subpart.
(ii) With respect to the requirements of subpart 2.(ii) of this subparagraph, a system serving 3,300 or fewer people may limit the distribution of the public education materials required under that subparagraph to facilities and organizations served by the system that are most likely to be visited regularly by pregnant women and children.
(iii) With respect to the requirements of subpart 2.(v) of this subparagraph, the Department may waive this requirement for systems serving 3,300 or fewer persons as long as system distributes notices to every household served by the system.
(d) Supplemental monitoring and notification of results.

A water system that fails to meet the lead action level on the basis of tap samples collected in accordance with paragraph (7) of this rule shall offer to sample the tap water of any customer who requests it. The system is not required to pay for collecting or analyzing the sample, nor is the system required to collect and analyze the sample itself.

(e) Notification of results.
1. Reporting requirement. All water systems must provide a notice of the individual tap results from lead tap water monitoring carried out under the requirements of paragraph (7) of this rule to the persons served by the water system at the specific sampling site from which the sample was taken (e.g., the occupants of the residence where the tap was tested).
2. Timing of notification. A water system must provide the consumer notice as soon as practical, but no later than 30 days after the system learns of the tap monitoring results.
3. Content. The consumer notice must include the results of lead tap water monitoring for the tap that was tested, an explanation of the health effects of lead, list steps consumers can take to reduce exposure to lead in drinking water and contact information for the water utility. The notice must also provide the maximum contaminant level goal and the action level for lead and the definitions for these two terms from Rule 0400-45-01-.35.
4. Delivery. The consumer notice must be provided to persons served at the tap that was tested, either by mail or by another method approved by the Department. For example, upon approval by the Department, a non-transient non-community water system could post the results on a bulletin board in the facility to allow users to review the information. The system must provide the notice to customers at sample taps tested, including consumers who do not receive water bills.
(7) Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in tap water.
(a) Sample site location.
1. By the applicable date for commencement of monitoring under part (d)1. of this paragraph, each water system shall identify a pool of sampling sites that meets the requirements of this paragraph, and which is sufficiently large to ensure that the water system can collect the number of lead and copper tap samples required in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph. All sites from which first draw samples are collected shall be selected from this pool of sampling sites. Sampling sites may not include faucets that have point-of-use or point-of-entry treatment devices designed to remove inorganic contaminants.
2. A public water system shall review at least the information on lead, copper, and galvanized steel under paragraph (1) of Rule 0400-45-01-.21 when conducting a materials evaluation. When an evaluation of the information collected pursuant to paragraph (1) of Rule 0400-45-01-.21 is insufficient to locate the requisite number of lead and copper sampling sites that meet the targeting criteria in subparagraph (a) of this paragraph, the water system shall review at least the sources of information listed below in order to identify a sufficient number of sampling sites. In addition, the system shall seek to collect such information in the course of its normal operations (e.g., checking service line materials when reading water meters or performing maintenance activities):
(i) All plumbing codes, permits, and records in the files of the building department(s) which indicate the plumbing materials that are installed within publicly and privately owned structures connected to the distribution system;
(ii) All inspections and records of the distribution system that indicate the material composition of the service connections that connect a structure to the distribution system; and
(iii) All existing water quality information, which includes the results of all prior analyses of the system or individual structures connected to the system, indicating locations that may be particularly susceptible to high lead or copper concentrations.
3. Community water systems shall use tier 1 sampling sites for monitoring for lead and copper action level determination. Tier 1 sampling sites for a community water system shall consist of single family structures that:
(i) Contain copper pipes with lead solder installed after 1982 or contain lead pipes; and/or
(ii) Are served by a lead service line. When multiple-family residences comprise at least 20 percent of the structures served by a water system, the system may include these types of structure in its sampling pool.
4. Any community water system with insufficient tier 1 sampling sites shall use "tier 2 sampling sites", which consists of buildings, including multiple-family residences that:
(i) Contain copper pipes with lead solder installed after 1982 or contain lead pipes; and/or
(ii) Are served by a lead service line.
5. Any community water system with insufficient tier 1 and tier 2 sampling sites shall complete its sampling pool with "tier 3 sampling sites", consisting of single family structures that contain copper pipes with lead solder installed before 1983. A community water system with insufficient tier 1, tier 2, and tier 3 sampling sites shall complete its sampling pool with representative sites throughout the distribution system. For the purpose of this paragraph, a representative site is a site in which the plumbing materials used at that site would be commonly found at other sites served by the water system.
6. Non-transient non-community water systems shall use tier 1 sampling sites for lead and copper. The sampling sites selected for a non-transient non-community water system ("tier 1 sampling sites") shall consist of buildings that:
(i) Contain copper pipes with lead solder installed after 1982 or contain lead pipes; and/or
(ii) Are served by a lead service line.
7. A non-transient non-community water system with insufficient tier 1 sites that meet the targeting criteria in part 6. of this subparagraph shall complete its sampling pool with sampling sites that contain copper pipes with lead solder installed before 1983. If additional sites are needed to complete the sampling pool, the non-transient non-community water system shall use representative sites throughout the distribution system. For the purpose of this paragraph, a representative site is a site in which the plumbing materials used at that site would be commonly found at other sites served by the water system.
8. Any water system whose distribution system contains lead service lines shall draw 50 percent of the samples it collects during each monitoring period from sites that contain lead pipes, or copper pipes with lead solder, and 50 percent of the samples from sites served by a lead service line. A water system that cannot identify a sufficient number of sampling sites served by a lead service line shall collect first-draw samples from all of the sites identified as being served by such lines.
(b) Sample collection methods.
1. All tap samples for lead and copper collected in accordance with this rule, with the exception of lead service line samples collected under subparagraph (5)(c) of this rule and samples collected under part 5. of this subparagraph, shall be first-draw samples.
2. Each first-draw tap sample for lead and copper shall be one liter in volume and have stood motionless in the plumbing system of each sampling site for at least six hours. First-draw samples from residential housing shall be collected from the cold water kitchen tap or bathroom sink tap. First-draw samples from a nonresidential building shall be one liter in volume and shall be collected at an interior tap from which water is typically drawn for consumption. Non-first-draw samples collected in lieu of first-draw samples pursuant to part 5. of this subparagraph shall be one liter in volume and shall be collected at an interior tap from which water is typically drawn for consumption. First-draw samples may be collected by the system or the system may allow residents to collect first-draw samples after instructing the residents of the sampling procedures specified in this subparagraph. To avoid problems of residents handling nitric acid, acidification of first-draw samples may be done up to 14 days after the sample is collected. After acidification to resolubilize the metals, the sample must stand in the original container for the time specified in the approved EPA method before the sample can be analyzed. If a system allows residents to perform sampling, the system may not challenge, based on alleged errors in sample collection, the accuracy of sampling results.
3. Each lead service line sample shall be one liter in volume and have stood motionless in the lead service line for at least six hours. Lead service line samples shall be collected in one of the following three ways:
(i) At the tap after flushing the volume of water between the tap and the lead service line. The volume of water shall be calculated based on the interior diameter and length of the pipe between the tap and lead service line;
(ii) Tapping directly into the lead service line.
(iii) If the sampling site is a building constructed as a single-family residence, allowing the water to run until there is a significant change in temperature which would be indicative of water that has been standing in the lead service line.
4. A water system shall collect each first draw tap sample from the same sampling site from which it collected the previous sample. If, for any reason, the water system cannot gain entry to a sampling site in order to collect a follow-up tap sample, the system may collect the follow-up tap sample from another sampling site in its sampling pool as long as the new site meets the same targeting criteria, and is within reasonable proximity of the original site.
5. A non-transient non-community water system, or a community water system that meets the criteria of subparts (6)(c)7.(i) and (ii) of this rule, that does not have enough taps that can supply first-draw samples, as defined in Rule 0400-45-01-.04, may apply to the Department in writing to substitute non-first-draw samples. Such systems must collect as many first-draw samples from appropriate taps as possible and identify sampling times and locations that would likely result in the longest standing time for the remaining sites. The Department has the discretion to waive the requirement for prior Department approval of non-first-draw sample sites selected by the system, either through Department regulation or written notification to the system.
(c) Number of samples. Water systems shall collect at least one sample during each monitoring period specified in subparagraph (d) of this paragraph from the number of sites listed in the first column ("standard monitoring") of the table in this subparagraph. A system conducting reduced monitoring under part (d)4. of this paragraph shall collect at least one sample from the number of sites specified in the second column ("reduced monitoring") of the table in this paragraph during each monitoring period specified in part (d)4. of this paragraph. Such reduced monitoring sites shall be representative of the sites required for standard monitoring. A public water system that has fewer than five drinking water taps, that can be used for human consumption meeting the sample site criteria of subparagraph (a) of this paragraph to reach the required number of sample sites listed in this subparagraph, must collect at least one sample from each tap and then must collect additional samples from those taps on different days during the monitoring period to meet the required number of sites. Alternatively, the Department may allow these public water systems to collect a number of samples less than the number of sites specified in this subparagraph, provided that 100 percent of all taps that can be used for human consumption are sampled. The Department must approve this reduction of the minimum number of samples in writing based on a request from the system or onsite verification by the Department. The Department may specify sampling locations when a system is conducting reduced monitoring. The table is as follows:

TABLE 0400-45-01-.33(7)(c)

System size (number of People served)

1

Number of sites (standard monitoring)

Number of sites (reduced monitoring)

>100,000

100

50

10,001 to 100,000

60

30

3,301 to 10,000

40

20

501 to 3,300

20

10

101 to 500

10

5

less than or equal to 100

5

5

1 Populations shall be determined by count of the population served or by the household factor multiplied by the number of connections the system has as determined by the latest federal census. Water systems serving multi-family residences such as apartment complexes and mobile home parks shall include each individual residence unit as a connection in determining the population for the system.

(d) Timing of Monitoring
1. Initial tap sampling. The first six-month monitoring period for small, medium-size and large systems shall begin on the following dates:

TABLE 0400-45-01-.33(7)(d) 1.

System size (No. People served)1

First six- month monitoring period begins on

>50,000

January 1, 1992

3,301 to 50,000

July 1, 1992

less than or equal to 3,300

July 1, 1993

1 Populations shall be determined by count of the population served or by the household factor multiplied by the number of connections the system has as determined by the latest federal census. Water systems serving multi-family residences such as apartment complexes and mobile home parks shall include each individual residence unit as a connection in determining the population for the system.

(i) All large systems shall monitor for at least two consecutive six-month periods; and
(ii) All small and medium-size systems shall monitor during each six-month monitoring period until:
(I) The system exceeds the lead or copper action level and is therefore required to implement the corrosion control treatment requirements under paragraph (2) of this rule, in which case the system shall continue monitoring in accordance with part 2. of this subparagraph, or
(II) The system meets the lead or copper action levels during two consecutive six-month monitoring periods, in which case the system may reduce monitoring in accordance with part 4. of this subparagraph.
2. Monitoring after installation of corrosion control and source water treatment.
(i) Any large system which installs optimal corrosion control treatment pursuant to part (2)(d)4. of this rule shall monitor for at least two consecutive six-month monitoring periods by the date specified in part (2)(d)5. of this rule by January 1, 1998.
(ii) Any small or medium-size system which installs optimal corrosion control treatment pursuant to part (2)(e)5. of this rule shall monitor for at least two consecutive six-month monitoring periods by the date specified in part (2)(e)6. of this rule.
(iii) Any system which installs source water treatment pursuant to part (4)(a)3. of this rule shall monitor for at least two consecutive six-month monitoring periods by the date specified in part (4)(a)4. of this rule.
3. Monitoring after the Department specifies water quality parameter values for optimal corrosion control. After the Department specifies the values for water quality control parameters pursuant to subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule, the system shall monitor during each subsequent six-month monitoring period, with the first monitoring period to begin on the date the Department specifies the optimal values pursuant to subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule.
4. Reduced Monitoring
(i) A small or medium-size water system that meets the lead and copper action levels during each of two consecutive six-month monitoring periods may reduce the number of samples in accordance with subparagraph (c) of this paragraph and reduce the frequency of sampling to once per year. A small or medium water system collecting fewer than five samples as specified in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph, that meets the lead and copper action levels during each of two consecutive six-month monitoring periods may reduce the frequency of sampling to once per year. In no case can the system reduce the number of samples required below the minimum of one sample per available tap. This sampling shall begin during the calendar year immediately following the end of the second consecutive six-month monitoring period.
(ii) Any water system that meets the lead action level and maintains the range of values for the water quality control parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control treatment specified by the Department under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule during each of two consecutive six-month monitoring periods may reduce the frequency of monitoring to once per year and reduce the number of lead and copper samples in accordance with subparagraph (c) of this paragraph if it receives written approval from the Department. This sampling shall begin during the calendar year immediately following the end of the second consecutive six-month monitoring period. The Department shall review monitoring, treatment, and other relevant information submitted by the water system in accordance with paragraph (11) of this rule, and shall notify the system in writing when it determines the system is eligible to commence reduced monitoring pursuant to this paragraph. The Department shall review, and where appropriate, revise its determination when the system submits new monitoring or treatment data, or when other data relevant to the number and frequency of tap sampling becomes available.
(iii) A small or medium-size water system that meets the lead and copper action levels during three consecutive years of monitoring may reduce the frequency of monitoring for lead and copper from annually to once every three years. Any water system that meets the lead action level and maintains the range of values for the water quality control parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control treatment specified by the Department under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule during three consecutive years of monitoring may reduce the frequency of monitoring from annually to once every three years if it receives written approval from the Department. Samples collected once every three years shall be collected no later than every third calendar year. The Department shall review monitoring, treatment, and other relevant information submitted by the water system in accordance with paragraph (11) of this rule, and shall notify the system in writing when it determines the system is eligible to reduce the frequency of monitoring to once every three years. The Department shall review, and where appropriate, revise its determination when the system submits new monitoring or treatment data, or when other data relevant to the number and frequency of tap sampling becomes available.
(iv) A water system that reduces the number and frequency of sampling shall collect these samples from representative sites included in the pool of targeted sampling sites identified in subparagraph (a) of this paragraph. Systems sampling annually or less frequently shall conduct the lead and copper tap sampling during the months of June, July, August, or September unless the Department has approved a different sampling period in accordance with item (I) of this subpart.
(I) The Department may approve a different period for conducting the lead and copper tap sampling for systems collecting a reduced number of samples. Such a period shall be no longer than four consecutive months and must represent a time of normal operation where the highest levels of lead are most likely to occur. For a non-transient non-community water system that does not operate during the months of June through September, and for which the period of normal operation where the highest levels of lead are most likely to occur is not known, the Department shall designate a period that represents a time of normal operation for the system. This sampling shall begin during the period approved or designated by the Department in the calendar year immediately following the end of the second consecutive six-month monitoring period for systems initiating annual monitoring and during the three-year period following the end of the third consecutive calendar year of annual monitoring for systems initiating triennial monitoring.
(II) Systems monitoring annually, that have been collecting samples during the months of June through September and that receive Department approval to alter their sample collection period under item (I) of this subpart, must collect their next round of samples during a time period that ends no later than 21 months after the previous round of sampling. Systems monitoring triennially that have been collecting samples during the months of June through September, and receive Department approval to alter the sampling collection period as per item (I) of this subpart, must collect their next round of samples during a time period that ends no later than 45 months after the previous round of sampling. Subsequent rounds of sampling must be collected annually or triennially, as required by this section. Small systems with waivers, granted pursuant to subparagraph (g) of this paragraph, that have been collecting samples during the months of June through September and receive Department approval to alter their sample collection period under item (I) of this subpart must collect their next round of samples before the end of the 9-year period.
(v) Any water system that demonstrates for two consecutive 6-month monitoring periods that the tap water lead level computed under part (1)(c)3. of this rule is less than or equal to 0.005 mg/L and the tap water copper level computed under part (1)(c)3. of this rule is less than or equal to 0.65 mg/L may reduce the number of samples in accordance with subparagraph (c) of this paragraph and reduce the frequency of sampling to once every three calendar years.
(vi)
(I) A small or medium-size water system subject to reduced monitoring that exceeds the lead or copper action level shall resume sampling in accordance with part 3. of this subparagraph and collect the number of samples specified for standard monitoring under subparagraph (c) of this paragraph. Such a system shall also conduct water quality parameter monitoring in accordance with subparagraph (8)(b), (c) or (d) of this rule (as appropriate) during the monitoring period in which it exceeded the action level. Any such system may resume annual monitoring for lead and copper at the tap at the reduced number of sites specified in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph after it has completed two subsequent consecutive six-month rounds of monitoring that meet the criteria of subpart (i) of this part and/or may resume triennial monitoring for lead and copper at the reduced number of sites after it demonstrates through subsequent rounds of monitoring that it meets the criteria of either subpart (iii) or (v) of this part.
(II) Any water system subject to the reduced monitoring frequency that fails to meet the lead action level during any four-month monitoring period or that fails to operate at or above the minimum value or within the range of values for the water quality parameters specified by the Department under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule for more than nine days in any six-month period specified in subparagraph (8)(d) of this rule shall conduct tap water sampling for lead and copper at the frequency specified in part 3. of this subparagraph, collect the number of samples specified for standard monitoring under subparagraph (c) of this paragraph, and shall resume monitoring for water quality parameters within the distribution system in accordance with subparagraph (8)(d) of this rule. This standard tap water sampling shall begin no later than the six-month period beginning January 1 of the calendar year following the lead action level exceedance or water quality parameter excursion. Such a system may resume reduced monitoring for lead and copper at the tap and for water quality parameters within the distribution system under the following conditions:
I. The system may resume annual monitoring for lead and copper at the tap at the reduced number of sites specified in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph after it has completed two subsequent six-month rounds of monitoring that meet the criteria of subpart (ii) of this part and the system has received written approval from the Department that it is appropriate to resume reduced monitoring on an annual frequency. This sampling shall begin during the calendar year immediately following the end of the second consecutive six month monitoring period.
II. The system may resume triennial monitoring for lead and copper at the tap at the reduced number of sites after it demonstrates through subsequent rounds of monitoring that it meets the criteria of either subpart (iii) or (v) of this part and the system has received written approval from the Department that it is appropriate to resume triennial monitoring.
III. The system may reduce the number of water quality parameter tap water samples required in accordance with part (8)(e)1. of this rule and the frequency with which it collects such samples in accordance with part (8)(e)2. of this rule. Such a system may not resume triennial monitoring for water quality parameters at the tap until it demonstrates, in accordance with the requirements of part (8)(e)2. of this rule, that it has re-qualified for triennial monitoring.
(vii) Any water system subject to a reduced monitoring frequency under this part shall notify the Department in writing in accordance with part (11)(a)3. of this rule of any upcoming long term change in treatment or addition of a new source as described in part (11)(a)3. of this rule. The Department must review and approve the addition of a new source or long-term change in water treatment before it is implemented by the water system. The Department may require the system to resume sampling in accordance with part 3. of this subparagraph and collect the number of samples specified for standard monitoring under subparagraph (c) of this paragraph or take other appropriate steps such as increased water quality parameter monitoring or reevaluation of its corrosion control treatment given the potentially different water quality considerations.
(e) Additional monitoring by systems. The results of any monitoring conducted in addition to the minimum requirements of this paragraph shall be considered by the system and may be considered by the Department in making any determinations (i.e., calculating the 90th percentile lead or copper level) under this rule.
(f) Invalidation of lead or copper tap water samples. A sample invalidated under this subparagraph does not count toward determining lead or copper 90th percentile levels under subparagraph (1)(c) of this rule or toward meeting the minimum monitoring requirements of subparagraph (c) of this paragraph.
1. The Department may invalidate a lead or copper tap water sample at least if one of the following conditions is met.
(i) The laboratory establishes that improper sample analysis caused erroneous results.
(ii) The Department determines that the sample was taken from a site that did not meet the site selection criteria of this paragraph.
(iii) The sample container was damaged in transit.
(iv) There is substantial reason to believe that the sample was subject to tampering.
2. The system must report the results of all samples to the Department and all supporting documentation for samples the system believes should be invalidated.
3. To invalidate a sample under part 1. of this subparagraph, the decision and the rationale for the decision must be documented in writing. The Department may not invalidate a sample solely on the grounds that a follow-up sample result is higher or lower than that of the original sample.
4. The water system must collect replacement samples for any samples invalidated under this subparagraph if, after the invalidation of one or more samples, the system has too few samples to meet the minimum requirements of subparagraph (c) of this paragraph. Any such replacement samples must be taken as soon as possible, but no later than 20 days after the date the Department invalidates the sample or by the end of the applicable monitoring period, whichever occurs later. Replacement samples taken after the end of the applicable monitoring period shall not also be used to meet the monitoring requirements of a subsequent monitoring period. The replacement samples shall be taken at the same locations as the invalidated samples or, if that is not possible, at locations other than those already used for sampling during the monitoring period.
(g) Monitoring waivers for small systems. Any small system serving fewer than 3300 persons that meets the criteria of this paragraph may apply to the Department to reduce the frequency of monitoring for lead and copper under this paragraph to once every nine years (i.e., a "full waiver") if it meets all of the materials criteria specified in part 1. of this subparagraph and all of the monitoring criteria specified in part 2. of this subparagraph. Any small system that meets the criteria in parts 1. and 2. of this subparagraph only for lead, or only for copper, may apply to the Department for a waiver to reduce the frequency of tap water monitoring to once every nine years for that contaminant only (i.e., a "partial waiver").
1. Materials criteria. The system must demonstrate that its distribution system and service lines and all drinking water supply plumbing, including plumbing conveying drinking water within all residences and buildings connected to the system, are free of lead- containing materials and/or copper-containing materials, as those terms are defined in this rule, as follows:
(i) Lead. To qualify for a full waiver, or a waiver of the tap water monitoring requirements for lead (i.e., a "lead waiver"), the water system must provide certification and supporting documentation to the Department that the system is free of all lead-containing materials, as follows:
(I) It contains no plastic pipes which contain lead plasticizers, or plastic service lines which contain lead plasticizers; and
(II) It is free of lead service lines, lead pipes, lead soldered pipe joints, and leaded brass or bronze alloy fittings and fixtures, unless such fittings and fixtures meet the specifications of any standard established pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 300g-6(e) [SDWA section 1417(e)].
(ii) Copper. To qualify for a full waiver, or a waiver of the tap water monitoring requirements for copper (i.e., a "copper waiver"), the water system must provide certification and supporting documentation to the Department that the system contains no copper pipes or copper service lines.
2. Monitoring criteria for waiver issuance. The system must have completed at least one 6-month round of standard tap water monitoring for lead and copper at sites approved by the Department and from the number of sites required by subparagraph (c) of this paragraph and demonstrate that the 90th percentile levels for any and all rounds of monitoring conducted since the system became free of all lead-containing and/or copper-containing materials, as appropriate, meet the following criteria.
(i) Lead levels. To qualify for a full waiver, or a lead waiver, the system must demonstrate that the 90th percentile lead level does not exceed 0.005 mg/L.
(ii) Copper levels. To qualify for a full waiver, or a copper waiver, the system must demonstrate that the 90th percentile copper level does not exceed 0.65 mg/L.
3. Department approval of waiver application. The Department shall notify the system of its waiver determination, in writing, setting forth the basis of its decision and any condition of the waiver. As a condition of the waiver, the Department may require the system to perform specific activities (e.g., limited monitoring, periodic outreach to customers to remind them to avoid installation of materials that might void the waiver) to avoid the risk of lead or copper concentration of concern in tap water. The small system must continue monitoring for lead and copper at the tap as required by parts (d)1. through (d)4. of this paragraph, as appropriate, until it receives written notification from the Department that the waiver has been approved.
4. Monitoring frequency for systems with waivers.
(i) A system with a full waiver must conduct tap water monitoring for lead and copper in accordance with subpart (d)4.(iv) of this paragraph at the reduced number of sampling sites identified in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph at least once every nine years and provide the materials certification specified in part 1. of this subparagraph for both lead and copper to the Department along with the monitoring results. Samples collected every nine years shall be collected no later than every ninth calendar year.
(ii) A system with a partial waiver must conduct tap water monitoring for the waived contaminant in accordance with subpart (d)4.(iv) of this paragraph at the reduced number of sampling sites specified in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph at least once every nine years and provide the materials certification specified in part 1. of this subparagraph pertaining to the waived contaminant along with the monitoring results. Such a system also must continue to monitor for the non-waived contaminant in accordance with requirements of parts (d)1. through 4. of this paragraph, as appropriate.
(iii) Any water system with a full or partial waiver shall notify the Department in writing in accordance with part (11)(a)3. of this rule of any upcoming long-term change in treatment or addition of a new source, as described in that paragraph. The Department must review and approve the addition of a new source or long-term change in water treatment before it is implemented by the water system. The Department has the authority to require the system to add or modify waiver conditions (e.g., require recertification that the system is free of lead-containing and/or copper-containing materials, require additional round(s) of monitoring), if it deems such modifications are necessary to address treatment or source water changes at the system.
(iv) If a system with a full or partial waiver becomes aware that it is no longer free of lead-containing or copper-containing materials, as appropriate, (e.g., as a result of new construction or repairs), the system shall notify the Department in writing no later than 60 days after becoming aware of such a change.
5. Continued eligibility. If the system continues to satisfy the requirements of part 4. of this subparagraph, the waiver will be renewed automatically, unless any of the conditions listed in subparts (i) through (iii) of this part occurs. A system whose waiver has been revoked may re-apply for a waiver at such time as it again meets the appropriate materials and monitoring criteria of parts 1. and 2. of this subparagraph.
(i) A system with a full waiver or a lead waiver no longer satisfies the materials criteria of subpart 1.(i) of this subparagraph or has a 90th percentile lead level greater than 0.005 mg/L.
(ii) A system with a full waiver or a copper waiver no longer satisfies the materials criteria of subpart 1.(ii) of this subparagraph or has a 90th percentile copper level greater than 0.65 mg/L.
(iii) The Department notifies the system, in writing, that the waiver has been revoked, setting forth the basis of its decision.
6. Requirements following waiver revocation. A system whose full or partial waiver has been revoked by the Department is subject to the corrosion control treatment and lead and copper tap water monitoring requirements, as follows:
(i) If the system exceeds the lead and/or copper action level, the system must implement corrosion control treatment in accordance with the deadlines specified in subparagraph (2)(e) of this rule, and any other applicable requirements of of this rule.
(ii) If the system meets both the lead and the copper action level, the system must monitor for lead and copper at the tap no less frequently than once every three years using the reduced number of sample sites specified in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph.
7. Pre-existing waivers. Small system waivers approved by the Department in writing prior to April 11, 2000 shall remain in effect under the following conditions:
(i) If the system has demonstrated that it is both free of lead-containing and copper-containing materials, as required by part 1. of this subparagraph and that its 90th percentile lead levels and 90th percentile copper levels meet the criteria of part 2. of this subparagraph, the waiver remains in effect so long as the system continues to meet the waiver eligibility criteria of part 5. of this subparagraph. The first round of tap water monitoring conducted pursuant to part 4. of this subparagraph shall be completed no later than nine years after the last time the system has monitored for lead and copper at the tap.
(ii) If the system has met the materials criteria of part 1. of this subparagraph but has not met the monitoring criteria of part 2. of this subparagraph, the system shall conduct a round of monitoring for lead and copper at the tap demonstrating that it meets the criteria of part 2. of this subparagraph no later than September 30, 2000, or the effective date of this rule whichever is later. Thereafter, the waiver shall remain in effect as long as the system meets the continued eligibility criteria of part 5. of this subparagraph. The first round of tap water monitoring conducted pursuant to part 4. of this subparagraph shall be completed no later than nine years after the round of monitoring conducted pursuant to part 2. of this subparagraph.
(8) Monitoring requirements for water quality parameters.

All large water systems and all small and medium-size systems that exceed the lead or copper action level shall monitor water quality parameters in addition to lead and copper in accordance with this paragraph. The requirements of this paragraph are summarized in the table at the end of this paragraph.

(a) General Requirements.
1. Sample Collection Methods.
(i) Tap samples shall be representative of water quality throughout the distribution system taking into account the number of persons served, the different sources of water, the different treatment methods employed by the system, and seasonal variability. Tap sampling under this subpart is not required to be conducted at taps targeted for lead and copper sampling pursuant to subparagraph (7)(a) of this rule. (Note: Systems may find it convenient to conduct tap sampling for water quality parameters at sites used for coliform sampling).
(ii) Samples collected at the entry point(s) to the distribution system shall be from locations representative of each source after treatment. If a system draws water from more than one source and the sources are combined before distribution, the system must sample at an entry point to the distribution system during periods of normal operating conditions (i.e., when water is representative of all sources being used).
2. Number of samples.
(i) Systems shall collect two tap samples for applicable water quality parameters during each monitoring period specified under subparagraphs (b) through (e) of this paragraph from the following number of sites.

TABLE 0400-45-01-.33(8)(a) 2.(i)

System size (No. People served)

No. of sites for water quality parameters

>100,000..........

25

10,001-100,000.........

10

3,301 to 10,000........

3

501 to 3,300..........

2

101 to 500..........

1

[LESS THAN EQAUL TO]100............

1

(ii) Except as provided in part (c)3. of this paragraph, systems shall collect two samples for each applicable water quality parameter at each entry point to the distribution system during each monitoring period specified in subparagraph (b) of this paragraph.
(b) Initial Sampling. All large water systems shall measure the applicable water quality parameters as specified in part 1. of this subparagraph at taps and at each entry point to the distribution system during each six-month monitoring period specified in part (7)(d)1. of this rule. All small and medium size systems shall measure the applicable water quality parameters at the locations specified in parts 1. and 2. of this subparagraph during each six-month monitoring period specified in part (7)(d)1. of this rule during which the system exceeds the lead or copper action level.
1. Water Quality Parameters for Monitoring at Taps:
(i) pH;
(ii) Alkalinity;
(iii) Orthophosphate, when an inhibitor containing a phosphate compound is used;
(iv) Silica, when an inhibitor containing a silicate compound is used;
(v) Calcium;
(vi) Conductivity;
(vii) Water temperature; and
(viii) Other parameters as specified by the Department.
2. At each entry point to the distribution system: all of the applicable parameters listed in part 1. of this subparagraph.
(c) Monitoring after Installation of corrosion control. Any large system which installs optimal corrosion control treatment pursuant to part (2)(d)4. of this rule shall measure the water quality parameters at the locations and frequencies specified in parts 1., 2. and 3. of this subparagraph during each six-month monitoring period specified in subpart (7)(d)2.(i) of this rule. Any small or medium-size system which installs optimal corrosion control treatment shall conduct such monitoring during each six-month monitoring period specified in subpart (7)(d)2.(ii) of this rule in which the system exceeds the lead or copper action level.
1. Water Quality Parameters for Monitoring at Taps, two samples for:
(i) pH;
(ii) Alkalinity;
(iii) Orthophosphate, when an inhibitor containing a phosphate compound is used;
(iv) Silica, when an inhibitor containing a silicate compound is used;
(v) Calcium, when calcium carbonate stabilization is used as part of corrosion control; and
(vi) Other parameters as specified by the Department.
2. Except as provided in part 3. of this subparagraph, at each entry point to the distribution system, at least one sample no less frequently than every two weeks (biweekly) for:
(i) pH;
(ii) When alkalinity is adjusted as part of optimal corrosion control, a reading of the dosage rate of the chemical used to adjust alkalinity, and the alkalinity concentration; and
(iii) When a corrosion inhibitor is used as part of optimal corrosion control, a reading of the dosage rate of the inhibitor used, and the concentration of orthophosphate or silica (whichever is applicable).
(iv) Other parameters as specified by the Department.
3. Any ground water system can limit entry point sampling described in part 2. of this subparagraph to those entry points that are representative of water quality and treatment conditions throughout the system. If water from untreated ground water sources mixes with water from treated ground water sources, the system must monitor for water quality parameters both at representative entry points receiving treatment and representative entry points receiving no treatment. Prior to the start of any monitoring under this subparagraph, the system shall provide to the Department written information identifying the selected entry points and documentation, including information on seasonal variability, sufficient to demonstrate that the sites are representative of water quality and treatment conditions throughout the system.
(d) Monitoring after the Department specifies water quality parameter values for optimal corrosion control. After the Department specifies the values for applicable water quality control parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control treatment under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule, all large systems shall measure the applicable water quality parameters in accordance with subparagraph (c) of this paragraph and determine compliance with the requirements of subparagraph (3)(g) of this rule every six months with the first six-month period to begin either January 1 or July 1, whichever comes first, after the Department specifies the optimal values under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule. Any small or medium-size system shall conduct such monitoring during each six-month period specified in this subparagraph in which the system exceeds the lead or copper action level. For any such small and medium-size system that is subject to a reduced monitoring frequency pursuant to part (7)(d)4. of this rule at the time of the action level exceedance, the start of the applicable six-month period under this subparagraph shall coincide with the start of the applicable monitoring period under part (7)(d)4. of this rule. Compliance with Department-designated optimal water quality parameter values shall be determined as specified under subparagraph (3)(g) of this rule.
(e) Reduced monitoring.
1. Any water system that maintains the range of values for the water quality parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control treatment during each of two consecutive six-month monitoring periods under subparagraph (d) of this paragraph shall continue monitoring at the entry point(s) to the distribution system as specified in part (c)2. of this paragraph. The system may collect two tap samples for applicable water quality parameters from the following reduced number of sites during each six-month monitoring period, if it qualifies for and requests reduced tap monitoring for water quality parameters.

TABLE 0400-45-01-.33(8)(e) 1.

System size (No. People served)

No. of sites for water quality parameters

>100,000.............

10

10,001-100,000.........

7

3,301 to 10,000..........

3

501 to 3,300............

2

101 to 500............

1

[LESS THAN EQAUL TO]100..............

1

2.
(i) Any water system that maintains the range of values for the water quality parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control treatment specified by the Department under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule during three consecutive years of monitoring may reduce the frequency with which it collects the number of tap samples for applicable water quality parameters specified in part 1 of this subparagraph from every six months to annually. This sampling begins during the calendar year immediately following the end of the monitoring period in which the third consecutive year of six-month monitoring occurs. Any water system that maintains the range of values for water quality parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control treatment specified by the Department under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule during three consecutive years of annual monitoring under this paragraph may reduce the frequency with which it collects the number of tap samples for applicable water quality parameters specified in part 1. of this subparagraph from annually to every three years. This sampling begins no later than the third calendar year following the end of the monitoring period in which the third consecutive year of monitoring occurs.
(ii) A water system may reduce the frequency with which it collects tap samples for applicable water quality parameters specified in part 1. of this subparagraph to every three years if it demonstrates during two consecutive monitoring periods that its tap water lead level at the 90th percentile is less than or equal to the PQL for lead specified in subparagraph (10)(e) of Rule 0400-45-01-.14, that its tap water copper level at the 90th percentile is less than or equal to 0.65 mg/L for copper in part (1)(c)2. of this rule, and that it also has maintained the range of values for the water quality parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control treatment specified by the Department under subparagraph (3)(f) of this rule. Monitoring conducted every three years shall be done no later than every third calendar year.
3. A water system that conducts sampling annually shall collect these samples throughout the year so as to reflect seasonal variability as per this subparagraph.
4. Any water system subject to the reduced monitoring frequency that fails to operate at or above the minimum value or within the range of values for the water quality parameters specified by the Department in subparagraph (3)(f) for more than nine days in any six-month period specified in subparagraph (3)(g) shall resume distribution system tap water sampling in accordance with the number and frequency requirements in subparagraph (d) of this paragraph. Such a system may resume annual monitoring for water quality parameters at the tap at the reduced number of sites specified in part 1. of this subparagraph after it has completed two subsequent consecutive six-month rounds of monitoring that meet the criteria of of part 1. of this subparagraph and/or may resume triennial monitoring for water quality parameters at the tap at the reduced number of sites after it demonstrates through subsequent rounds of monitoring that it meets the criteria of either subpart 2.(i) or (ii) of this subparagraph.
(f) Additional monitoring by systems. The results of any monitoring conducted in addition to the minimum requirements of this paragraph shall be considered by the system and may be considered by the Department in making any determinations (i.e., determining concentrations of water quality parameters) under this paragraph or paragraph (3) of this rule.

TABLE 0400-45-01-.33(8)(f)

SUMMARY OF MONITORING REQUIREMENTS FOR WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS1

Monitoring Period

Parameters2

Location

Frequency

Initial Monitoring

pH, alkalinity, orthophosphate,

or silica3

calcium, or conductivity, temperature

Taps and at entry point(s) to distribution system

Every 6 months

After Installation of Corrosion Control

pH, alkalinity,

orthophosphate, or silica3

calcium4

Taps

Every 6 months

pH, alkalinity dosage rate and concentration (if alkalinity adjusted as part of corrosion control) inhibitor dosage rate and inhibitor residual5

Entry point(s ) to distribution system

No less frequently than every two weeks

After Department Specifies Parameter Values for Optimal Corrosion Control

pH, alkalinity , 3

orthophosphate or silica , calcium 4

Entry point(s) to distribution system

Every 6 months

pH, alkalinity dosage rate and concentration ( if alkalinity adjusted as part of corrosion control ) inhibitor dosage rate andinhibitor residual5

Entry point(s) to distribution system

No less frequently than every two

weeks.

Reduced Monitoring

pH, alkalinity , 3 , orthophosphate or silica calcium 4

Taps

Every 6 months , annually 7 ,or every 3 years 8 reduced number of sites

pH, alkalinity dosage rate and concentration ( if alkalinity adjusted as part of corrosion control) inhibitor dosage rate andinhibitor residual5

Entry point(s) to distribution system

No less frequently than every two

weeks.

1 table is for illustrative purposes; consult the text of this section for precise regulatory requirements.

2 Small and medium-size systems have to monitor for water quality parameters only during monitoring periods in which the system exceeds the lead or copper action level.

3 Orthophosphate must be measured only when an inhibitor containing a phosphate compound is used. Silica must be measured only when an inhibitor containing silicate compound is used.

4 Calcium must be measured only when calcium carbonate stabilization is used as part of corrosion control.

5 Inhibitor dosage rates and inhibitor residual concentrations (orthophosphate or silica) must be measured only when an inhibitor is used.

6 Ground water systems may limit monitoring to representative locations throughout the system.

7 Water systems may reduce frequency of monitoring for water quality parameters at the tap from every six months to annually if they have maintained the range of values for water quality parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control during 3 consecutive years of monitoring.

8 Water systems may further reduce the frequency of monitoring for water quality parameters at the tap from annually to once every 3 years if they have maintained the range of values for water quality parameters reflecting optimal corrosion control during 3 consecutive years of annual monitoring. Water systems may accelerate to triennial monitoring for water quality parameters at the tap if they have maintained 90th percentile lead levels less than or equal to 0.005 mg/L, 90th percentile copper levels less than or equal to 0.65 mg/L, and the range of water quality parameters designated by the Department under paragraph (3)(f) as representing optimal corrosion control during two consecutive six-month monitoring periods.

(9) Monitoring requirements for lead and copper in source water.
(a) Sample location, collection methods, and number of samples.
1. A water system that fails to meet the lead or copper action level on the basis of tap samples collected in accordance with paragraph (7) of this rule shall collect lead and copper source water samples in accordance with the following requirements regarding sample location, number of samples, and collection methods:
(i) Groundwater systems shall take a minimum of one sample at every entry point to the distribution system which is representative of each well after treatment (hereafter called a sampling point). The system shall take one sample at the same sampling point unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of each source or treatment plant.
(ii) Surface water systems shall take a minimum of one sample at every entry point to the distribution system after any application of treatment or in the distribution system at a point which is representative of each source after treatment (hereafter called a sampling point). The system shall take each sample at the same sampling point unless conditions make another sampling point more representative of each source or treatment plant.

Note: For the purposes of this subpart, surface water systems include systems with a combination of surface and ground sources.

(iii) If a system draws water from more than one source and the sources are combined before distribution, the system must sample at an entry point to the distribution system during periods of normal operating conditions (i.e., when water is representative of all sources being used).
(iv) The Department may reduce the total number of samples which must be analyzed by allowing the use of compositing. Compositing of samples must be done by certified laboratory personnel. Composite samples from a maximum of five samples are allowed, provided that if the lead concentration in the composite sample is greater than or equal to 0.001 mg/L or the copper concentration is greater than or equal to 0.160 mg/L, then either:
(I) A follow-up sample shall be taken and analyzed within 14 days at each sampling point included in the composite; or
(II) If duplicates of or sufficient quantities from the original samples from each sampling point used in the composite are available, the system may use these instead of resampling.
2. Where the results of sampling indicate an exceedance of maximum permissible source water levels established under part (4)(b)4. of this rule, one confirmation sample shall be collected as soon as possible after the initial sample was taken (but not to exceed two weeks) at the same sampling point. If a required confirmation sample is taken for lead or copper, then the results of the initial and confirmation sample shall be averaged in determining compliance with the Department-specified maximum permissible level. Any sample value below the detection limit shall be considered to be zero. Any value above the detection limit, but below the practical quantitation limit (PQL), as set forth in subparagraph (10)(d) of Rule 0400-45-01-.14, shall either be considered as the measured value or be considered one-half the PQL.
(b) Monitoring frequency after system exceeds tap water action level. Any system which exceeds the lead or copper action level at the tap shall collect one source water sample from each entry point to the distribution system no later than six months after the end of the monitoring period during which the lead or copper action level was exceeded. For monitoring periods that are annual or less frequent, the end of the monitoring period is September 30 of the calendar year in which the sampling occurs, or if the Department has established an alternate monitoring period, the last day of that period.
(c) Monitoring frequency after installation of source water treatment. Any system which installs source water treatment pursuant to part (4)(a)3. of this rule shall collect an additional source water sample from each entry point to the distribution system during two consecutive six-month monitoring periods by the deadline specified in part (4)(a)4. of this rule.
(d) Monitoring frequency after the Department specifies maximum permissible source water levels or determines that source water treatment is not needed.
1. A system shall monitor at the frequency specified in subpart (i) or (ii) of this part in cases where the Department specifies maximum permissible source water levels pursuant to part (4)(b)4. of this rule or determines that the system is not required to install source water treatment pursuant to part (4)(b)2. of this rule.
(i) A water system using only groundwater shall collect samples once during the three-year compliance period in effect when the applicable Department determination under part 1. of this subparagraph is made. Such systems shall collect samples once during each subsequent compliance period. Triennial samples shall be collected every third calendar year.
(ii) A water system using surface water (or a combination of surface water and ground water) shall collect samples once during each calendar year, the first annual monitoring period to begin during the year in which the applicable Department determination is made under part 1. of this subparagraph.
2. A system is not required to conduct source water sampling for lead and/or copper if the system meets the action level for the specific contaminant in tap water samples during the entire source water sampling period applicable to the system under subpart 1.(i) or (ii) of this subparagraph.
(e) Reduced monitoring frequency.
1. A water system using only ground water may reduce the monitoring frequency for lead and copper in source water to once during each nine-year compliance cycle provided that the samples are collected no later than every ninth calendar year and if the system meets one of the following criteria:
(i) The system demonstrates that finished drinking water entering the distribution system has been maintained below the maximum permissible lead and copper concentrations specified by the Department in part (4)(b)4. of this rule during at least three consecutive compliance periods under part (d)1. of this paragraph, or
(ii) The Department has determined that source water treatment is not needed and the system demonstrates that, during at least three consecutive compliance periods in which sampling was conducted under part (d)1. of this paragraph, the concentration of lead in source water was less than or equal to 0.005 mg/L and the concentration of copper in source water was less than or equal to 0.65 mg/L.
2. A water system using surface water (or a combination of surface water and ground water) may reduce the monitoring frequency in part (d)1. of this paragraph to once during each nine-year compliance cycle provided that the samples are collected no later than every ninth calendar year and if the system meets one of the following criteria:
(i) The system demonstrates that finished drinking water entering the distribution system has been maintained below the maximum permissible lead and copper concentrations specified by the Department in part (4)(b)4. of this rule for at least three consecutive years; or
(ii) The Department has determined that source water treatment is not needed and the system demonstrates that, during at least three consecutive years, the concentration of lead in source water was less than or equal to 0.005 mg/L and the concentration of copper in source water was less than or equal to 0.65 mg/L.
3. A water system that uses a new source of water is not eligible for reduced monitoring for lead and/or copper until concentrations in samples collected from the new source during three consecutive monitoring periods are below the maximum permissible lead and copper concentrations specified by the Department in part (4)(a)5. of this rule.
(10) Reserved
(11) Reporting requirements. All water systems shall report all of the following information to the Department in accordance with this paragraph.
(a) Reporting requirements for tap water monitoring for lead and copper and for water quality parameter monitoring.
1. Except as provided in subpart (viii) of this part, a water system shall report the information specified subparts (i) through (viii) of this part for all tap water samples specified in paragraph (7) of this rule and for all water quality parameter samples specified in paragraph (8) of this rule within the first 10 days following the end of each applicable monitoring period specified in paragraphs (7) and (8) of this rule (i.e., every six months, annually, every 3 years, or every 9 years). For monitoring periods with a duration less than six months, the end of the monitoring period is the last date samples can be collected during that period as specified in paragraphs (7) and (8) of this rule.
(i) The results of all tap samples for lead and copper including the location of each site and criteria under parts (7)(a)3., 4., 5., 6. and/or 7. of this rule, under which the site was selected for the system's sampling pool;
(ii) Documentation for each tap water lead or copper sample for which the water system requests invalidation pursuant to part (7)(f)2. of this rule;
(iii) [Reserved];
(iv) The 90th percentile lead and copper concentrations measured from among all lead and copper tap water samples collected during each monitoring period calculated in accordance with part (1)(c)3. of this rule, unless the Department calculates the system's 90th percentile lead and copper levels under subparagraph (h) of this paragraph;
(v) With the exception of initial tap sampling conducted pursuant to part (7)(d)1. of this rule, the system shall designate any site which was not sampled during previous monitoring periods, and include an explanation of why sampling sites have changed;
(vi) The results of all tap samples for pH, and where applicable, alkalinity, calcium, conductivity, temperature, and orthophosphate or silica collected pursuant to subparagraphs (8)(b) through (e) of this rule; and
(vii) The results of all samples collected at the entry point(s) to the distribution system for applicable water quality parameters under subparagraphs (8)(b) through (e) of this rule;
(viii) A water system shall report the results of all water quality parameter samples collected under subparagraphs (8)(c) through (f) of this rule during each six-month monitoring period specified in subparagraph (8)(d) of this rule within the first 10 days following the end of the monitoring period unless the Department has specified a more frequent reporting requirement.
2. For a non-transient non-community water system, or a community water system meeting the criteria of subparts (6)(c)7.(i) and (ii) of this rule, that does not have enough taps that can provide first-draw samples, the system must either:
(i) Provide written documentation to the Department identifying standing times and locations for enough non-first-draw samples to make up its sampling pool under part (7)(b)5. of this rule by the start of the first applicable monitoring period under paragraph (7)(d) of this rule that commences after April 11, 2000, unless the Department has waived prior Department approval of non-first-draw sample sites selected by the system pursuant to part (7)(b)5. of this rule; or
(ii) If the Department has waived prior approval of non-first-draw sample sites selected by the system, identify, in writing, each site that did not meet the six-hour minimum standing time and the length of standing time for that particular substitute sample collected pursuant to part (7)(b)5. of this rule and include this information with the lead and copper tap sample results required to be submitted pursuant to subpart 1.(i) of this subparagraph.
3. At a time specified by the Department, or if no specific time is designated by the Department then as early as possible prior to the addition of a new source or any change in water treatment, a water system deemed to have optimized corrosion control under part (2)(b)3. of this rule, a water system subject to reduced monitoring pursuant to part (7)(d)4. of this rule, or a water system subject to a monitoring waiver pursuant to subparagraph (7)(g) of this rule, shall submit written documentation to the Department describing the change or addition. The Department must review and approve the addition of a new source or long-term change in treatment before it is implemented by the water system. Examples of long-term treatment changes include the addition of a new treatment process or modification of an existing treatment process. Examples of modifications include switching secondary disinfectants, switching coagulants (e.g., alum to ferric chloride), and switching corrosion inhibitor products (e.g., orthophosphate to blended phosphate). Long-term changes can include dose changes to existing chemicals if the system is planning long-term changes to its finished water pH or residual inhibitor concentration. Long-term treatment changes would not include chemical dose fluctuations associated with daily raw water quality changes.
4. Any small system applying for a monitoring waiver under subparagraph (7)(g) of this rule, or subject to a waiver granted pursuant to part (7)(g)3. of this rule, shall provide the following information to the Department in writing by the specified deadline:
(i) By the start of the first applicable monitoring period in subparagraph (7)(d) of this rule, any small water system applying for a monitoring waiver shall provide the documentation required to demonstrate that it meets the waiver criteria of parts (7)(g)1. and 2. of this rule.
(ii) No later than nine years after the monitoring previously conducted pursuant to part (7)(g)2. or subpart (7)(g)4.(i) of this rule, each small system desiring to maintain its monitoring waiver shall provide the information required by subparts (7)(g)4.(i) and (ii) of this rule.
(iii) No later than 60 days after it becomes aware that it is no longer free of lead-containing and/or copper-containing material, as appropriate, each small system with a monitoring waiver shall provide written notification to the Department, setting forth the circumstances resulting in the lead-containing and/or copper-containing materials being introduced into the system and what corrective action, if any, the system plans to remove these materials.
(iv) By October 10, 2000, any small system with a waiver granted prior to April 11, 2000 and that has not previously met the requirements of part (7)(g)2. of this rule shall provide the information required by that part.
5. Each ground water system that limits water quality parameter monitoring to a subset of entry points under part (8)(c)3. of this rule shall provide, by the commencement of such monitoring, written correspondence to the Department that identifies the selected entry points and includes information sufficient to demonstrate that the sites are representative of water quality and treatment conditions throughout the system.
(b) Source water monitoring reporting requirements.
1. A water system shall report the sampling results for all source water samples collected in accordance with paragraph (9) of this rule within the first 10 days following the end of each source water monitoring period (i.e., annually, per compliance period, per compliance cycle) specified in paragraph (9) of this rule.
2. With the exception of the first round of source water sampling conducted pursuant to subparagraph (9)(b) of this rule, the system shall specify any entry point which was not sampled during previous monitoring periods and include an explanation of why the sampling point has changed.
(c) Corrosion control treatment reporting requirements. By the applicable dates under paragraph (2) of this rule, systems shall report the following information:
1. For systems demonstrating that they have already optimized corrosion control, information required pursuant to part (2)(b)2. or 3. of this rule;
2. For systems required to optimize corrosion control, their recommendation regarding optimal corrosion control treatments pursuant to subparagraph (3)(a) of this rule;
3. For systems required to evaluate the effectiveness of corrosion control treatments pursuant to subparagraph (3)(c) of this rule, the information required by that subparagraph; and
4. For systems required to install optimal corrosion control designated by the Department pursuant to subparagraph (3)(d) of this rule, a letter certifying that the system has completed installing that treatment.
(d) Source water treatment reporting requirements. By the applicable dates pursuant to paragraph (4) of this rule, systems shall provide the following information to the Department:
1. If required under part (4)(b)1. of this rule, their recommendation regarding source water treatment;
2. For systems required to install source water treatment pursuant to part (4)(b)2. of this rule, a letter certifying that the system has completed installing the treatment designated by the Department within 24 months after the Department designated the treatment.
(e) Lead service line replacement reporting requirements. A system shall report the following information to the Department to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of paragraph (5) of this rule:
1. No later than 12 months after the end of the monitoring period in which a system exceeds the lead action level in sampling referred to in subparagraph (5)(a) of this rule, the system must submit written documentation to the Department of the material evaluation conducted as required in subparagraph (7)(a) of this rule, identify the initial number of lead service lines in its distribution system at the time the system exceeds the lead action level and provide the system's schedule for annually replacing at least 7 percent of the initial number of lead service lines in its distribution system.
2. No later than 12 months after the end of the monitoring period in which a system exceeds the lead action level in sampling pursuant to subparagraph (5)(a) of this rule, and every 12 months thereafter, the system shall demonstrate to the Department in writing that the system has either:
(i) Replaced in the previous 12 months at least 7 percent of the initial lead service lines (or a greater number of lines specified by the Department pursuant to subparagraph (5)(e) of this rule in its distribution system); or
(ii) Conducted sampling which demonstrates that the lead concentration in all service line samples from an individual line(s), taken pursuant to part (7)(b)3. of this rule is less than or equal to 0.015 mg/L. In such cases, the total number of lines replaced and/or which meet the criteria in subparagraph (5)(c) of this rule shall equal at least 7 percent of the initial number of lead lines identified under part 1. of this subparagraph (or the percentage specified by the Department under subparagraph (5)(e) of this rule).
3. The annual writing submitted to the Department under part 2. of this subparagraph shall contain the following information:
(i) The number of lead service lines scheduled to be replaced during the previous year of the system's replacement schedule;
(ii) The number and location of each lead service line replaced during the previous year of the system's replacement schedule; and
(iii) If water samples are collected, the water lead concentration and location of each lead service line sampled, the sampling method, and the date of sampling.
4. Any system which collects lead service line samples following partial lead service line replacement required by paragraph (5) of this rule shall report the results to the Department within the first ten days of the month following the month in which the system receives the laboratory results, or as specified by the Department. The Department, at its discretion, may eliminate this requirement to report these monitoring results. Systems shall also report any additional information as specified by the Department, and in a time and manner prescribed by the Department, to verify that all partial lead service line replacement activities have taken place.
(f) Public education program reporting requirements.
1. Any water system that is subject to the public education requirements in paragraph (6) of this rule shall, within ten days after the end of each period in which the system is required to perform public education tasks in accordance with subparagraph (6)(c) of this rule, send written documentation to the Department that contains:
(i) A demonstration that the system has delivered the public education materials that meet the content requirements in subparagraphs (6)(a) and (b) of this rule and the delivery requirements in subparagraph (6)(c) of this rule; and
(ii) A list of all the newspapers, radio stations, television stations, and facilities and organizations to which the system delivered public education materials during the period in which the system was required to perform public education tasks.
2. Unless required by the Department, a system that previously has submitted the information required by subpart 1.(ii) of this subparagraph need not resubmit the information required by subpart 1.(ii) of this subparagraph, as long as there have been no changes in the distribution list and the system certifies that the public education materials were distributed to the same list submitted previously.
3. No later than 3 months following the end of the monitoring period, each system must mail a sample copy of the consumer notification of tap results to the Department along with a certification that the notification has been distributed in a manner consistent with the requirements of subparagraph (6)(e) of this rule.
(g) Reporting of additional monitoring data. Any system which collects sampling data in addition to that required by the lead and copper control regulations shall report the results to the Department by the end of the applicable monitoring period under paragraphs (7), (8) and (9) of this rule during which the samples are collected.
(h) Reporting of 90th percentile lead and copper concentrations where the Department calculates a system's 90th percentile concentrations. A water system is not required to report the 90th percentile lead and copper concentrations measured from among all lead and copper tap water samples collected during each monitoring period, as required by subpart (a)1.(iv) of this paragraph if:
1. The Department has previously notified the water system that it will calculate the water system's 90th percentile lead and copper concentrations, based on the lead and copper tap results submitted pursuant to subpart 2.(i) of this subparagraph, and has specified a date before the end of the applicable monitoring period by which the system must provide the results of lead and copper tap water samples;
2. The system has provided the following information to the Department by the date specified in part 1. of this subparagraph:
(i) The results of all tap samples for lead and copper including the location of each site and the criteria under parts (7)(a)3., 4., 5., 6. and/or 7. of this rule under which the site was selected for the system's sampling pool, pursuant to subpart (a)1.(i) of this paragraph; and
(ii) An identification of sampling sites utilized during the current monitoring period that were not sampled during previous monitoring periods, and an explanation why sampling sites have changed; and
3. The Department has provided the results of the 90th percentile lead and copper calculations, in writing, to the water system before the end of the monitoring period.
(12) Recordkeeping requirements. Any system subject to the requirements of this rule shall retain on its premises original records of all sampling data and analyses, reports, surveys, letters, evaluations, schedules, Department determinations, and any other information required by paragraphs (2) through (9) of this rule. Each water system shall retain the records required by this paragraph for no fewer than 12 years.

Notes

Tenn. Comp. R. & Regs. 0400-45-01-.33
Original rule filed August 1, 2012; effective October 30, 2012. Rule was previously numbered 1200-05-01. Amendments and new rules filed November 24, 2015; effective February 22, 2016. Amendments filed November 19, 2018; effective 2/17/2019.

Authority: T.C.A. §§ 4-5-201, et seq. and 68-221-701, et seq.

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